Source: US House to vote on bill allowing 9/11 victims to sue Saudis

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WASHINGTON, Sept 7 (Reuters) - The U.S. House of Representatives will vote this week on legislation that would allow the families of Sept. 11 attack victims to sue Saudi Arabia's government for damages, a House leadership source said on Wednesday.

Since the U.S. Senate passed the "Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act," or JASTA, unanimously in May, House passage would set up a potential showdown with the White House, which has threatened a veto.

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The Saudis, who deny responsibility for the 2001 attacks on the United States, also object strongly to the bill.

The timing of the House vote was first reported by Politico.

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9/11 memorials at the Pentagon, in Shanksville, Penn., and elsewhere
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9/11 memorials at the Pentagon, in Shanksville, Penn., and elsewhere
A woman sits amongst U.S. Army honor guard members at the Pentagon 9/11 Memorial in Washington September 11, 2015. An overcast Friday greeted relatives who gathered to commemorate nearly 3,000 people killed in the September 11 attacks in New York, Pennsylvania and outside Washington 14 years ago, when airliners hijacked by al Qaeda militants brought death, mayhem and destruction. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
A United States flag is unfurled at sunrise at the Pentagon on the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, in Washington September 11, 2015. Relatives of the nearly 3,000 people killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks are due to gather in New York, Pennsylvania and outside Washington on Friday to mark the 14th anniversary of the hijacked airliner strikes carried out by al Qaeda militants. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
A man walks through the 9/11 Empty Sky memorial at sunrise across from New York's Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey, September 11, 2013. Americans will commemorate the 12th anniversary of the September 11 attacks with solemn ceremonies and pledges to not forget the nearly 3,000 killed when hijacked jetliners crashed into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and a Pennsylvania field. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn (UNITED STATES - Tags: CITYSCAPE DISASTER ANNIVERSARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
An unidentified couple sit on a bench during a memorial service on the 11th anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001 to honor the 184 people who lost their lives when American Airlines flt. 77 crashed into the Pentagon, outside Washington, September 11, 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ANNIVERSARY POLITICS)
A sign shows the date of the September 11, 2001 attacks, at the Pentagon Memorial near Washington June 28, 2011. The tenth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks will be commemorated this year.REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ANNIVERSARY)
SHANKSVILLE, PA - AUGUST 19: Trees planted throughout the grounds the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania on August 19, 2016. American Airlines Flight 93 crashed into a field outside Shanksville, PA with 33 passengers, seven crew members, and four hijackers aboard on September 11, 2001. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
SHANKSVILLE, PA- SEPTEMBER 11:Guests visit the Flight 93 National Memorial during the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attack in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson and other dignitaries spoke at the occasion and layed a wreath at the memorial. Today marks the 14th anniversary of the attacks where nearly 3,000 people were killed in New York, Washington D.C. and Pennsylvania. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
SHANKSVILLE, PA- SEPT 09: The new visitor center features dramatic concrete walls that follow the path of the doomed Flight 93. Over the edge (past where the people can be seen in the photo) is the wall of names area and the crash impact site. Thursday September 10, 2015 is the official opening for the new Visitor Center at the Flight 93 National Memorial. These photos were taken during a preview on September 9, 2015. The new visitor center has extensive displays that walks attendees through the events that occurred in Shanksville, Pa. on 9/11. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
SHANKSVILLE, PA- SEPT 09: When one tours the new visitor center there is a timeline of the terrible events of the day etched in the walkway leading to a view of the Flight 93 impact site. Thursday September 10, 2015 is the official opening for the new Visitor Center at the Flight 93 National Memorial. These photos were taken during a preview on September 9, 2015. The new visitor center has extensive displays that walks attendees through the events that occurred in Shanksville, Pa. on 9/11. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
JERSEY CITY, NJ - SEPTEMBER 10: A color guard stands inside the Empty Sky Memorial structure during the structure's dedication at Liberty State Park on September 10, 2011 in Jersey City, New Jersey. Empty Sky Memorial consists of two 30 foot tall concrete and steel structures, inscribed with the 746 names of victims who lived in New Jersey and were killed during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
BAYONNE, NJ - SEPTEMBER 11: Catholic War Veterans of Bayonne Sam Capodice (L-R) Robert Bell, and Mike Capodice, check out the monument To The Struggle Against World Terrorism on the fifth anniversary of 9/11 terrorist attacks after dedication ceremony September 11, 2006 in Bayonne, New Jersey. To The Struggle Against World Terrorism memorial is a gift from Russian President Vladimir Putin, the People of Russia and sculptur Zurab Tsereteli to the people of the United States. (Photo by Sylwia Kapuscinski/Getty Images)
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If it became law, JASTA would remove sovereign immunity, which prevents lawsuits against governments, for countries found to be involved in terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. It would allow survivors of the attacks, and relatives of those killed in the attacks, to seek damages from other countries.

In this case, it would allow lawsuits to proceed in federal court in New York as lawyers try to prove that the Saudis were involved in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon in Washington.

Fifteen of the 19 Sept. 11 hijackers were Saudi citizens.

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The remaining tower of New York's World Trade Center, Tower 2, dissolves in a cloud of dust and debris about a half hour after the first twin tower collapsed September 11, 2001. Each of the towers were hit by hijacked airliners in one of numerous acts of terrorism directed at the United States September 11, 2001. The pictures were made from across the Hudson River in Jersey City, New Jersey. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine
394261 78: Civilians take cover as a dust cloud from the collapse of the World Trade Center envelops lower Manhattan, September 11, 2001. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
This file photo dated 11 September 2001 shows Edward Fine covering his mouth as he walks through the debris after the collapse of one of the World Trade Center Towers in New York. Fine was on the 78th floor of 1 World Trade Center when it was hit by a hijacked plane 11 September. Americans mark the fourth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks Sunday nagged by new burning questions about their readiness to confront a major disaster after the debacle of Hurricane Katrina. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
394261 63: Dust swirls around south Manhattan moments after a tower of the World Trade Center collapsed September 11, 2001 in New York City after two airplanes slammed into the twin towers in an alleged terrorist attack. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Office towers of Lower Manhattan in New York's financial district engulfed in smoke and dust from the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings. (Photo by James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images)
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A group of firefighters walk near the remains of the destroyed World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001. Two hijacked U.S. commercial planes slammed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center early on Tuesday, causing both 110-story landmarks to collapse in thunderous clouds of fire and smoke. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton JC/SV
A group of firefighters stand in the street near the destroyed World Trade Center in New York on September 11, 2001. Two hijacked U.S. commercial planes slammed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, causing both 110-story landmarks to collapse in thunderous clouds of fire and smoke. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton JC/SV
An office filled with dust and damage has a view of the wreckage of the World Trade Center 25 September, 2001 in New York. Search and rescue efforts continue in the aftermath of the 11 September terrorist attack. AFP PHOTO/Eric FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Graffiti for victims of the World Trade Center are written on windows covered in dust from the collapse 22 September 2001 New York. War appeared imminent as the United States stepped up the deployment of military forces south and west of Afghanistan, the base of Saudi-born Osama bin Laden, who is pinpointed as the chief suspect in the deadly September 11 terrorist onslaught on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. AFP PHOTO Eric FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
398760 04: This image captured by a satellite on September 12, 2001 shows an area of white dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood in New York City. Terrorists slammed two hijacked airliners into the twin towers on September 11, killing some 3,000 people. (Photo by Spaceimaging.com/Getty Images)
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