Rachel Dolezal has been invited to an event about black hair

Rachel Dolezal Writing A Book About Race


Rachel Dolezal was publicly disgraced for claiming that she identified as black amid accusations she had long tried to pass herself off as African-American. Now, she is actively being asked to represent black culture.

Dolezal was invited to attend the Braid On Economic Liberty March & Rally in Dallas led by natural hair stylist and activist Isis Brantley. The rally is branded as an event to encourage black women's hair care and empowerment.

In 2015, Dolezal resigned as president of the Spokane, Washington, chapter of the NAACP after her parents informed local NBC affiliate KHQ-TV in Spokane that Dolezal is white, and not of African-American descent.

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NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal
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NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal
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Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal is seen in the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (R) hugs family member Izaiah Dolezal after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (C) smiles toward family member Izaiah Dolezal (L) while her son Franklin (R) stands nearby after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People cheer during a protest in front of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) headquarters in Spokane, Washington June 15, 2015. Rachel Dolezal, a civil rights advocate who has been accused of falsely claiming she is black, announced her resignation on Monday as leader of a local branch of the NAACP in Washington state. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Brantley told the New York Times that she had no idea about Dolezal's reputation and had invited her after seeing her braiding on TV.

"People threatened to boycott me [after the announcement]," she told the New York Times. "They are calling me a sellout. ... I just stopped looking [at the backlash on social media] and blocked everybody."

Brantley also stressed that Dolezal would only be "meeting and greeting" other attendees and would not have a headlining role.

However, the Daily Beast points out that Brantley sent a message on Facebook months ago asking if Dolezal should be allowed on a team of organizers for another march and natural hair event in Washington, D.C., causing some to cast doubt on Brantley's claim that she knew nothing of Dolezal's reputation.

"Isis knows exactly what she's doing and why she's doing it," argued Kerin Rodriguez, who has attended other events of Brantley's. "[She wants] to get people to go to her event."

"I'm not coming [to the rally] as a curiosity or for anycontroversy," Dolezal told the Daily Beast. "My intention is to support Isis and the braid freedom movement in whatever way it will be most helpful. I don't want to be a liability for anyone. It's a justice issue and I've been a social justice activist for years. It's really that simple."


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