CDC almost out of Zika money, director says

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is almost out of money to fight the Zika virus, the agency's director said Tuesday — just hours before Florida announced three fresh homegrown cases of the infection.

Zika has now infected 46 people locally in Florida, presumably spread by mosquitoes. One case is part of an outbreak in Miami Beach and health officials say they're trying to trace the origins of two others.

And the CDC, which has been helping Florida track cases and fight mosquitoes, is almost broke.

"Basically, we are out of money and we need Congress to act," Frieden told reporters.

"The cupboard is bare."

Last February, President Barack Obama asked Congress for $1.9 billion in emergency funds to fight Zika. Congress has resisted, with controlling Republicans saying they want more accountability for the money and saying health agencies like the CDC and National Institutes of Health need to find money left over from fighting Ebola and other projects.

Brazil reporting more microcephaly cases, defect cause by Zika:

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Brazil reporting more microcephaly cases, defect cause by Zika
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Democrats turned down a Republican plan that would give the CDC and NIH some money but would take money away from Planned Parenthood.

Congress comes back from a seven-week summer break next Tuesday and agencies are lined up to demand quick action.

Related: Zika Damages Babies' Hearing

"What will happen at the end of September is the fiscal year ends," Frieden said. There are no hints from the Republican-controlled House on how the federal budget will be renewed.

Frieden said the CDC did repurpose tens of millions of dollars. Of the $222 million allocated for Zika, $200 million is "already out the door," Frieden said. "That money is already spoken for." He said $197.3 million had actually been spent.

The CDC has spent a lot in Puerto Rico, where Zika has caused a full-blown epidemic.

Travelers have brought the virus to nearly all the U.S. states, and those where Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are common — 26 in all — risk outbreaks if any infected travelers get bitten.

Florida has had two outbreaks and two dozen other single cases. Texas and other Gulf states are highly vulnerable, as well. "It's still the peak of mosquito season. It usually doesn't end until the end of October," Frieden said. "Unfortunately, we will see large numbers of infected infants in the coming weeks and months."

Brazilian twins born, one with microcephaly and one without:

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Brazilian twins, one with Zika microcephaly and one without
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Brazilian twins, one with Zika microcephaly and one without
Five-month-old twins Laura (R) and Lucas lie on a bed at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (R), 25, stands next to her mother Manyara (C), 46, who holds her five-month-old granddaughter Laura, as Paulo (L), 8, holds his five-month-old brother Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (L), 25, holds her five-month-old twins, Laura (R) and Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Five-month-old twins, Laura (L) and Lucas lie in a buggy at an entrance of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as her twin brother Lucas (R), lies in a buggy at an entrance of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as she uses her mobile phone at the end of an evaluation session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A physiotherapist gestures as Jaqueline (R), 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura during an evaluation session at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (R), 25, holds her five-month-old son Lucas while her mother Manyara (L), 46, holds her five-month-old granddaughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (L), 25, and her five-month-old daughter Laura (C) are seen during a session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old son Lucas as she gives a pacifier to her five-month-old daughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (C), 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura, as she takes a selfie with her children Gabrielle (2nd L), 4, and Paulo (R), 8, and her mother Manyara (L), 46, who holds five-month-old Lucas in front of their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old Laura undergoes a medical test at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 28, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A physiotherapist exercises five-month-old Laura during an evaluation session at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, holds her five-month-old daughter Laura as they wait for a session with a physiotherapist at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old Laura gets her head measured by the neurologist, Maria Leal Santos, at the Casa da Esperanca Hospital (Hope House Hospital) in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline, 25, bathes her five-month-old daughter Laura at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition.. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Five-month-old twins, Laura (L) and Lucas lie in their bed at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Jaqueline (C), 25, breastfeeds her five-month-old daughter Laura as a doctor (back) holds five-month-old Lucas during a medical test at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 28, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Paulo (C), 8, holds his five-month-old sister Laura as his grandmother Manyara (back), 46, holds her five-month-old grandson Lucas at their house in Santos, Sao Paulo state, Brazil April 20, 2016. Among the mysteries facing doctors in Brazil battling an epidemic of the little-known Zika virus are cases of women giving birth to twins with only one suffering from microcephaly, a birth defect associated with the disease. Jaqueline Jessica Silva de Oliveira hoped doctors were wrong when a routine ultrasound showed that one of her unborn twins would be born with the condition, marked by stunted head size and developmental issues. "When I found out one of them had microcephaly the ground fell out from beneath me," she said. Laura was born with the microcephaly while her twin brother Lucas does not suffer from the condition. REUTERS/Nacho Doce SEARCH "NACHO TWINS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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The CDC's trying to track every single pregnant woman with Zika. So far, it's watching 584 in the U.S. states and another 812 in the territories, mostly Puerto Rico.

"Already, there have been 16 infants born in the continental U.S. with Zika. That number will increase," Frieden said. "The numbers in Puerto Rico will likely be substantial."

Related: Expect More Zika Cases, Experts Say

Most people don't get seriously ill from Zika but there is no doubt it causes severe birth defects — not just microcephaly, marked by a small and misshapen head, but major brain damage and effects on hearing, vision and limb development. It causes miscarriages and there's no way to fix the brain damage once it has happened.

The virus can be spread sexually, adding another layer of complications, and the mosquito that spreads it is extremely hard to eradicate.

Add to this a population uneasy about the use of insecticides, mosquito repellent and high-tech modified mosquitoes to fight the biting bugs, and you have a very complex battle. Frieden said the CDC needs money to develop better tests for the virus, to help the NIH work on a vaccine, to study babies born to women infected and to defend as much as possible against more importations of the virus.

"We are at the point where actions that are taken in the current time will have implications for decades to come," Frieden said.

"There are a lot of things that we cannot do for lack of resources."

He said CDC is already borrowing from other vital programs.

"We have had to take money from areas including emergency preparedness in the United States, Ebola...immunization programs, HIV, monitoring disease," he said. The CDC took $38 million from Ebola funding and $44 million from emergency response funding.

Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county:

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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel peers into a drain in Miami's Wynwood district to detect any mosquito presence on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel stops to write in her log on Northwest 28th Street in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. On foot and in her truck, Nagel covered a swath of the district to combat any mosquito presence. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Diana Ozuna, with her 20-month-old daughter Lianah, lives in Miami's Wynwood district -- an area in which the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes. On Saturday, July 30, 2016, Ozuna talks about the threat of the virus. She says she takes the threat seriously and applies protective spray on her and her daughter. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel drops a chemical tablet into a drain that shows signs of mosquitos in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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"We have sent well over $100 million to states, territories and tribal health departments," Frieden added.

Frieden said the CDC has giving Florida everything they asked for and needed. "But at this point, we don't have any more resources to provide them," he said.

"We've spent money of mosquito control, both in Puerto Rico and elsewhere."

If Zika breaks out in Texas, say in October, the CDC may not be able to send in response teams or supplies, Frieden said. "We might not have the resources to do that."

"The speed of the clock ticking in Congress is not the same speed as a clock ticking with an epidemic."

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