Rescued pets from the Louisiana floods have nowhere to go

Rescued Pets From the Louisiana Floods Have Nowhere to Go

An animal rescue non-profit is stepping in to help pets who have been misplaced by the devastating floods in Louisiana.

Aside from the thousands of homeowners who have been left with nowhere to go, pets have been displaced.

RELATED: Devastating scenes from Louisiana of flooding

12 PHOTOS
Devastating scenes from Louisiana of flooding
See Gallery
Devastating scenes from Louisiana of flooding
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans rescues three people from a rooftop due to flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S., A in this still image from video taken on August 13, 2016. Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans rescues three people from a rooftop due to flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S., in this still image from video taken on August 13, 2016. Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A truck drives through a flooded street in Greenwell Springs, Louisiana, U.S., August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jeffrey Dubinsky
Residents survey flooding on Lee Street after heavy rains in Sorrento, Louisiana, U.S. August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Edmund D. Fountain
A flooded house is seen in Prairieville, Louisiana, U.S., August 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A casket is seen in front of a partially submerged church in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A submerged vehicle is seen in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A submerged house is seen in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Richard Rossi and his 4 year old great grandson Justice wade through water in search of higher ground after their home took in water in St. Amant, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Residents are rescued in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Brittany Addox carries her dog, Maggie, after being rescued in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

And, sadly, the state is running out of places for rescued animals to go.

But it didn't take long for members of non-profit animal saving group Guardians of Rescue to realize shelters were crammed beyond capacity or had simply been destroyed by the floods.

Despite rescuing countless animals, they were told there wasn't any more room in the shelters that withstood the damage.

On top of that, the group's founder, Robert Misseri, says the overall rescue effort has receded, along with the once-high waters.

Misseri says scenes like this are rare, where pet owners are reunited with their animals.

So while hard-hit spots like the Denham Springs Animal Shelter pick up the pieces so they can house displaced animals, the call was answered from other shelters across the country.

The team from PAWS Chicago, the largest no-kill shelter in the Midwest, arrived to transport a number of the dogsrescued from the floods to their facility.

Hopefully, now that they're safe and sound, they'll be able to start over too.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.