Scientists say woolly mammoth will return

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Scientists Say Woolly Mammoth Will Return

By: Josh King

Woolly mammoths are coming back and we don't mean another "Ice Age" movie sequel.

Scientists are suggesting that bringing the woolly mammoth back from the dead, as well as other extinct species, is only a matter of time.

SEE ALSO: Researchers say the last woolly mammoths died out due to thirst

The concept of animal de-extinction has long been in the works and the Union for Conservation of Nature has even issued its first guidelines in extinct species resurrection.

The important issue facing scientists is how to return these extinct species to their natural habitat.

The grassland ecosystem that the mammoth once thrived in is very different in today's times. However, scientists believe the habitat can be recreated.

Scientists have proposed only resurrecting species that have recently gone extinct and would therefore be able to more seamlessly fit back into the ecosystem.

As the conversation carries on, scientists believe that de-extinction of certain animals could greatly benefit ecological communities.

Related: Also see these fascinating dinosaurs:

12 PHOTOS
Dinosaur bones and illustrations
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Dinosaur bones and illustrations
Fossil of a short-tailed pterosaur, a flying reptile, Pterodactylus kochi, Upper Jurassic Solnhofen limestone, Eichstaett, Germany, Photographed under controlled conditions (Specimen courtesy of Raimund Albersdoerfer, Germany), (Photo by Wild Horizons/UIG via Getty Images)
Fossil of a short-tailed pterosaur, a flying reptile, Pterodactylus kochi, Upper Jurassic Solnhofen limestone, Solnhofen, Bavaria, Germany, Photographed under controlled conditions (Specimen courtesy of Raimund Albersdoerfer, Germany), (Photo by Wild Horizons/UIG via Getty Images)
CANADA - OCTOBER 30: The spiked skull of a Styracosaurus, Toronto, Canada (Photo by Ira Block/National Geographic/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 09: A Hyolith from the Cambrian has an armored shell body, Museum of Natural History, Washington, District of Columbia (Photo by O. Louis Mazzatenta/National Geographic/Getty Images)
CANADA - MAY 30: The skull and crest of a Parasaurolophus, Toronto, Canada (Photo by Ira Block/National Geographic/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 23: Struthiomimus dinosaur hunting a dragonfly (Struthiomimus altus) (Photo by De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 23: Side profile of an aellosaurus walking (Photo by De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images)
06/09/98 - Location- Smithsonian Natural History Museum caption- Nathan Myhrvold has some interesting theories on the evolution, disappearance of dinosaurs. His models have been created on computer. His day job is Chief Technical Officer of Microsoft. Rear is the Diplodocus that has the long tail with the fused sections in all the tails, leading Myhrvold to the belief that the dinosaur cracked its tail like a whip, the end section moving near the speed of sound. - Photo By Craig Herndon TWP (Photo by Craig Herndon/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
Dr Adam Yates, from the Bernard Price Institute for Paleontological Research, looks at the 'Aardonyx Celestae', a newly discovered fossil skeleton in Johannesburg on November 11, 2009. South African palaeontologists announced the discovery of a new species of 'transition' dinosaur that straddles the divide between the four-legged giant plant-eating sauropods and their bipedal carnivorous predecessors. The dinosaur roamed the area between 183 million and 200 million years ago, measured between 7 and 9 metres long. The specimen was a juvenile, which was aged between 7 and 10 years. The Aardonyx Celestae, as the new dinosaur has been named, was discovered on a farm in central Free State province in the Karoo Basin, an area rich in fossils. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)
UNDATED - In this handout provided by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, an artist's redering depicts a previously unknown bird-like dinosaur that was formally introduced to the scientific community by scientists with the Smithsonians National Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the University of Utah March 19, 2014. Dubbed Anzu wyliei, referring both to a mythological feathered demon and the name of a Carnegie museum trustee's grandson, the seven-foot-tall creature weighed about 500 pounds when it roamed western North America 66 to 68 million years ago. (Illustration by Mark Klingler/Carnegie Museum of Natural History via Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 2003: Reconstruction of the flora and fauna of a marshy environment from the Jurassic Period, drawing. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
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