Assange: WikiLeaks will reveal 'thousands' more Clinton documents before the election

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WikiLeaks Founder Says Big Leak on Hillary Clinton Could Lead to Indictment

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange promised he's not done leaking information that could be damaging to Hillary Clinton. During an interview this week with Fox's Megyn Kelly he said the documents would be "significant" in perhaps turning the tide of the 2016 election by giving voters a better understanding who they're electing.

According to Assange:

We have a lot of pages of material, thousands of pages of material.

I don't want to give the game away, but it's a variety of different types of documents from different institutions that are associated with the election campaign. There are some unexpected angles that are quite interesting, and some that are even entertaining.

Assange wasn't asked about WikiLeaks' departure from standards it once held itself to. In the previous three data leaks, the organization published dozens of credit card and social security numbers for people that weren't implicated in the leak itself.

It's also faced criticism recently for putting women in danger after leaking the Erdogan emails from the Turkish government earlier this year.

RELATED: See photos of Assange

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A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds a banner outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds banners outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange makes a speech from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy, in central London, Britain February 5, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/Files
Julian Assange, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of WikiLeaks speaks via video link during a press conference on the occasion of the ten year anniversary celebration of WikiLeaks in Berlin, Germany, October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Axel Schmidt TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears on screen via video link during his participation as a guest panelist in an International Seminar on the 60th anniversary of the college of Journalists of Chile in Santiago, Chile, July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido
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Assange disagrees with the criticism.

He told CNN's Jake Tapper:

We have a 10 year history of publishing pristine archives under the rubric of 'scientific journalism'—which we invented. The readers can check the accuracy of any story, and that material can go on to be used in litigations and prosecutions.

He's not wrong. WikiLeaks has had a stellar reputation thus far when it comes to truth. Lately though, the organization seems to have taken liberties with some of its previous ethical standards in favor of creating a more compelling story. The information is still accurate, but as evidenced in this tweet — it's bordering on sensationalist and perhaps even intentionally misleading.

For now though, the world lies in wait to see what Assange offers next.

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