ISIS tells future terrorists to use common items as weapons

New ISIS Video Tells Terrorists To Use Everyday Items

ISIS has a new strategy for terror attacks.

In a newly released video, ISIS suggests terrorists use everyday items as weapons — things like baseball bats or power screwdrivers. This idea builds on what happened in Nice, France.

SEE MORE: How Many ISIS Fighters Are There? It's Hard To Tell

In July, a 31-year-old man drove a 20-ton truck into crowds of people along Nice's Promenade des Anglais. At least 86 people died from the attack, and more than 200 were injured.

The rise in attacks on soft targets, which are unprotected public places, goes hand in hand with the call to use non-traditional weapons — both help attackers avoid calling attention to themselves.

RELATED: See the inspiring moment when a woman breaks free of ISIS control and removes her niqab for the first time

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Woman freed from ISIS, removes niqab for first time
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Woman freed from ISIS, removes niqab for first time
Souad Hamidi, 19, removes the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S.-backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi, 19, removes the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S.-backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi, 19, removes the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S.-backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi, 19, stands near the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S.-backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi (C), 19, stands near the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S. backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
A combination picture shows Souad Hamidi, 19, removing the niqab she said she had been forced to wear since 2014, after U.S.-backed Syria Democratic Forces took control of her village Am Adasa in northern Syria from Islamic State fighters, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 9, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi (2nd L), 19, poses for a photograph inside her family home, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 11, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi (2nd L), 19, sits with other members of her family inside their home, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 11, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
Souad Hamidi (3rd L), 19, poses for a photograph with other members of her family inside their home, in the outskirts of Manbij, Aleppo province, Syria June 11, 2016. REUTERS/Rodi Said
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And terrorists who act alone are harder to anticipate since there's little to no command structure or communication system. They also allow ISIS to claim responsibility after the fact.

SEE MORE: Here's Why Lone Wolf Terrorism Is On The Rise

That seems to be the case with Nice. Prosecutors say the driver, who was killed on the scene, had accomplices who helped him plot the attack, but they mostly seemed to fly under the radar.

Last month, two men were arrested in connection with that attack.

The new ISIS video seems to suggest attacking the United States and France. It includes footage of American polling places, though not of the presidential candidates, along with France's Eiffel Tower and the French flag.

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