Satellite captures 'ghostly' images of Northern Lights

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Satellite Spots 'Ghostly' Northern Lights over Parts Of U.S.

The Northern Lights, also called "Aurora borealis," are a beautiful natural phenomenon that we're either lucky enough to see in person, or have to enjoy through photos. The Northern Lights Centre in Canada explains that the phenomenon are actually caused by collisions of magnetic particles, and can be seen above magnetic poles in either hemisphere.

A solar storm caused an aurora to occur Tuesday, August 2 -- and the results were stunning. Observers in Canada and the Northern United States were treated to the spectacular sight. Some took to sharing on social media to share their incredible photos:

See more of the stunning Northern Lights:

13 PHOTOS
General aurora borealis, auroras, Northern Lights
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General aurora borealis, auroras, Northern Lights
Photo workshop, learning how to photograph the Northern Lights in the arctic winter. Geothermal Hot spring area, Hverarond, Iceland
Person enjoying the Northern lights over geothermal hot spring area, Hverarond, Iceland
Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis, shining bright in the arctic winter, Iceland.
Canada, Nunavut, Territory, Aurora borealis glows in night sky above C-Dory expedition boat in Roes Welcome Sound in northern Hudson Bay
Person viewing the Northern lights over the lava landscape, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland
Colorful Auroras and Stars by the Fljotsdalur valley, Iceland
The Aurora Borealis bright up the sky at twilight on March 17, 2013 between the towns of Are and Ostersund, Sweden. AFP PHOTO/JONATHAN NACKSTRAND (Photo credit should read JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images)
An Aurora borealis is pictured near the city of Tromsoe, northern Norway, late on January 24, 2012. AFP PHOTO / Scanpix / Rune Stoltz Bertinussen NORWAY OUT (Photo credit should read Rune Stoltz Bertinussen/AFP/Getty Images)
OSTBY, SWEDEN: A display of Aurora Borealis, northern lights, in Ostby, 19 August 2006. The northern lights occur in a circular band around the geomagnetic north pole, otherwise known as the northern lights oval. It is a result of the atmosphere shielding the earth against solar particles which would otherwise make the planet uninhabitable. On their way down towards the geomagnetic poles, the solar particles are stopped by Earth's atmosphere, which acts as an effective shield against these deadly particles. When the solar particles are stopped by the atmosphere, they collide with the atmospheric gases present, and the collision energy between the solar particle and the gas molecule is emitted as a photon - a light particle. And when you have many such collisions, you have an aurora - lights that may seem to move across the sky. AFP PHOTO / SVEN NACKSTRAND (Photo credit should read SVEN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images)
KANGERLUSSUAQ, GREENLAND - SEPTEMBER 02: (ISRAEL OUT) The Aurora Borealis glows over a lake September 02, 2007, near the Greenland town of Kangerlussuaq. The Northern Lights most often occurs from September to October and from March to April and are a popular tourist attraction. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)
The magnetic solar storm arranged a colourful show of aurora borealis in the night skies of Hyvinka in Southern Finland early morning, 31 October 2003. AFP PHOTO/LEHTIKUVA /PEKKA SAKKI / *** FINLAND OUT *** (Photo credit should read PEKKA SAKKI/AFP/Getty Images)
387304 01: UNDATED FILE PHOTO: Aurora Australis, the Southern Lights as seen from South Australia as with Aurora Borealis, are displayed during strong geomagnetic events. According to NASA March 29, 2001 the sun recently sent a powerful energy burst in the direction of Earth triggering dazzling aurora displays over nighttime skies on Friday and Saturday, NASA astronomers said. Directed toward Earth, such blasts can distort Earth's magnetic field, producing in extreme latitudes, colorful nocturnal sky displays known as auroras, or the Northern and Southern Lights. (Photo courtesy of NOAA/Newsmakers)
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Other photos, however, showed a more ghostly sight of the Northern Lights than we are used to seeing:

These photos, taken by the SuomiNPP satellite, show the Northern Lights "floating" above North America. While these images show a different -- and slightly creepier -- perspective of the lights, they still prove to be stunning.

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