Plea to rescue baby orca seen alone gains momentum

Plea To Rescue Baby Orca Seen Alone Gains Momentum

Since July 14, a baby orca has been swimming alone in New Zealand's Bay of Plenty, reports the New Zealand Herald.

The calf is away from its pod and is likely having a hard time surviving without the support of fellow whales.

New Zealand's Department of Conservation (DOC) issued a statement noting that "...specialists are advising DOC to take a precautionary approach and avoid any actions that will stress the young animal or unintentionally prevent its return to its family pod."

See photos of orcas below:

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An orca swims at the Marineland animal exhibition park in the French Riviera city of Antibes, southeastern France, on December 12, 2013. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
MARCH 20, 2014. SAN DIEGO, CA. During a night time performance at Shamu Stadium, a trained orca killer whale leaps above the pool at Sea World, San Diego, CA on March 20, 2014. In the aftermath of the documentary 'Blackfish', critics are suggesting an end to keeping whales captive for entertainment. (Photo by Don Bartletti/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Orcas perform on August 11, 2013 at the Marineland animal exhibition park in the French Riviera city of Antibes, southeastern France. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Big Orca Sunset Spyhop
An orca swims with its calf at the Marineland animal exhibition park in the French Riviera city of Antibes, southeastern France, on December 12, 2013. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Female orca Wikie swims with her calf born by artificial insemination on April 19, 2011 at Marineland animal exhibition park in the French Riviera city of Antibes, southeastern France. Born on March 16, the two metre long baby weighing 150 kilos hasn't yet been called. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Orca killer whale (Orcinus orca), headshot
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However, according to the Orca Research Trust, intervention is necessary as "the calf appears severely dehydrated."

For how much longer the young whale can sustain itself is unknown.

The trust is asking for the public's assistance in convincing the Department of Conservation to allow the Orca Research Trust to step in.

Those in support of saving the baby orca can assist in a number of ways.

Signatures are being collected on a petition posted to Change.org.

People in the area are asked to call in sightings of groups of orcas near the Bay of Plenty and to refrain from disturbing the calf in any way.

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