North Carolina may change its controversial 'bathroom law' — but critics say it's not enough

North Carolina Bathroom Law Spurs Growing Opposition

North Carolina is considering changes to its controversial "bathroom law" that ignited nationwide outrage — but critics say the changes don't go nearly far enough.

As it stands, the law prevents local governments in North Carolina from passing nondiscrimination ordinances, and bans transgender people from using the bathroom that corresponds with their gender identity.

SEE ALSO: Justice Department files complaint over North Carolina bathroom law

But draft legislation obtained by Charlotte news station WBTV suggests lawmakers may be walking back portions of the bill. The biggest change in the draft would allow transgender people to provide certificates of sex reassignment to prove their new gender.

The draft would also increase penalties for certain felonies committed in public bathrooms and locker rooms, including sexual assault and rape — as well as establishing an "anti-discrimination task force" to review issues with the law.

The potential changes are a result of discussions between state officials and the NBA, according to WBTV.

League commissioner Adam Silver has said that the state must change the law in order for Charlotte to retain hosting privileges for the 2017 NBA All-Star Game, and one source told WBTV the proposed legislation could help the city keep the event.

Still, critics panned the proposed changes, arguing that anything less than a full repeal of the law falls short.

See photos from the protest of the North Carolina 'bathroom law:'

10 PHOTOS
Protests against North Carolina transgender bathroom law
See Gallery
Protests against North Carolina transgender bathroom law
ASHEVILLE, NC - JUNE 21: A display inside Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe in Asheville, North Carolina features books by authors who support the repeal of HB2 on June 21, 2016. Malaprop's has had authors cancel and a decline in sales due to North Carolina's HB2 legislation, commonly known as the bathroom bill, and the resulting boycott of the state by authors, athletes and tourists. (Photo by Jacob Biba for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
ASHEVILLE, NC - JUNE 21: A sign next to the men's bathroom inside Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe in Asheville, North Carolina denounces North Carolina's HB2 legislation on June 21, 2016. Malaprop's has had authors cancel and a decline in sales due to North Carolina's HB2 legislation, commonly known as the bathroom bill, and the resulting boycott of the state by authors, athletes and tourists. (Photo by Jacob Biba for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
ASHEVILLE, NC - JUNE 21: A bulletin board inside Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe in Asheville, North Carolina features upcoming author visits and events scheduled for the bookstore on June 21, 2016. Malaprop's has had authors cancel and a decline in sales due to North Carolina's HB2 legislation, commonly known as the bathroom bill, and the resulting boycott of the state by authors, athletes and tourists. (Photo by Jacob Biba for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 16 - Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 16 - Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)
DURHAM, NC - MAY 10: The 'We Are Not This' slogan is posted at the entrances to Bull McCabes Irish Pub on May 10, 2016 in Durham, North Carolina. Debate over transgender bathroom access spreads nationwide as the U.S. Department of Justice countersues North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory from enforcing the provisions of House Bill 2 (HB2) that dictate what bathrooms transgender individuals can use. (Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)
Elaine Martin, right, listens as Chris Sgro, executive director of Equality NC, speaks during a press conference to announce filing of federal lawsuit challenging North Carolina's HB 2 law at the LGBT Center of Raleigh on Monday, March 28, 2016. Several different advocacy groups and some of the lead plaintiffs spoke at the event. (Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images)
Joaquin Carcano, center, the lead plaintiff in the case, speaks during a press conference to announce filing of federal lawsuit challenging North Carolina's HB 2 law at the LGBT Center of Raleigh on Monday, March 28, 2016. Several different advocacy groups and some of the lead plaintiffs spoke at the event. Joaquin was born a woman and is now a man. Simone Bell with Lambda Law is at left; Chris Brook with the ACLU is at right. (Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images)
TO GO AFP STORY BY BRIGITTE DUSSEAU - Transgender delegates Jamie Shier (L) and Janice Covington pose for photographs at the Convention Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on September 4, 2012. The Democratic National Convention Committee announced Wednesday that US President Barack Obama would move his acceptance speech from the outdoor Bank of America Stadium to the indoor Time Warner Cable Arena due to predictions of thunderstorms. AFP PHOTO / Mladen ANTONOV (Photo credit should read BRIGITTE DUSSEAU/AFP/GettyImages)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"It is the legislative equivalent of throwing a glass of water on a burning building," Cathryn Oakley, senior legislative counsel to the Washington-based Human Rights Campaign, told The Charlotte Observer.

pat mccrory north carolinaReuters

Last month, the US Justice Department and North Carolina filed dueling lawsuits against each other over the law. The Justice Department argued that it violated the Civil Rights Act, putting the state at risk of losing more than $1 billion in federal funding.

Since its signing by Governor Pat McCrory in March, the law has triggered fierce opposition from businesses around the country. PayPal and Deutsche Bank froze major expansions in the state in April, costing North Carolina 650 jobs. A number of entertainer have canceled shows in the state, including Bruce Springsteen, Ringo Starr and Maroon 5.

There is no firm plan to vote on the draft before the General Assembly's session ends on Saturday, according to Raleigh's WRAL

NOW WATCH: The number of times Obama has had to respond to mass shootings during his presidency is staggering

RELATED: President Obama criticizes North Carolina 'bathroom law:'

President Obama Criticizes North Carolina 'Bathroom Bill'

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.