Spectacular images show glowing Jupiter

Spectacular Images Show Glowing Jupiter Just Days Prior to Juno's Arrival

NASA's Juno spacecraft is expected to reach Jupiter soon, on July 4, after nearly 5 years in transit, reports The Independent.

In advance of its arrival, researchers at the University of Leicester in the U.K. have captured high-resolution infrared images of the planet.

According to a press release by the European Southern Observatory, or ESO, one of the images shows Jupiter's "turbulent atmosphere, rippling with cooler gas clouds."

Such views are typically difficult to achieve because both Earth and Jupiter have fluctuating atmospheres, but the team was able to attain them with the ESO's Very Large Telescope through a series of "very short exposures."

Once Juno reaches Jupiter, it will spend about 1.5 years collecting data related to its terrain, atmospheric water content, and gravitational and magnetic fields.

RELATED: Jupiter's red spot:

7 PHOTOS
Jupiter Red Spot
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Jupiter Red Spot
This dramatic view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Jupiter's trademark Great Red Spot — a swirling storm feature larger than Earth — is shrinking. This downsizing, which is changing the shape of the spot from an oval into a circle, has been known about since the 1930s, but now these striking new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images capture the spot at a smaller size than ever before.
This dramatic view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 13: This photograph taken by Voyager 1 shows a close up of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, a storm that has been raging in the gas giant�s atmosphere for at least three hundred years. The white spot shows another cloud system that is believed to have formed around 1940. Jupiter�s atmosphere is made up of 90 % hydrogen and almost 10 % helium, together with traces of other gases, including methane and ammonia. Immensely strong winds occur, and the storm clouds exhibit colours which are thought to be due to chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 to explore the planets in the outer solar system. Voyager 1 flew past Jupiter at a distance of 278,000 kilometres in March 1979 before flying on to Saturn. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Jupiter fr. equator to southern polar latitudes close to Great Red Spot, as depicted by Voyager spacecraft. (Photo by Time Life Pictures/NASA/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)
circa 1973: An artist's impression of a Pioneer probe passing the Great Red Spot on Jupiter during its mission to photograph the planet's surface and send back data. (Photo by NASA/Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
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