CIA weapons for Syrian rebels sold to arms black market -NYT

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June 26 (Reuters) - Weapons shipped into Jordan for Syrian rebels by the Central Intelligence Agency and Saudi Arabia were stolen by Jordanian intelligence operatives and sold to arms merchants on the black market, the New York Times reported, citing American and Jordanian officials.

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Some of the stolen weapons were used in a shooting in November that killed two Americans and three others at a police training facility in Amman, according to a joint investigation by the New York Times and Al Jazeera.

Related: US arms Syrian rebels:

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Chuck Hagel, U.S. secretary of defense, speaks during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The House majority leader said he anticipates bipartisan support for a measure granting President Barack Obama's request to arm and equip Syrian rebels under an approach that lets skeptical lawmakers register their concerns. Under the plan, the Defense Department and State Department would be required to report to Congress 15 days before putting its proposal into effect and demonstrate how it would work. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, right, speaks during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing with Chuck Hagel, U.S. secretary of defense, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The House majority leader said he anticipates bipartisan support for a measure granting President Barack Obama's request to arm and equip Syrian rebels under an approach that lets skeptical lawmakers register their concerns. Under the plan, the Defense Department and State Department would be required to report to Congress 15 days before putting its proposal into effect and demonstrate how it would work. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, right, speaks during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing with Chuck Hagel, U.S. secretary of defense, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The House majority leader said he anticipates bipartisan support for a measure granting President Barack Obama's request to arm and equip Syrian rebels under an approach that lets skeptical lawmakers register their concerns. Under the plan, the Defense Department and State Department would be required to report to Congress 15 days before putting its proposal into effect and demonstrate how it would work. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A demonstrator from the group CodePink disrupts a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing with Chuck Hagel, U.S. secretary of defense, left, and General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The House majority leader said he anticipates bipartisan support for a measure granting President Barack Obama's request to arm and equip Syrian rebels under an approach that lets skeptical lawmakers register their concerns. Under the plan, the Defense Department and State Department would be required to report to Congress 15 days before putting its proposal into effect and demonstrate how it would work. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, center, speaks during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing with Chuck Hagel, U.S. secretary of defense, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The House majority leader said he anticipates bipartisan support for a measure granting President Barack Obama's request to arm and equip Syrian rebels under an approach that lets skeptical lawmakers register their concerns. Under the plan, the Defense Department and State Department would be required to report to Congress 15 days before putting its proposal into effect and demonstrate how it would work. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An amendment, authorizing aid to Syrian rebels to combat the Islamic State terrorist group, to a proposed continuing resolution H. J. Res. 124, is arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The amendment, offered by House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon, would permit the Defense Department, in consultation with the State Department, to provide training, equipment, supplies and sustainment to 'appropriately vetted elements of the Syrian opposition' and other groups and individuals.
An amendment, authorizing aid to Syrian rebels to combat the Islamic State terrorist group, to a proposed continuing resolution H. J. Res. 124, is arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The amendment, offered by House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon, would permit the Defense Department, in consultation with the State Department, to provide training, equipment, supplies and sustainment to 'appropriately vetted elements of the Syrian opposition' and other groups and individuals.
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A Jordanian officer shot dead two U.S. government security contractors, a South African trainer and two Jordanians at a U.S.-funded police training facility near Amman before being killed in a shootout, Jordanian authorities had said in November.

The training facility was set up on the outskirts of the capital, Amman, after the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq to help rebuild the shattered country's postwar security forces and to train Palestinian Authority police officers.

The weapons used in the shooting had originally arrived in Jordan for the Syrian rebel training program, the paper reported, citing American and Jordanian officials.

Theft of the weapons, which ended months ago after complaints by the American and Saudi governments, has led to a flood of new weapons available on the arms black market, the New York Times said.

Jordanian officers who were part of the plan "reaped a windfall" from sale of weapons, using the money to buy iPhones, SUVs and other luxury items, according to the paper, which cited Jordanian officials.

The CIA could not be immediately reached for comment. (Reporting by Abinaya Vijayaraghavan in Bengaluru; Editing by Chris Reese)

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