Lone hacker 'Guccifer 2.0' claims responsibility for DNC breach

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Lone Hacker 'Guccifer 2.0' Claims Responsibility for DNC Breach

You've probably heard by now that the Democratic National Committee was hacked. But there still seems to be some uncertainty over the true identity of the hacker or hackers.

The DNC enlisted CrowdStrike, a cybersecurity firm, to look into its systems breach. That company determined two well-known Russian hacking groups were responsible.

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But then a "lone hacker" who goes by Guccifer 2.0 posted some documents from the "many thousands" he or she claims to have extracted from DNC servers..

Among those documents is reportedly more than 260 internal files largely focused on Hillary Clinton. The documents outline criticism of the presumptive nominee and possible defenses on a number of issues, including the 2012 attack in Benghazi and her email controversy.

CrowdStrike stands by its initial findings. It says that Guccifer 2.0's claims don't necessarily lessen the firm's analysis, at least not as far as a connection to the Russian government is concerned.

Outside parties, like Ars Technica, looked into the documents posted online. One of the documents had metadata that led the publication to believe the hacker going by Guccifer 2.0 may still be tied to the Russian government. And at the very least, the hacker is likely a "Russian-speaking [male] with a nostalgia for the country's lost Soviet era."

The name Guccifer is a reference to the hacker who claimed responsibility for hacking Clinton's private email server.

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LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 19: A detail of the Ashley Madison website on August 19, 2015 in London, England. Hackers who stole customer information from the cheating site AshleyMadison.com dumped 9.7 gigabytes of data to the dark web on Tuesday fulfilling a threat to release sensitive information including account details, log-ins and credit card details, if Avid Life Media, the owner of the website didn't take Ashley Madison.com offline permanently. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
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