How to help people affected by Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas

Hurricane Dorian wreaked havoc on parts of the Bahamas over the weekend, killing at least five people and leaving a humanitarian crisis in its wake.

The hurricane reached Category 5 at one point, with peak winds of 185 mph, making it the most powerful storm on record to hit the islands. Thousands of homes and businesses have been destroyed, hospitals sustained damage and swaths of Grand Bahama Island were left largely impassable due to high water and wreckage.

“It’s total devastation. It’s decimated. Apocalyptic. It looks like a bomb went off,” Lia Head-Rigby, who helps run a local hurricane relief organization, told The Associated Press. “It’s not rebuilding something that was there; we have to start again.”

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Hurricane Dorian
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Hurricane Dorian
This Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019 image provided by NASA shows a view of Hurricane Dorian from the International Space Station as it churned over the Atlantic Ocean north of Puerto Rico. Leaving mercifully little damage in its wake in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, Hurricane Dorian swirled toward the U.S., with forecasters warning it will draw energy from the warm, open waters as it closes in. (NASA via AP)
Store shelves are empty of bottled water as residents buy supplies in preparation for Hurricane Dorian, in Doral, Fla., Thursday, July 29, 2019. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Dorian could hit the Florida coast over the weekend as a major hurricane. (AP Photo/Marcus Lim)
Shoppers prepare ahead of Hurricane Dorian at The Home Depot on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, in Pembroke Pines, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Empty shelves are seen with a sign at Costco stating that the retailer is currently sold out of water ahead of Hurricane Dorian on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, in Davie, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham, left, looks on as Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks about Tropical Storm Dorian outside of the the National Hurricane Center, Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, in Miami. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
This GOES-16 satellite image taken Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, at 14:20 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian, right, moving over open waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Dorian was expected to grow into a potentially devastating Category 3 hurricane before hitting the U.S. mainland late Sunday or early Monday somewhere between the Florida Keys and southern Georgia. (NOAA via AP)
Shoppers wait in long lines at Costco, Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, in Davie, Fla., as they stock up on supplies ahead of Hurricane Dorian. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - AUGUST 30: People walk to their boat through a flooded parking lot at the Haulover Marine Center before the arrival of Hurricane Dorian on August 30, 2019 in Miami Beach, Florida. The high water was due to King tide which may cause additional problems as Hurricane Dorian arrives in the area as a possible Category 4 storm along the Florida coast. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA - AUGUST 30: Weston Rice drives through a flooded parking lot as he prepares to drop his jet ski into the water at the Haulover Marine Center before the arrival of Hurricane Dorian on August 30, 2019 in Miami Beach, Florida. The high water was due to King tide which may cause additional problems as Hurricane Dorian arrives in the area as a possible Category 4 storm along the Florida coast. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A man stands on a store's roof as he works to prepare it for the arrival of Hurricane Dorian in Freeport on Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019. Hurricane Dorian intensified yet again Sunday as it closed in on the northern Bahamas, threatening to batter islands with Category 5-strength winds, pounding waves and torrential rain. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
This GOES-16 satellite image taken Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at 17:00 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian, right, churning over the Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane Dorian struck the northern Bahamas on Sunday as a catastrophic Category 5 storm, its 185 mph winds ripping off roofs and tearing down power lines as hundreds hunkered in schools, churches and other shelters. (NOAA via AP)
President Donald Trump, left, listens as Kenneth Graham, director of NOAA's National Hurricane Center, on screen, gives an update during a briefing about Hurricane Dorian at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Washington, at right of Trump is Acting Administrator Pete Gaynor, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler, and Neil Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing about Hurricane Dorian at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Washington, as Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan, left, looks on. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
People walk on a largely deserted beach of the Atlantic Ocean on the barrier island in Vero Beach, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019. The barrier island is under a voluntary evacuation today and a mandatory evacuation tomorrow in preparation for the possibility of Hurricane Dorian making landfall. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
RIVIERA BEACH, FLORIDA - SEPTEMBER 1: Workers place shutters over the windows of a Food Mart store as the owner prepares just in case Hurricane Dorian hits the area on September 1, 2019 in Riviera Beach, Florida. Dorian was projected to make landfall along the Florida coast but now projections have it making a sharp turn to the north as it closes in on Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Tree branches are seen in the road during the approach of Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019 in Nassau, Bahamas. - Hurricane Dorian strengthened into a catastrophic Category 5 storm Sunday, packing 160 mph (267 kph) winds as it was about to slam into the Abaco Islands in the Bahamas, US weather forecasters said."#Dorian is now a category 5 #hurricane with 160 mph sustained winds," the Miami-based National Hurricane Center said in a tweet. "The eyewall of this catastrophic hurricane is about to hit the Abaco Islands with devastating winds," it said.The slow moving storm was expected to linger over the Bahamas through Sunday and much of Monday, dumping up to 25 inches of rain in some areas and unleashing storm surges of 10 to 15-feet, forecasters said. (Photo by Lucy WORBOYS / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUCY WORBOYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Tree branches are seen in the road during the approach of Hurricane Dorian on September 1, 2019 in Nassau, Bahamas. - Hurricane Dorian strengthened into a catastrophic Category 5 storm Sunday, packing 160 mph (267 kph) winds as it was about to slam into the Abaco Islands in the Bahamas, US weather forecasters said."#Dorian is now a category 5 #hurricane with 160 mph sustained winds," the Miami-based National Hurricane Center said in a tweet. "The eyewall of this catastrophic hurricane is about to hit the Abaco Islands with devastating winds," it said.The slow moving storm was expected to linger over the Bahamas through Sunday and much of Monday, dumping up to 25 inches of rain in some areas and unleashing storm surges of 10 to 15-feet, forecasters said. (Photo by Lucy WORBOYS / AFP) (Photo credit should read LUCY WORBOYS/AFP/Getty Images)
The entrance to Wambasso Beach County Park is closed in Wambasso Beach, Florida on September 1, 2019, ahead of Hurricane Dorian. - Hurricane Dorian unleashed "catastrophic conditions" as it hit the northern Bahamas, lashing the low-lying island chain with devastating 180 mph (285 kph) winds, the most intense in its modern history. Florida residents, meanwhile, were bracing for a potentially dangerous brush with the storm as it slowly turns north after passing the Bahamas. (Photo by Adam DelGiudice / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADAM DELGIUDICE/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump receives a briefing at the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) on Hurricane Dorian in Washington, DC, on September 1, 2019. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump receives a briefing at the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) on Hurricane Dorian in Washington, DC, on September 1, 2019. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
ATLANTIC OCEAN - SEPTEMBER 1: In this NOAA GOES-East satellite handout image, Hurricane Dorian, now a Cat. 5 storm, tracks towards the Florida coast taken at 13:20Z September 1, 2019 in the Atlantic Ocean. A hurricane warning is in effect for much of the northwestern Bahamas as it gets hit with 175 mph winds. According to the National Hurricane Center Dorian is predicted to hit the U.S. as a Category 4 storm. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)
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Here’s how you can help:

Donate Money To Reputable Organizations

Monetary aid can go a long way in disaster relief, especially for those far away and unable to volunteer or drop off supplies. Just be wary of crowdfunding links or organizations that seem suspicious. Some fraudulent sites may take advantage of a disaster situation to get people to send credit card information.

Several national and international organizations ― including the Salvation Army, SBP, Heart to Heart International and the International Medical Corps ― are soliciting donations to be funneled to Dorian relief efforts. 

Chef and philanthropist José Andrés and his organization World Central Kitchen are organizing teams at four locations across the Bahamas to cook meals for those hurt by the storm. WCK accepts donations through its website.

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Animals rescued and protected during hurricanes throughout history
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Animals rescued and protected during hurricanes throughout history
Flamingos crowd together in a restroom at Miami's Metro Zoo September 25. More than fifty of the pink birds were herded into the facility for protection from Hurricane Georges, which made landfall in the Florida Keys. The zoo lost most of its birds in a 1992 hurricane, so officials moved the birds as a precaution. Tropical storm-force winds reached up to the Miami metro area, keeping man and beast out of the elements.
GULFPORT, MISSISSIPPI - SEPTEMBER 1, 2005 ? Animal caretaker, Shannon Huyser, touches noses with Freebie the sea lion in Gulfport, Mississippi on September 1, 2005. The animal belongs to the Marine Life Oceanarium in Gulfport and was caught in Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast of the United States on August 29, 2005. The storm left the animal stranded in the backyard of a home in a badly hit neighborhood, blocks from the ocean. Many animals were lost or killed in the massive storm. (Photo by Amy Toensing/Corbis via Getty Images)
Arabian horse Nasar stands in the kitchen of an old farm house in Holt, northern Germany on February 10, 2014. The owner of the horse, medical doctor Stephanie Arndt, took the three-year-old inside the house while hurricane 'Xaver' swept over the region. Since then Nasar like to stay indoors. AFP PHOTO / DPA/ CARSTEN REHDER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read CARSTEN REHDER/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - MAY 22: One of 19 penguins rescued along with two sea otters in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina is released into its old habitat in the Audobon Aquarium of the Americas by volunteers as others swim about after returning to New Orleans following an eight-month refuge in California May 22, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The rescued animals were flown by FedEx back to New Orleans and will return to their home at the Audobon Aquarium of the Americas which is scheduled to reopen May 26. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Odile, this 13 day old horse was born just one day before Hurricane Odile struck Cabo San Lucas in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Her mom died during the hurricane, but she survived and was rescued by an amazing lady.
SANTA CLARA, CA - SEPTEMBER 15: Robert Cadillo stands behind a dog that was displaced from Hurricane Katrina stands on a table at the Humane Society Silicon Valley on September 15, 2005 in Santa Clara California. With almost 1,000 displaced dogs and cats set to come into the bay area for temporary shelter people have been coming forward with cash donations and volunteering time at the shelters around the bay area. Apple Computer co-founder, Steve Wozniak, donated a check for $10,000 to the Humane Society Silicon Valley to support the relief effort. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)
Two of four five-week-old squirrel kittens, cosy up in a blanket at the Sanctuary Wildlife Care centre in Morpeth, Northumberland, after the kittens were tossed from the nest when the aftermath of Hurricane Katia struck Britain. They were rescued and taken to the Sanctuary Wildlife Care centre where feeding is provided every three hours.
NEW ORLEANS - MAY 22: Ron Forman, president and CEO of the Audobon Institute, and volunteer Heidi Munzinger carry two of 19 penguins and two sea otters rescued in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as they arrive New Orleans following an eight-month refuge in California May 22, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The rescued animals were flown by FedEx back to New Orleans and are scheduled to return to their home at the Audobon May 26. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
PUNTA GORDA, FL - AUGUST 20: Richard Naegeli, the former zoo director of Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, nudges an eclectus parrot that survived Hurricane Charley August 20, 2004 in Punta Gorda, Florida. Naegeli has 65 exotic birds on his property that were tossed about by Hurricane Charley but survived. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Covington, UNITED STATES: Hurricane Katrina victim Sondra Sercovich from Mandeville, Louisiana, waits in line for a food stamp application 08 September, 2005, and shows off her new furry friend 'Peanut', a 4-week old baby squirrel she rescued after the hurricane. The animal lover who has 11 cats, 12 tortoises, three dogs, two chameleons, and five children, has been keeping the squirrel warm on her chest, and will be intregrating the squirrel into the family. ,AFP Photo/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A piglet is seen in a car trunk as people get ready to evacuate the area in preparation for the approach of Hurricane Gustav in Batabano, on the southern coast of Cuba, August 30, 2008. Powerful Hurricane Gustav roared toward western Cuba on Saturday with 125 mph (205 kph) winds on its way to the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico after a deadly pass through the Caribbean. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
PUNTA GORDA, FL - AUGUST 20: Richard Naegeli, the former zoo director of Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, holds a baby eclectus parrot that survived Hurricane Charley August 20, 2004 in Punta Gorda, Florida. Naegeli has 65 exotic birds on his property that were tossed about by Hurricane Charley but survived. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
TEXAS - AUGUST 31: In this U.S. Air Force handout, Senior Airman Austin Hellweg, 129th Rescue Squadron special missions aviator, carries a dog and leads a family into an HH-60 Pavehawk for extraction to a safer location during the relief effort for Hurricane Harvey, Aug. 31st, 2017, Beaumont, Texas. The relief efforts have a conglomerate of active, guard and reserve units from all branches aiding the federal government to help Texas recover from Hurricane Harvey. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jordan Castelan/U.S. Air Force via Getty Images)
PUNTA GORDA, FL - AUGUST 20: Richard Naegeli, the former zoo director of Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, points to llamas that survived Hurricane Charley August 20, 2004 in Punta Gorda, Florida. Naegeli has dozens of exotic animals on his property that were tossed about by Hurricane Charley but survived. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Jansen Schamp, a native of Denver, Colorado rescues two dogs at Pine Forrest Elementary School, a shelter that required evacuation after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey reached its grounds in Vidor, Texas, U.S. August 31, 2017. U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Christopher Lindahl/Handout via REUTERS. ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
Members of the navy rescued a bird from the home of residents, who have been stranded after various rivers overflowed their banks after Hurricane Karl hit in Veracruz September 19, 2010. Hurricane Karl hit Mexico's central Gulf Coast on Friday, killing 10 people in a mudslide, and weakened quickly to a tropical depression as it moved inland. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte (MEXICO - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER ANIMALS)
CHAUVIN,LA - SEPTEMBER 24: Timmy Clement guides his horses to higher ground as flood waters rise, due to a levy break September 24, 2005 in Chauvin, Louisiana. Hurricane Rita caused massive damage as it moved across Southern Texas and Louisiana. (Photo by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)
Handlers sit on a pick-up truck with two crocodiles in La Antigua September 23, 2010. According to local media, over 100 crocodiles have been recovered after at least 280 crocodiles escaped from a Mexican refuge near the Gulf of Mexico after heavy flooding caused by Hurricane Karl. REUTERS/Oscar Martinez (MEXICO - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
A puppy stands on a truck carrying people to be evacuated from the area in preparation for the approach of Hurricane Gustav in Batabano, on the southern coast of Cuba, August 30, 2008. Powerful Hurricane Gustav roared toward western Cuba on Saturday with 125 mph (205 kph) winds on its way to the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico after a deadly pass through the Caribbean. REUTERS/Claudia Daut (CUBA)
A pet belonging to evacuees sits in a crate at the Delco Center in east Austin Thursday, August 31, 2017. Austin Animal Center has been assisting in caring for the animals since the shelter opened to Hurricane Harvey evacuees. / AFP PHOTO / SUZANNE CORDEIRO (Photo credit should read SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - SEPTEMBER 10: Glen Ladner of Arkansans for Animals Inc. brings several exotic birds out of a home in Lake Forest Estates September 10, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Volunteers have found thousands of pets ranging from dogs and cats to pigs and goats and are taking them to temporary shelters near New Orleans to be cleaned and fed. (Photo by Lawrence Jenkins/Getty Images)
A pet belonging to evacuees sits in a crate at the Delco Center in east Austin Thursday, August 31, 2017. Austin Animal Center has been assisting in caring for the animals since the shelter opened to Hurricane Harvey evacuees. / AFP PHOTO / SUZANNE CORDEIRO (Photo credit should read SUZANNE CORDEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2002: Abandoned dogs rescued from the floodwaters ride on the bow of a fishing boat in the submerged Mid-City district of New Orleans, La. Residents who evacuated the Big Easy in the wake of Hurricane Katrina were not allowed to take their animals along, so many of them were forced to choose between remaining at their barely-habitable homes or leaving their beloved pets behind. (Photo by Corey Sipkin/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - MAY 22: One of 19 penguins rescued along with two sea otters in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina walks on the tarmac after returning to New Orleans following an eight month refuge in California May 22, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The rescued animals were flown by FedEx back to New Orleans and will return to their home at the Audobon Aquarium of the Americas which is scheduled to reopen May 26. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
NBC NEWS -- Pictured: 'Katrina Baby Dolphins' --Two of the dolphins washed out to sea from their aquarium in Gulfport, Mississippi during hurricane Katrina had babies.They are 7 and 9 days old and are now living in a habitat at the Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas. Photos taken on April 13, 2007 (Photo by AJ Goodwin/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Greg Austin, of Avon, North Carolina, makes the catch of the day as he rescues a carp from a drainage ditch along Hwy 12, Monday, August 29, 2011. Several of the large fish were washed out of a local pond during the storm surge from Hurricane Irene. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA - AUGUST 28: This injured gull sat near an area that suffered some minor flooding. Two locals later rescued the bird that had an injured wing. The day after Irene hit Virginia beach we surveyed the area. (Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA - AUGUST 28: After finding an injured gull that sat near an area that suffered some minor flooding, Greg Petersen wrapped the bird for transport to an animal rescue facility. The bird had an injured wing. The day after Irene hit Virginia beach we surveyed the area. (Photo by Michael Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A dolphin that was stranded on the beach during Hurricane Irene gets help by Crew Hayes, left to right, Jeff Hayes, Damon Ahrendt, Valerie Real and Brad Doerr along the beach in Avon, North Carolina, U.S., on Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011. Hurricane Irene weakened to a tropical storm and made landfall in New York City with winds of 65 miles (105 kilometers) an hour after knocking out power on Long Island and causing flooding in New Jersey. Photographer: Ted Richardson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Angie Kelly helps remove dogs from enclosures behind her house in Pearlington, Mississippi, on Wednesday July 25, 2012. Hancock County officials confiscated 41 dogs from the woman's house on Wednesday. Kelly said she has been caring for abandoned dogs since Hurricane Katrina. (John Fitzhugh/Biloxi Sun Herald/MCT via Getty Images)
POYDRAS, LA - SEPTEMBER 04: A wounded horse, named Mooch, recovers at Poydras Arena after being rescued from being stuck in the mud from Hurricane Isaac flooding in Plaquemines Parish on September 4, 2012 in Poydras, Louisiana. Members of the Louisiana State University agricultural and veterinary staff and local volunteers are rescuing stranded horses in Plaquemines Parish. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Stephanie Arndt pets her Arabian horse Nasar as they stand in the living room of her old farm house in Holt, northern Germany on February 10, 2014. The owner of the horse, medical doctor Stephanie Arndt, took the three-year-old inside the house while hurricane 'Xaver' swept over the region. Since then Nasar like to stay indoors. AFP PHOTO / DPA/ CARSTEN REHDER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read CARSTEN REHDER/AFP/Getty Images)
Arabian horse Nasar stands in the corridor of an old farm house in Holt, northern Germany on February 10, 2014. The owner of the horse, medical doctor Stephanie Arndt, took the three-year-old inside the house while hurricane 'Xaver' swept over the region. Since then Nasar like to stay indoors. AFP PHOTO / DPA/ CARSTEN REHDER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read CARSTEN REHDER/AFP/Getty Images)
LUMBERTON, NC - OCTOBER 12: A man rescues a dog from floodwaters on October 12, 2016 in Lumberton, North Carolina. Hurricane Matthew's heavy rains ended over the weekend, but flooding is still expected for days in North Carolina. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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Make Meaningful Supply Donations

During disaster situations, it’s key to determine what supplies are actually needed and where to donate them so organizations aren’t burdened with superfluous good.

The city of Miami is organizing a donation drive in conjunction with its fire department and local churches. The #BahamaStrong coalition is asking for donations of:

  • Water
  • Canned goods
  • Can openers
  • Mosquito spray
  • Sunscreen
  • Diapers
  • Baby formula
  • First-aid items
  • Flashlights
  • Batteries
  • Small generators

A list of drop-off locations can be found on the city’s website.

Florida state Rep. Shevrin Jones (D) is also getting the word out about a donation drive run by the Miami Dade Community Emergency Operations Center.

In addition to monetary aid, the Bahamas Red Cross is asking for donations of non-perishable goods, baby supplies, cleaning items and bedding.

Register To Volunteer

For those able to give their time, consider volunteering to help in relief efforts. Bahamas Red Cross is accepting volunteer applications, as is disaster relief organization All Hands and Hearts. As All Hands and Hearts notes on its website, relief organizations are still assessing the needs on the ground ― so don’t book airline tickets to the islands until you know where you’ll be needed.

15 PHOTOS
15 of the deadliest American hurricanes ever
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15 of the deadliest American hurricanes ever

Hurricane Hugo, 1989: 21 deaths

Hurricane Hugo made landfall as a Category 4 storm in South Carolina. It caused 21 deaths in the US and resulted in $7.1 billion of damage. At the time, it was the costliest storm in US history.

Photo courtesy: Getty

Tropical Storm Allison, 2001: 41 deaths

While not an official hurricane, Allison clocks in as the costliest and deadliest tropical storm in US history, causing 41 deaths and costing more than $5 billion in damage. The storm started over the Gulf of Mexico near Texas, then traveled east, causing floods like the one pictured here in Houston, Texas.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Hurricane Irene, 2011: 56 deaths

Hurricane Irene, the first storm to hit the US since Ike three years earlier, made landfall in North Carolina as a Category 1 storm. The storm eventually made its way up to New York City, bringing flooding -- like the kind pictured here in Puerto Rico -- and causing $7.3 billion in damage overall.

Photo courtesy: AP

Hurricane Floyd, 1999: 57 deaths

Hurricane Floyd was a catastrophic storm because of the rain it brought along. The rain caused extreme flooding from North Carolina on up as the Category 2 storm traveled up the East Coast.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Great Atlantic Hurricane, 1944: 64 deaths

The Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944 was also devastating to New England, with 64 deaths and more than $100 million in damage. The storm was a Category 3 as it sped up the coast, hitting the Carolinas, Rhode Island, and Long Island before downgrading to a Category 2 in Maine.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Hurricane Agnes, 1972: 122 deaths

Hurricane Agnes, as seen in this image made it all the way inland to Pennsylvania. Although it was only a Category 1 storm (with winds from 74-95 mph), it still caused 122 deaths and caused $2.1 billion in damage.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Hurricane Ike, 2008: 195 deaths

The third costliest storm in US history, with $29.5 billion in damage, occurred in September 2008. Starting off the west coast of Africa, Hurricane Ike made its way over the Caribbean and into the Gulf, making US landfall in Texas as a Category 2 storm

Photo courtesy: Reuters

Hurricane Camille, 1969: 256 deaths

Hurricane Camille formed in the Gulf of Mexico and hit Mississippi as a Category 5 storm. Camille caused more than 256 deaths and clocks in as the second most intense hurricane to hit the US.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

New England, 1938: 256 deaths

Nicknamed "Long Island Express," the storm hit Puerto Rico as a Category 5 storm before charging north and hitting Long Island, New York and Connecticut as a Category 3 hurricane. The storm was responsible for more than 256 deaths.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Hurricane Sandy, 2012: 285 deaths

With $71.4 billion in damage, Hurricane Sandy was the second costliest hurricane in US history. The Category 1 storm pummeled New York City, flooding the city's transportation systems and leaving thousands of homes destroyed.

It's looking more and more like Hurricane Joaquin won't make landfall in the US and join the list of most horrific storms in US history.

Photo courtesy: AP

Hurricane Audrey, 1957: 416 deaths

The U.S. started naming storms with women's names starting in 1953. Hurricane Audrey, the first storm of the 1957 hurricane season was the deadliest of the 1950s. It originated in the Gulf of Mexico, making landfall in Texas as a Category 4 storm. This image of the storm shows just how far hurricane imaging has come.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Atlantic-Gulf, 1919: 600 to 900 deaths

This Category 4 storm swept into the Gulf of Mexico right under Key West, Florida(pictured), landing as a Category 3 storm in Corpus Christi, Texas. Anywhere from 600 to 900 people died in that storm.

Hurricane Katrina, 2005: 1,200 deaths

Hurricane Katrina is arguably the most notorious storm of the 21st century. The storm made landfall as a Category 5 near Miami before striking Louisiana as a Category 3 storm. Katrina was the third deadliest, and costliest hurricane in U.S. history with more than 1,200 deaths and $108 billion in damage.

Photo courtesy: Reuters

San Felipe Okeechobee, 1928: 2,500 deaths

This hurricane was the second deadliest in US history, with more than 2,500 deaths. The Category 4 storm made landfall in Palm Beach on September 10, 1928. Puerto Rico got hit hard as well, with winds at 144 mph.

Photo courtesy: NOAA

Galveston, Texas in 1900: 8,000 to 12,000 deaths

The deadliest hurricane in US history happened at the turn of the 20th century. The Category 4 of 5 hurricane -- with winds anywhere from 130-156 mph -- made landfall in Galveston, Texas (pictured), then headed north through the Great Plains. Anywhere from 8,000 to 12,000 people died in the storm.

Photo courtesy: Creative Commons

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