Scientist who worked at NASA shuts down man on dating app who asked if she was a receptionist

A scientist who used to intern at NASA shut down a man on a dating app who assumed she was a receptionist for the agency.

Dr. Lauren McKeown, who has a Ph.D. in planetary science from Trinity College in Dublin, took to Twitter on Aug. 14 to share a conversation she recently had with a man named Mikey on the popular dating app Hinge.

On her profile, McKeown had listed that the "dorkiest" thing about her is that she worked at NASA, a prompt which Mikey responded to, saying that the job was "cool" and joked that he wanted to tell his parents about her.

McKeown then matched with the man and invited him to start the chat, which is when he asked, "So what are you, like the receptionist?"

"[Just kidding] you look reasonably smart," he followed up.

In a response that has since been retweeted over 17,500 times and racked up more than 180,000 likes, McKeown articulately let the bachelor know she did not appreciate his comments.

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Cool NASA pics
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Cool NASA pics
First images captured of Pluto's moons by New Horizons probe in 2015. 
Of all the planets NASA has explored, none have matched the dynamic complexity of our own. Earth is constantly changing, and NASA are working constantly to explore and understand the planet on scales from local to global. This time-lapse shows a composite for the eastern hemisphere from January 18 to July 25, 2014. Subtle changes in the snow and vegetation cover of the land vie for attention with a dynamic, swirling layer of clouds that are constantly present and constantly moving. Read more at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=84214&src=youtube
This image shows the VIIRS composite for the eastern hemisphere on March 30, 2014.

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 24 May 2014

"Hubble Sees Flickering Light Display on Saturn - Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured new images of the dancing auroral lights at Saturn’s north pole. Taken from Hubble’s perspective in orbit around the Earth, these images provide a detailed look at Saturn’s stormy aurorae — revealing previously unseen dynamics in the choreography of the auroral glow. The cause of the changing patterns in Saturn's aurorae is an ongoing mystery in planetary science. These ultraviolet images, taken by Hubble’s super-sensitive Advanced Camera for Surveys, add new insight by capturing moments when Saturn’s magnetic field is affected by bursts of particles streaming out from the sun."

Image Credit: European Space Agency

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 1 June 2014

"This image shot by astronauts aboard the International Space Station is a striking view of Sarychev volcano (Russia's Kuril Islands, northeast of Japan) in an early stage of eruption on June 12, 2009. Sarychev Peak is one of the most active volcanoes in the Kuril Island chain and is located on the northwestern end of Matua Island."
 

Image Credit: NASA

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 6 June 2014

"Astronaut Reid Wiseman, aboard the International Space Station, shared this image on Twitter on Friday, June 6, 2014 wishing everyone a great weekend. He shared that this image shows 'Trinidad and Tobago in the evening sun.'

Image Credit: NASA

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 8 May 2014 

"It's a small world! The phrase "encircling the Earth" has a double entendre flavor to it in this picture showing all six Expedition 39 crew members in the Kibo module around a globe while actually orbiting the "real thing" aboard the International Space Station. Clockwise from his position are Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Tyurin of Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Steve Swanson and Rick Mastracchio of NASA and Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos."

Image Credit: NASA

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 11 June 2014

"An adult osprey returns home to its nest built on a platform in a parking lot at our Kennedy Space Center, carrying a fish in its talons. In the background is the 12,300-square-foot NASA logo painted on the side of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB)."

Image Credit: NASA/Daniel Casper

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 10 June 2014

"The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 7:42 a.m. EDT on June 10, 2014. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory – which typically observes the entire sun 24 hours a day -- captured images of the flare. It is seen bursting off the left limb of the sun in this image captured by SDO and is shown in a blend of two wavelengths of light: 171 and 131 angstroms, colorized in gold and red, respectively."

Image Credit: NASA/SDO/Goddard/Wiessinger

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 30 May 2014

"Violent Birth Announcement from an Infant Star - This Hubble image shows IRAS 14568-6304, a young star that is cloaked in a haze of golden gas and dust. It appears to be embedded within an intriguing swoosh of dark sky, which curves through the image and obscures the sky behind."

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgements: R. Sahai, NASA JPL/ Serge Meunier

 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 29 May 2014

"The 'Serpent' Star-forming Cloud Hatches New Stars - Within the swaddling dust of the Serpens Cloud Core, astronomers are studying one of the youngest collections of stars ever seen in our galaxy."

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/2MASS

 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 11 May 2014

"IceBridge Concludes Arctic Field Campaign - Researchers with our Operation IceBridge have completed another successful Arctic field campaign. On May 23, NASA's P-3 research aircraft left Thule Air Base, Greenland, and returned to Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia marking the end of 11 weeks of polar research." This image is a view of mountains and sea ice near Thule Air Base, Greenland, from the NASA P-3 on May 6, 2014."

Image Credit: NASA/Michael

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 14 May 2014

"Landing time! The Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft is seen as it lands with Expedition 39 Commander Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, May 14, 2014."


Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 5 May 2104

"Here's what happens when galaxies collide - as seen by our Chandra X-Ray Observatory: M51 is a spiral galaxy, about 30 million light years away, that is in the process of merging with a smaller galaxy seen to its upper left. This image is part of a "quartet of galaxies" collaboration of professional and amateur astronomers that combines optical data from amateur telescopes with data from the archives of NASA missions."
 
Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Detlef Hartmann; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech 
 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 19 April 2014

"Researchers were greatly surprised to discover 3-million-year-old landscape beneath Greenland Ice Sheet! The finding provides strong evidence that the Greenland Ice Sheet has persisted much longer than previously known, enduring through many past periods of global warming."
 
Image Credit: Joshua Brown, University of Vermont 
 
 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 16 April 2014

"The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station. The steep walls of the Colorado River canyon and its many side canyons make an intricate landscape that contrasts with the dark green, forested plateau to the north and south. "
 
Image Credit: NASA 
 
 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 16 April 2014

"Eclipse! From open prairie land on the 1625-acre Johnson Space Center site, one of our photographers took this multi-frame composite image of the so-called "Blood Moon" lunar eclipse in the early hours of April 15. During these rare events, the full moon rapidly darkens and then glows red as it enters the Earth's shadow."
 
Image Credit: NASA 

 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 26 March 2014

"Off into Space! This long exposure photograph shows the flight path of the Soyuz TMA-12M rocket as it launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan yesterday. The rocket carried Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos to the International Space Station."
 
Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

 
 

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 2 March 2014

"Tonight, #Gravity is up for awards at the#Oscars2014 & we're sharing #RealGravity images from living & working in space. First up is this stunning picture where the bright sun greets the International Space Station in this Nov. 22, 2009 scene from the Russian section of the orbital outpost."

Image Credit: NASA

 

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 2 February 2014

"This view of the Crab Nebula in visible light comes from the Hubble Space Telescope and spans 12 light-years. The supernova remnant, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Taurus, is among the best-studied objects in the sky."
 
Image Credit: NASA/ESA/ASU/J. Hester 
 

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 24 January 2014

"Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy donned their Russian Orlan spacesuits for a "dry run" dress rehearsal to test the suits in advance of Monday's spacewalk to reinstall a pair of cameras as part of a commercial endeavor between a Canadian firm and the Russian Federal Space Agency. The cameras will be used to downlink Earth imagery to Internet-based subscribers. The two cosmonauts also plan to retrieve an experiment package housed on the Zvezda service module's hull."
 
Image Credit: NASA

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 31 December 2013

"Quiet Corona and Upper Transition Region of the Sun: This image, taken on Dec. 31, 2013 by the AIA instrument on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) at 171 Angstrom, shows the current conditions of the quiet corona and upper transition region of the Sun on the last day of 2013."

Image Credit: NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 27 December 2013

"On Dec. 24, 2013, NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, Expedition 38 Flight Engineer, participates in the second of two U.S. spacewalks, spread over a four-day period, which were designed to allow the crew to change out a faulty water pump on the exterior of the Earth-orbiting International Space Station. He was joined on both spacewalks by NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, whose image shows up in Hopkins' helmet visor."

Image Credit: NASA

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 22 May 2014

"On Earth Day this year, NASA asked people all around the world a simple question - "Where are you on Earth Right Now?"We asked people to answer the question on social media, with a selfie. The goal was to use each picture as a pixel in the creation of a "Global Selfie" - a mosaic image that would look like Earth appeared from space on Earth Day. The mosaic was made with 36,422 individual images that were posted to social media sites on or around Earth Day, April 22, 2014."
 
Image Credit: NASA

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 2 March 2014

"A crescent moon and Earth's horizon are featured in this nighttime image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station. Over the weekend, the station’s residents will have some free time to relax, speak with family members back on Earth and take care of weekly housekeeping chores. They’ll also have a chance to catch up on the action at the World Cup 2014 games in Brazil."

Image Credit: NASA
 

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 15 June 2014

"Our scientists have created a new recipe that captures key flavors of the brownish-orange atmosphere around Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. The recipe is used for lab experiments designed to simulate Titan’s chemistry." This Cassini image from 2012 shows Titan and its parent planet Saturn."

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 16 June 2014

"Cracks in Pluto's Moon Could Indicate it Once Had an Underground Ocean: If the icy surface of Pluto's giant moon Charon is cracked, analysis of the fractures could reveal if its interior was warm, perhaps warm enough to have maintained a subterranean ocean of liquid water, according to a new NASA-funded study."

Image Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Bacon (STScI)

 

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 26 May 2014

"All-American Salute - Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, leaps from the lunar surface as he salutes the United States flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture."

Image Credit: NASA

Posted on NASA's Instagram on 9 May 2014

"Spacewalk Training in the Pool! In November 2012, astronaut Reid Wiseman attired in training versions of their spacesuits, submerged in the waters of the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory near Johnson Space Center in Houston."

Image Credit: NASA 

Posted to NASA's Instagram on 13 June 2014

"Hubble Eyes Golden Rings of Star Formation Taking center stage in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 3081, set against an assortment of glittering galaxies in the distance. Located in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent), NGC 3081 is located over 86 million light-years from us."

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; acknowledgement: R. Buta (University of Alabama)

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"Smart enough to know at least that judging a woman's intelligence based on her appearance might not be the best way to initiate conversation," she wrote. "PS. my mother is a primary school receptionist and is the wisest, most inspirational, and kindest person I know. So much so in fact that my PhD. thesis in planetary science is dedicated to her."

"And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why I am single," McKeown wrote of the exchange.

Immediately, multiple scientists jumped in and related to McKeown's experience as a woman in the field.

"When I started working at a new NASA facility, someone assumed I needed directions and I was pointed in the direction of the gift shop..." wrote an engineer named Megan, whose Twitter bio says she formerly worked at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center.

"Once had a guy break up with me after I gave him a tour of where I was working on a Mars mission because he said he thought I was lying about working for NASA and he has to be the smarter one in the relationship," wrote Keri Bean, a systems engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Wtf."

Even Hinge jumped into McKeown's replies, writing, "Yikes. Hinge has a zero tolerance policy for behavior like this. We're on it. And while we're at it, your next Hinge date is on us. DM us! We hope you find someone worth deleting Hinge for soon."

In a subsequent tweet, the scientist expressed shock over how much attention the messages had received.

"What I thought would give a few people a laugh has really made its way around the world," she wrote. "Thanks to everyone who engaged in this important topic."

"...and to the lads taking my tweet as an invite for marriage proposals in my inbox, you (maaaaay) have missed the point," she added, with a laughing emoji.

50 PHOTOS
50 photos to mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing
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50 photos to mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing
This 19 November 1969 file photo released by NASA shows one of the astronauts of the Apollo 12 space mission conducting experiment on the moon's surface with a camera. An other astronaut is reflected in his helmet. An Apollo / Saturn V space vehicle launched the Apollo 12 astronauts Charles "Pete" Conrad, Jr., commander, Richard F. Gordon, command module pilot, and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot from the Kennedy Space Center, on November 14, 1969, on the Apollo 12 United States' second manned lunar landing mission. AFP PHOTO NASA (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
376713 09: (FILE PHOTO) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has named these three astronauts as the prime crew of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Left to right, are Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
Views of Carol Armstrong, wife of American astronaut, Neil Armstrong of the Apollo 11 mission, sitting on floor with 2 sons, attentively watching T.V. at home as lunar module lands on the moon. (Photo by Vernon Merritt III/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)
TS Bremen Arrives-(North German Lloyd Liner) Pier 92 West 52nd St, North River Mothers and their children read the Daily News and all about the Moon Men and the landing of Apollo 11. Joan Lambele of Manchester, New Hampshire-Mrs. Renate Bugenhagen of Georgia and Mrs. Halla Nicolson of East Setauket, L. I. all have been in Germany for from 3 months to 39 months and are now returning to their homes with their children. (Photo By: Fred Morgan/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
24th July 1969: American statesman Richard Nixon, the 37th President of the United States, with American astronauts, (from left), Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, after the astronauts' successful moon-landing expedition. They are separated by a quarantine window. (Photo by Keystone/CNP/Getty Images)
Lunar Module Pilot Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin Jr prepares to deploy part of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASAP) during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, 20th July 1969. In his left hand is the Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) and in his right, the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR3). The photograph was taken by Commander Neil Armstrong with a 70mm lunar surface camera. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
376713 12: (FILE PHOTO) Astronaut Neil Armstrong smiles inside the Lunar Module July 20, 1969. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
A group of children sit on a GMC truck in Central Park to watch the televised broadcast of the Apollo 11 moon landiing, New York, New York. July 20, 1969. (Photo by Tim Boxer/Getty Images)
The United States flag is planted on the surface of the Moon by the astronauts of NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, as seen from inside the Lunar Module the 'Eagle', 20th July 1969. In the background is the black and white lunar surface television camera which televised astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin Jr during their EVA (extravehicular activity). (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
From left: Astronauts Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, Jr. Neil Alden Armstrong, and Michael Collins stand to the right of New York City Mayor John V. Lindsay's in front of City Hall in New York City during celebrations for the Apollo 11 moon landing, August 1969. An unidentified man speaks at the podium. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin, the crew of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing mission, who are are subjected to a period of quarantine upon their return to earth, hold a conversation with President Richard Nixon in the United States on July 24, 1969. (Photo by NASA/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
A television screen grab from a CBS News Special Report: shows an Apollo 11 astronaut on the moon, July 1969. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
A television screen grab shows the members of mission control waving flags and celebrating the splashdown and return of the crew of the Apollo 11, Texas, July 1969. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
President Richard M. Nixon talking to Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Alden Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. in quarantine after walking on the moon due to fears of unknown pathogens they might have been exposed to. Juy 24, 1969. Image taken off screen. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
(AUSTRALIA OUT) Crowds gather around a television set at Mascot Airport in Sydney to watch the broadcast of American astronaut Neil Armstrong becoming the first man to land on the moon, 21 July 1969. SMH Picture by TREVOR DALLEN astronaut, Neil Armstrong, NASA, Apollo landing, mission,man on the moon, American, space, spectators, television, tv, set, viewers, crowd, crowds, viewing, watching, Sydney Airport, travellers, lounge, pilots, black and white, black & white, 1960s, sixties, (Photo by Fairfax Media/Fairfax Media via Getty Images)
(AUSTRALIA OUT) Lunchtime crowds gather at the Hyde Park Hotel in Sydney to watch a televised broadcast of American astronaut Neil Armstrong landing on the moon, 21 July 1969. SMH Picture by R L STEWART (Photo by Fairfax Media/Fairfax Media via Getty Images)
Lunar Module Pilot Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin standing next to the Solar Wind Composition experiment, part of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASAP), at Tranquility Base on the surface of the Moon, during NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, July 1969. The Lunar Module or 'Eagle' is behind him. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
American broadcast journalist and TV news anchor Walter Cronkite keeps his eyes on his monitor as NASA's Apollo 11 mission touches down on the moon, July 20, 1969. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
View of the crowd gathered in Central Park to watch the televised broadcast of the Apollo 11 moon landiing, New York, New York, July 20, 1969. (Photo by Tim Boxer/Getty Images)
376713 25: (File Photo) The December 1969 Cover Of National Geographic Depicts The Famous Photograph Of Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Taken By Neil Armstrong On The Surface Of The Moon. The 30Th Anniversary Of The Apollo 11 Moon Landing Mission Is Celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo By Getty Images)
A northeasterly low-oblique view of a crater on the far side of the Moon, taken from the spacecraft during NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, July 1969. The centre of the image is located at around 167 degrees east longitude and 6 degrees north latitude, just east of the International Astronomical Union crater Number 220. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
A television screen grab from a CBS News Special Report: shows the Apollo 11 astronauts on the moon, July 1969. (Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images)
The Lunar Module or 'Eagle' on the Moon with the Earth visible behind it, during NASA's Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, July 1969. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
376713 06: (FILE PHOTO) New York City welcomes the Apollo 11 crew in a showering of ticker tape down Broadway and Park Avenue August 13, 1969 in a parade termed as the largest in the city's history. Pictured in the lead car, from the right, are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. The three astronauts teamed for the first manned lunar landing on July 20, 1969. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
376713 21: (FILE PHOTO) The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle lifts off July 16, 1969 from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex in Florida. The space craft was injected into lunar orbit on July 19, 1969 with Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. on board. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
376713 13: (FILE PHOTO) U.S. Navy pararescueman Lt. Clancey Hatleberg disinfects Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. after getting into the life raft during recovery operations today at the completion of their successful lunar landing mission. The space pilots donned biological isolation garments in their spacecraft. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
While their father, Apollo II astronaut Buzz Aldrin is busy preparing for the July 16th blastoff for the historical landing on the moon, son Michael and daughter Janice, 11, are concerned with more earthly matters, such as repairing Jan's bicycle tire which she punctured with a tack.
376713 20: (FILE PHOTO) The deployment of scientific experiments by Astronaut Edwin Aldrin Jr. is photographed by Astronaut Neil Armstrong. Man's first landing on the Moon occurred July 20, 1969 as Lunar Module "Eagle" touched down gently on the Sea of Tranquility on the east side of the Moon. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. (Photo by NASA/Newsmakers)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 15: A technician helps Collins from a spacecraft after he and the other two Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin �Buzz� Aldrin, had taken part in the launch countdown demonstration test at Launch Complex 39 at the Kennedy Space Centre, Cape Canaveral, Florida. Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, was launched on 16th July 1969 and Armstrong and Aldrin became the first and second men to walk on the Moon on 20th July 1969. Collins, the Command Module pilot, remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. Poses For A Photograph Beside The Deployed Flag Of The United States. The Lunar Module Is On The Left. Man's First Landing On The Moon Occurred Today At 4:17 P.M. July 20, 1969 As Lunar Module "Eagle" Touched Down Gently On The Sea Of Tranquility On The East Side Of The Moon. The Lm (Lunar Module) Landed On The Moon On July 20, 1969 And Returned To The Command Module On July 21. The Command Module Left Lunar Orbit On July 22 And Returned To Earth On July 24, 1969. Apollo 11 Splashed Down In The Pacific Ocean On 24 July 1969 At 12:50:35 P.M. Edt After A Mission Elapsed Time Of 195 Hrs, 18 Mins, 35 Secs. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
Astronauts Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong near Wall Street during a parade in New York City following their moon landing. August 13, 1969. (Photo by Barney Stein/New York Post Archives /(c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)
Daily News front page August 18, 1969, Headline: NEIL, BUZZ, MIKE, TOWN IS YOURS - Landing Here Today... Encircling moon globe, the Apollo 11 crew flash their best moonbeaming smiles. They're (l to r.) Buzz Aldrin, Mike Collins and Neil Armstrong. Today they bathe New York in moonglow as city hails them with ticker-tape parade. (Photo By: /NY Daily News via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 15: Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong and Edwin �Buzz� Aldrin, dressed in spacesuits, are standing in front of a training Lunar Module. Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, was launched on 16th July 1969 and Armstrong and Aldrin became the first and second men to walk on the Moon on 20th July 1969. Collins, the Command Module pilot, remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Apollio 11 Parade, The moon men get a warm welcome home as New Yorkers pile into the street to celebrate the Apollo 11 homecoming at the ticker-tape parade. (Photo By: Dan Farrell/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
Apollo 11 Splashdown, Watching the finish of man's greatest voyage of exploration. (Photo By: John Pedin/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Muscovites read the July 21st edition of the Soviet newspaper Izvestia which played the Apollo 11 moon landing story on the front page, but beneath a story of the 20th year of Communist rule in Poland and a report on Russia's own Luna 15 spacecraft. The Apollo picture (arrow) shows the astronauts on the moon.
American engineer, astronaut, and Command Pilot Buzz Aldrin on the spaceflight Apollo 11, July 1969; Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, was launched on 16th July 1969 and Neil Armstrong and Aldrin became the first and second men to walk on the Moon on 20th July 1969. The third member of the crew, Command Module pilot Michael Collins, remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface. Aldrin was the Lunar Module pilot on the mission. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
The moon landing headlines on various newspapers including the International Herald Tribune, l'Humanite and Le Figaro.
In a park, viewers gather around to watch the television broadcast of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Hong Kong, July 1969. (Photo by PhotoQuest/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - JULY 21: Neil Armstrong's first step on the Moon on July 21, 1969. (Photo by NASA/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
HYANNIS, MA - JULY 20: Customers line up outside Willoughby's in Hyannis, MA to get their Sunday newspapers on July 20, 1969 - the day of the Apollo 11 moon landing. (Photo by Joe Dennehy/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
20th July 1969: American astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin Jnr steps onto the lunar surface from the Apollo 11 lunar module to become the second man to walk on the moon. (Photo by Neil Armstrong/MPI/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) 7/17/1969- Space Center, Houston, TX- Overall view of activity in Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, on the second day of the Apollo II lunar landing mission. A picture of astronaut Neil A. Armstrong was being transmitted from the color TV camera aboard the Apollo II spacecraft as it traveled toward the moon. The spacecraft was about 130,000 mautical miles from earth when this photo was taken.
(Original Caption) Atop a column of flame, the Apollo 11 space vehicle thrusts towards a rendezvous with the moon. Liftoff occurred at 9:32 A.M. EDT at pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center, signaling the start of man's first lunar landing mission.
381858 01: 30Th Anniversary Of Apollo 11 Landing On The Moon (4 Of 20): Vice President Spiro Agnew And Former President Lyndon Johnson View The Liftoff Of Apollo 11 From The Stands Located At The Kennedy Space Center Vip Viewing Site. The Apollo 11 Saturn V Space Vehicle Lifted Off On July 16, 1969 And Was Injected Into Lunar Orbit On July 19 With Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins And Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., At 9:32 A.M. Edt July 16, 1969, From Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex In Florida. The Lm (Lunar Module) Landed On The Moon On July 20, 1969 And Returned To The Command Module On July 21. The Command Module Left Lunar Orbit On July 22 And Returned To Earth On July 24, 1969. Apollo 11 Splashed Down In The Pacific Ocean On 24 July 1969 At 12:50:35 P.M. Edt After A Mission Elapsed Time Of 195 Hrs, 18 Mins, 35 Secs. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
View of eight frames of film shows American astronaut (and future politician) Neil Armstrong as he descends a ladder from the lunar landing module (the shadow of which is visible) to the surface of the Moon during NASA's Apollo 11 lunar mission, July 16, 1969. (Photo by NASA/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images/Getty Images)
Lunar Module pilot Buzz Aldrin charged with the responsibility of setting Apollo-11's LEM down on target on the moon, goes over moon charts of proposed landing areas during a training session, as shown here.
UNITED STATES - APRIL 15: Aldrin (front) is using a scoop to collect surface samples while Armstrong is taking pictures during a practice session of their lunar activities at the Manned Spacecraft Centre (now Johnson Space Centre) Houston, Texas. Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, was launched on 16th July 1969 and Armstrong and Aldrin became the first and second men to walk on the Moon on 20th July 1969. The third member of the Apollo 11 crew was Michael Collins, who remained in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) "Moon Man." Space Center, Houston: Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong seems the picture of confidence at the moment. Armstrong, in training for the projected Apollo 11 lunar landing, is taking a break at the Space Center in Houston during the first full dress rehearsal of activities he is to perform on the moon.
Manned Spaceflight Center, Tx.: Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins (from right), scheduled to make the nation's first landing on the moon, pose in front of a full-scale mockup of the lunar landing vehicle in which Armstrong and Aldrin will descend to the moon's surface. The mission, Apollo 11 may be attempted as early as July of this year.
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