Extreme Minimalists: From her clothes to her furniture, this woman lives her entire life in blue

Welcome to Extreme Minimalists, which shares the stories of individuals who live on less. Check back every week for a new episode, from a family of three living in a van to a woman who lives with absolutely zero furniture!

For over 20 years, Valeria McCulloch has been dressing her life in a very specific shade of blue. From her shoes to her clothes to even the furniture in her home, the Miami resident is dedicated to surrounding herself in the hue -- and for a specific reason. 

"Blue has been known psychologically to transmit peace and serenity," she said to AOL Lifestyle. "It's a comforting hue -- you know that you're protected by the sky or the sea."

VALBLV, as she is nicknamed, first fell in love with the color when she began her journey with art. "When I started studying art, I started experimenting with doing a lot of collage. By far, the most transcendental color to me was blue." Since then, she's emulated the shade in her everyday lifestyle.

"When I first found this place, it was a blank canvas," she said about decorating her home. "It took me months to find all the pieces together," she relayed.

"Some people think it's weird, but the people that truly know different parts of you and are your friends think it's part of being you." See more of Valeria's love of the color in the video above!  

RELATED: Scroll through below to see another kind of minimalist lifestyle 

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Japanese minimalist movement
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Japanese minimalist movement
Utensils lie in a kitchen drawer in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Naoki Numahata talks to his two-and-a-half year old daughter Ei in their living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki stores away her futon mattress in her apartment in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kettle sits on a cooker in the kitchen of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, sits in the family living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kitchen counter is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Books sit on a bookshelf in the home of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
An open kitchen drawer is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toothbrushes are seen in the bathroom of the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A sponge hangs in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toys belonging to two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, are scattered across the floor in her family's living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A razor and toothbrush lie in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The contents of the fridge is seen at the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Katsuya Toyoda demonstrates how he sleeps in his room in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A yoga mat and shorts are seen in the room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Belongings lie in a drawer in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Clothes hang in the wardrobe of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Kitchen utensils hang in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The bathroom cupboard of minimalist Fumio Sasaki is seen in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A tray lies on a table in the living room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A laptop belonging to minimalist Fumio Sasaki sits on his desk in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "MINIMALISM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Minimalist Fumio Sasaki uses a wet wipe to clean the floor in his room in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A living room window is seen in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Soap sits in a dish at the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Glasses and spices sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki demonstrates where she reads in her room in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Clothes hang in a wardrobe in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Glasses and cups sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
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