Barack Obama reveals his summer reading list for 2019

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As summer comes to a close, Barack Obama is looking back on his best reads of the season. The former U.S. president shared his summer reading list on Facebook and Instagram on Wednesday night, filled with over 11 strong recommendations. The books range in genre, from a spy thriller to historical fiction, and authors span from Pulitzer Prize Winners to those who were only recently published.

"It's August, so I wanted to let you know about a few books I've been reading this summer, in case you're looking for some suggestions," Obama wrote.

"To start, you can't go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison. Beloved, Song of Solomon, The Bluest Eye, Sula, everything else — they're transcendent, all of them. You’ll be glad you read them."

Toni Morrison died last week on Aug. 6 at the age of 88. She's the author of 11 novels, a collection of essays, three children's books, a play and a short story—her career spanned over 6 decades. In 1993, she became the first African-American woman to receive a Nobel Prize for her literature, and in 2012, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by none other than Obama.

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Barack Obama gives Toni Morrison Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012
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Barack Obama gives Toni Morrison Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 29: Novelist Toni Morrison is presented with a Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Barack Obama during an East Room event May 29, 2012 at the White House in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, is presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to writer Toni Morrison during the prestigious ceremony that is known as the highest civilian honor bestowed by the President. (Photo by Christy Bowe/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 29: Toni Morrison receives a Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in the East Room of the White House on May 29, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Leigh Vogel/WireImage)
Novelist Toni Morrison is presented with a Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, is presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors. (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to writer Toni Morrison during the prestigious ceremony that is known as the highest civilian honor bestowed by the President. (Photo by ImageCatcher News Service/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 29: Toni Morrison receives a Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in the East Room of the White House on May 29, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Leigh Vogel/WireImage)
U.S. President Barack Obama whispers to novelist Toni Morrison as he prepares to award her a 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama with novelist Toni Morrison as he prepares to award her a 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
Novelist Toni Morrison is presented with a Presidential Medal of Freedom at the White House in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, is presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors. (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to writer Toni Morrison during the prestigious ceremony that is known as the highest civilian honor bestowed by the President. (Photo by Christy Bowe/Corbis via Getty Images)
President Barack Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to writer Toni Morrison during the prestigious ceremony that is known as the highest civilian honor bestowed by the President. (Photo by ImageCatcher News Service/Corbis via Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama whispers to novelist Toni Morrison as he prepares to award her a 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama whispers to novelist Toni Morrison as he prepares to award her a 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images)
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Some of Obama's other recommendations include "Wolf Hall" by Hilary Mantel, a fictional story on Thomas Cromwell's rise to power, which came out in 2009. "I was a little busy back then, so I missed it. Still great today," he wrote.

Obama also called "Men Without Women" by Japanese author Haruki Murakami moving. "[It] examines what happens to characters without important women in their lives; it'll move you and confuse you and sometimes leave you with more questions than answers."

He also suggested "How to Read the Air" by Dinaw Mengestu, an author from Ethiopia who tells the story of a recently divorced Ethiopian-American immigrant who leaves Manhattan to learn about his parents' journey to the States. Although it was published in 2010, its theme feels ever-so-relevant today.

"You’ll get a better sense of the complexity and redemption within the American immigrant story," Obama wrote.

You can read Obama's full Facebook post here and shop from his reading list below:

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