Extreme Minimalists: Woman lives in home without any furniture

Youheum Son is truly an extreme minimalist. 

Aside from her cat's bed, a few string lights and flowers, Son's apartment, which she shares with her minimalist sister, fully emulates her dedication to the minimalist lifestyle. And yes, that includes zero furniture. 

"My space is filled with more nourishment and the things that nurture me instead of the furniture that gets in the way of me actually moving freely around my space," she said to AOL Lifestyle. 

Her journey towards a less-is-more lifestyle began after realizing her "shopaholic ways" were toxic. Son began her voyage with reading Marie Kondo's popular book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing ($7.70, Amazon), which taught her about "cultivating happiness as opposed to cultivating more possessions." 

For Son, that even meant using a simple hammock as a bed. 

"I don't believe everyone has to eliminate furniture in their life to find happiness or to cultivate mindfulness," she concluded. "My standard of abundance is being focused on what I really, really want..."

See more of Son's unconventional life in the video above! 

Scroll through below to see more about the minimalist lifestyle: 

28 PHOTOS
Japanese minimalist movement
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Japanese minimalist movement
Utensils lie in a kitchen drawer in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Naoki Numahata talks to his two-and-a-half year old daughter Ei in their living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki stores away her futon mattress in her apartment in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kettle sits on a cooker in the kitchen of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, sits in the family living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kitchen counter is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Books sit on a bookshelf in the home of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
An open kitchen drawer is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toothbrushes are seen in the bathroom of the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A sponge hangs in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toys belonging to two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, are scattered across the floor in her family's living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A razor and toothbrush lie in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The contents of the fridge is seen at the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Katsuya Toyoda demonstrates how he sleeps in his room in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A yoga mat and shorts are seen in the room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Belongings lie in a drawer in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Clothes hang in the wardrobe of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Kitchen utensils hang in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The bathroom cupboard of minimalist Fumio Sasaki is seen in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A tray lies on a table in the living room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A laptop belonging to minimalist Fumio Sasaki sits on his desk in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "MINIMALISM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Minimalist Fumio Sasaki uses a wet wipe to clean the floor in his room in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A living room window is seen in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Soap sits in a dish at the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Glasses and spices sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki demonstrates where she reads in her room in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Clothes hang in a wardrobe in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Glasses and cups sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
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