Where to get free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day 2019

Admittedly, some food holidays are pretty silly. However, anytime *free* food is involved, things get a little more serious. National Doughnut Day is one of those more serious food holidays. As one of the most celebrated food holidays in the U.S., it presents a plethora of sweet freebies, along with a lesson in American history. Here's where to get free doughnuts on National Doughnut Day 2019 and exactly how this holiday got its start. 

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National Doughnut Day 2019 deals
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National Doughnut Day 2019 deals

Krispy Kreme

Customers can get one free doughnut off the menu all day, no purchase necessary, on June 7th.

If the doughnut company gives away one million free doughnuts on Friday, they'll reward fans with a second free doughnut in June. (Fingers crossed!)

Dunkin'

Dunkin' is giving customers a free classic donut with the purchase of any beverage.

The brand wants to encourage people to take a break and spend some time on themselves, or in their words, "Dunk out." 

Walmart

Customers can head to the grocery giant for a free doughnut on Friday. All they need to do is go to the bakery section at any Walmart Supercenter or any participating Neighborhood Market and they'll receive a free glazed doughnut.

Tim Horton's

This National Doughnut Day, the Canadian brand is celebrating with a new doughnut flavor: churro.

The churro doughnut is a honey cruller filled with caramel filling and topped with cinnamon sugar. It will be available at select locations starting June 7 and across the U.S. starting June 12, but only for a limited time.

Cumberland Farms

In the morning between 5 am and 10 am, purchase a dispensed beverage at any new or newly remodeled store locations in the Northeast and Florida and receive a free doughnut. Flavors to choose from include classic glaze, jelly-filled, cookies and cream, cocoa hazelnut-filled and blueberry.

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National Doughnut Day has been celebrated in the U.S. since 1938—that's roughly 80 years! The holiday occurs on the first Friday of every June and surprisingly, its origin goes back to World War I

When the U.S. joined the first World War in 1917, The Salvation Army sent about 250 volunteers to France. To boost morale, they bravely handed out fresh baked goods to soldiers on the front lines from huts built into abandoned buildings. Two volunteers however, Margaret Sheldon and Helen Purviance, came up with the idea to serve doughnuts. The doughnuts were a hit and the all-female volunteer group became known as the "doughgirls" or "doughnut lassies."

Then, in 1938, the Chicago branch of The Salvation Army launched National Doughnut Day as a fundraiser for the organization and in part, to bring awareness to the organization's work in the community—namely the women in the war. When World War II began the following year, the Red Cross continued the doughnut-serving tradition overseas. 

Back then, traditional doughnuts were the standard, but today, the most ordered doughnuts in the U.S. are surprisingly doughnut holes, according to GrubHub. But no matter which type of doughnut you plan to celebrate with this Friday, keep these women in mind and check out the slideshow above for how to get one for free. 

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Doughnuts being served during war
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Doughnuts being served during war
(Original Caption) This American Red Cross girl is doing a land office business with the doughnut stand she set up near the Vatican in Rome. Sightseeing GI's line up by the score for free sinkers and Mayhap, a little chat with the pretty maid who hands them out.
19th March 1945: Mrs Covington Jania and Mrs Graham Parker serving coffee and doughnuts to recently released British prisoners of war, (from left) G Newman, J H Jones, L F Starkey and W Slade in San Francisco. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)
A US Army corporal, former POW in Germany, gulps doughnuts and cokes at Le Havre airfield (France) April 3, 1945. (Photo by Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)
An hostess serves doughnuts to French prisoners of war children at American Red Cross Club at Camp Boston near Reims (France) September 7, 1945. (Photo by Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)
U.S. soldiers just arrived in England, April 4, 1944 stand on platform at station before boarding a train. A coffee and doughnut wagon manned by two Red Cross workers stands at right. (AP Photo)
One of the American Red Cross club mobiles was ready on the airdrome recently when Flying Fortresses and their crews returned from a bombing raid recently and the club mobile with its crew was just about the most popular thing on the airfield for some little time afterwards. The most remarkable feature of these club mobiles is the fact that doughnuts are made and cooked on board, but they also provide all kinds of other food and refreshment for hungry and thirsty soldiers and airmen. The crews of the clubmobiles, which are former British Green Line buses, travel round with them and are provided with living and sleeping accommodation on board. A general view of airmen and ground crew men gathered round the club mobile for their refreshments under the nose of a newly returned Flying Fortress, Feb. 18, 1943. (AP Photo)
The British capital has been invaded by a friendly army of American sailors. Their leave was short, so it meant crowding the minutes to see the sights and sample British amusements. The gobs are gobbling the good old-fashioned American doughnut at the Washington Club, London, August 5, 1942 and the server is Miss Lusa Soul of the American Red Cross in Britain. At right is Fire Controlman 2nd Class Carl Larson of Boston, Mass., one of the sailors acting as shore. (AP Photo)
(Original Caption) Some of the two hundred German children and children of displaced persons who were entertained by American soldiers at a Christmas party in Berlin are shown enjoying coffee and doughnuts, American style, during the stuffing period of the party. The GI's sacrificed a week's candy ration to give it to the youngsters. Photo shows Staff Sergeant Vernon Everett, of Portland, Maine, and Pfc. Robert Davis, of North Troy, Vermont, help feed some of their little guests.
(Original Caption) 1/2/1942-Long Beach, CA-: Left to right: Kay Francis, Mrs. Harry Brand, Myrna Loy and Mrs. Brian Donlevy, are shown above serving free coffee and doughnuts to sailors on watch duty at the Los Angeles Harbor, from canteens financed by the Bundles for Bluejackets Fund Drive.
Doughnuts and doughboys get together at their new luxury Washington Club. They found them just like mother made even though the chef was English. The club has just opened in London for American troops in this country, 6th July 1942. (Photo by Staff/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)
Major-General Eisenhower takes a donut, at the opening of the Washington Club in London, 1942. (Photo by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Actress Mary Pickford serving doughnuts during Hollywood stage door canteen party at Fort MacArthur during WWII. (Photo by John Florea/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)
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