Sir Richard Branson sends message to South Dakotans, asking them to cruise with him

South Dakotans, are you listening? 

On Thursday, Sir Richard Branson took out an entire page in the New York Times to send a message to the residents of the midwestern state. According to the billionaire, residents of 49 US states have already signed up for his latest venture, Virgin Voyages -- but all the cruise is missing is representatives from South Dakota. 

"Oh, a huge thank you to the other 49 states that have -- we can't wait to make waves with you. It's sure to be a cruise experience unlike any holiday you've ever taken," the 68-year-old magnate pens. "But South Dakota, for a state with a place called Rapid City, you're really taking your time. I was beginning to take your absence personally, and then I read an interesting statistic."

Related: Branson and Obama hit the water 

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Barack Obama & Richard Branson kitesurfing
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Barack Obama & Richard Branson kitesurfing
Former U.S. President Barack Obama sits on a boat during a kite surfing outing with British businessman Richard Branson during his holiday on Branson's Moskito island, in the British Virgin Islands, in a picture handed out by Virgin on February 7, 2017. Jack Brockway/Virgin Handout via REUTERS FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Former U.S. President Barack Obama and British businessman Richard Branson sit on a boat during Obama's holiday on Branson's Moskito island, in the British Virgin Islands, in a picture handed out by Virgin on February 7, 2017. Jack Brockway/Virgin Handout via REUTERS FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Former U.S. President Barack Obama tries his hand at kite surfing during a holiday with British businessman Richard Branson on his island Moskito, in the British Virgin Islands, in a picture handed out by Virgin on February 7, 2017. Jack Brockway/Virgin Handout via REUTERS FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
British businessman Richard Branson kite surfs during an outing with former U.S. President Barack Obama during his holiday on Branson's Moskito island, in the British Virgin Islands, in a picture handed out by Virgin on February 7, 2017. Jack Brockway/Virgin Handout via REUTERS FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Former U.S. President Barack Obama tries his hand at kite surfing during a holiday with British businessman Richard Branson on his island Moskito, in the British Virgin Islands, in a picture handed out by Virgin on February 7, 2017. Jack Brockway/Virgin Handout via REUTERS FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY
UNSPCIFIED, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS - FEBRUARY 1: In this undated image Richard Branson takes a break from kitesurfing while vacationing with Former President Barack Obama at Branson's Necker Island retreat on February 1, 2017 in the British Virgin Islands. Former President Obama and his wife Michelle have been on an extended vacation since leaving office on January 20. (Photo by Jack Brockway/Getty Images)
UNSPCIFIED, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS - JANUARY 29:Former President Barack Obama kitesurfs at Richard Branson's Necker Island retreat on January 29, 2017 in the British Virgin Islands. Former President Obama and his wife Michelle have been on an extended vacation since leaving office on January 20. (Photo by Jack Brockway/Getty Images)
UNSPCIFIED, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS - FEBRUARY 1: In this undated image Richard Branson kitesurfs while vacationing with Former President Barack Obama at Branson's Necker Island retreat on February 1, 2017 in the British Virgin Islands. Former President Obama and his wife Michelle have been on an extended vacation since leaving office on January 20. (Photo by Jack Brockway/Getty Images)
UNSPCIFIED, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS - JANUARY 29:Former President Barack Obama kitesurfs at Richard Branson's Necker Island retreat on January 29, 2017 in the British Virgin Islands. Former President Obama and his wife Michelle have been on an extended vacation since leaving office on January 20. (Photo by Jack Brockway/Getty Images)
UNSPCIFIED, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS - FEBRUARY 1: In this undated image former President Barack Obama kitesurfs at Richard Branson's Necker Island retreat on February 1, 2017 in the British Virgin Islands. Former President Obama and his wife Michelle have been on an extended vacation since leaving office on January 20. (Photo by Jack Brockway/Getty Images)
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Branson continues to explain that the average South Dakotan travels less than most other Americans, using just 26 percent, or only 4 days, of their dedicated time off.

As an incentive, Branson and his team are offering the first lucky South Dakotan passenger who books $605 in "Sailor Loot" to use on-board, 2 first class tickets from the 605 to the 305, a one-night hotel stay in Miami and a limo transfer to the ship. The Virgin Group Founder also put up a series of catchy on-brand billboards across the state to encourage bookings. "Sioux, ya gonna book or what?" reads one of the signs. 

Virgin Voyages, which launches in 2020 by Virgin, offers a new kind of onboard experience for its passengers with "no kids, no buffets and no limits." Destinations include Havana, Bimini, Puerto Plata and Costa Maya. Happy sailing! 

Related: Follow these tips for a smooth cruise 

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How to avoid getting seasick while on a cruise
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How to avoid getting seasick while on a cruise

1. Call guest services

A lot of people feel queasy once on board. Consequently, most cruise lines offer anti-nausea pills at their guest service counters at no extra charge. The motion sickness medicine will help until your body becomes accustomed to the movement of the ship. 

2. Choose your cabin wisely.

A cabin with windows and a balcony will allow more air and light into the room, alleviating queasiness. Alternatively, an indoor cabin can exacerbate these symptoms.

The location of the cabin can do wonders as well. According to Cruise Critic, cabin location is "a question of engineering, really." Choose a cabin lower and more central to the rest of the ship -- you won't feel the ship's movement nearly as much. 

"The higher decks and cabins at the very front (forward) or back (aft) of the ship will rock and roll the most," they said

3. You can still manage in an indoor cabin.

While an outdoor/balcony cabin is better for those prone to seasickness, an indoor cabin might be okay. One insider insists the TV should be turned onto the "ship camera" channel. It "will create the illusion of having a window when you have an inside room."

4. Invest in a relief band

It may be expensive, but a relief band could be your cure. Many cruise-goers insist on this small device, which fits on your wrist like a watch. 

This FDA-approved device has been proven to stop motion sickness and nausea -- just remember batteries! 

BUY IT

5. Opt for nausea-reducing foods.

If you call room service and complain of seasickness, more likely than not they'll send you up a bottle of ginger ale, saltines and green apples. 

Vacationers swear by green apples. For many people, the sour taste is the cure for all sorts of motion sickness. 

6. Keep your eye on the horizon 

In doing so, your brain "can use the horizon as a point of reference." It helps in reminding your brain that you are moving, solving the conflict between your ears and your eyes. 

7. Your journey and time of year matters. 

The rockiness of the boat can depend on the season or even the route of the cruise. Sailing across the Atlantic may face rougher waters than cruising in the Caribbean.

If you're going to the Caribbean, it might best to avoid the summer or fall (aka hurricane season). You don't want choppy waters, high wind or rain. 

8. Go with a more modern ship

No, not for safety concerns. Big ships that were built recently were probably built with stabilizers. Also used in ferries, the stabilizers are used to help prevent sea sickness. 

9. Talk to your doctor about anti-nausea medicine. 

Dramamine helps to calm, prevent and treat motion sickness. Bonine is also a popular medication to treat seasickness. 

10. Check your posture

Some doctors believe that posture can influence how your body reacts to movement, like the rocking of a boat. If you're feeling nauseous, try sitting upright or with a pillow to support the neck. 

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