Fisher-Price recalls all Rock 'N Play sleepers after 30 infant deaths

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ordered a recall for all models of Fisher-Price’s Rock ’n Plays after numerous reports of babies dying while inside the sleepers.

The inclined sleeper, which is designed to gently rock babies back and forth, has been involved of the deaths of more than 30 infants since 2009, the commission said Friday. The babies died after they rolled over in the sleeper unrestrained or “under other circumstances,” according to the CPSC.

The commission urged consumers to stop using the sleeper immediately and said they could contact Fisher-Price for a refund or voucher for the product, which cost anywhere from $40 to $149. 

After the CPSC announced the recall, Fisher-Price issued a statement Friday evening saying it was “voluntarily” recalling the sleepers due to the reported deaths.

The Rock ’n Play is designed for newborns and babies who weigh 25 pounds or less. The sleeper includes a seatbelt, and some models have a feature that automatically rocks the cradle at the push of a button.  

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The product recall comes one week after the CPSC issued a joint warning with Fisher-Price telling parents and caregivers to stop using it after their infant reaches 3 months of age or as soon as the baby appears to exhibit “rollover behavior.”

The earlier warning noted that at least 10 babies of at least 3 months old have died in the sleeper since 2015. At that time, Fisher-Price defended its product, saying it met “all applicable safety standards.”

On Tuesday, the American Academy of Pediatrics urged the CPSC to replace the warning with a recall after a new analysis by Consumer Reports linked 32 infant deaths to the sleeper. 

The AAP, a group of 67,000 children’s health providers, took its warning even further, saying it does not recommend leaving sleeping babies in any product that requires restraints, including car seats and strollers. 

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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