Emirates' flight attendant program is so exclusive, they even have rules on what shade of lipstick can be worn

There's no doubt that Emirates is one of the most exclusive airlines in the world. 

The Dubai-based airline was established back in 1985, and since then has climbed through the ranks to become one of the best airlines in the world for both first class and economy travel. Everything from the luxurious first-class amenities (shower spa, moisturizing loungewear, on-board lounge) to its impressive in-air fine wine cellar (in which they've invested $700M in a wine program since 2006, including 80 champagnes and wines offered daily) plays a role in their international reputation. 

Inside the airlines' beauty and uniform guidelines: 

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The beauty and uniform rules Emirates' flight attendants must follow
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The beauty and uniform rules Emirates' flight attendants must follow

Emirates flight attendants go through a rigorous training process that includes everything from defense training, mixology lessons and medical training. 

It's not just that the crew members have to learn how to give CPR and assist in emergency situations. They have to look the part, complete with red high heels and a particular shade of lipstick.

"We represent Arabia, and so [we] have designed our uniform and beauty standards to be a blend of modern and traditional, as well as respectful to the area where we live, with the tan color representing the desert sand and warmth of the gulf region," explained an airline representative to AOL Lifestyle.

Since 2009, the Emirates team has been wearing the same uniform of a cream skirt with red outlinings.

The Emirates uniforms were drawn up to help give the airline a more business-oriented image. The airline tested various uniforms in airports by evaluating how different travelers reacted. 

Their uniform is representative of the airline's history and base in Dubai and contributes to the airline's image. 

"Intrinsic to the Emirates look and feel is the iconic hat which incorporates an attractive white silk scarf wrapped around the red hat and curves round the wearer’s neck giving tribute to the traditions of the Middle East," explained the airline to AOL Lifestyle.

"Not only does it remind people that the global airline is based in the Middle East, but it complements the uniform. This has been integral part of the Emirates uniform worn by crew members since the launch of the airline in 1985. This is an item of uniform that will always stay with Emirates, as it is very much a part of the Emirates brand and is recognized around the globe."

Their uniforms, down to the exact color of their hair scrunchie, are outlined by the airline's rulebook.

Part of being an Emirates' flight attendant is not just behaving the part, but looking the part too. Emirates' flight attendants must dress in the airlines' uniform, consisting of a cream skirt and blouse, along with a matching jacket and scarf (to mimic the airline's base in the United Arab Emirates.

Flight attendants also must wear a red hat, too, while in the airport and boarding and deboarding the plane. 

Their uniforms were made to survive long-haul flights.

Everything down to the very material of the uniforms is to promise that the airline's representatives look presentable. The uniforms for both the male and female flight attendants are made with 4 percent Lycra to ensure no wrinkles, while maximizing comfortability and flexibility.

Uniform accessories are made from leather. 

They're even particular about their beauty standards, too. 

Applicants with visible tattoos don't meet Emirates requirements' -- and cosmetic bandages aren't allowed. Necklaces and bracelets aren't allowed to be worn, while cabin crew members can *only* wear pearls, gold, diamond or crystal studs if they choose to wear earrings.  

Even their nails must be up to Emirates standards. 

Nude, light pinks and French manicures are permitted, and certain red nail polish is allowed. The team has an "Imaging and Grooming Department" where all these rules are outlined. 

There is even a shade of lipstick called "Emirates red." 

Because Emirates is so intent on uniformity, cabin crew members are required to wear red lipstick to stay on brand. Many of these workers opt for MAC's long-lasting "Russian Red," outlined by red lipliner. Liquid eyeliner is strongly encouraged, and can be applied with black or beige eyeshadow. These requirements are learned during flight attendant training, where trainees can learn about the airline's beauty standards. 

Their hair is always up. 

For the airline workers, longer hair should be kept in a French twist or bun, secured with a red scrunchie. Men must be well-groomed. A mustache is allowed, but not a beard.

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With over 156 destinations across 86 different countries, Emirates has sustained its rank as one of the best in the world. 

But there's something else that contributes to Emirates' stature -- and it has to do with their flight attendant program, which is known to be one of the most elite globally.

SEE MORE: 12 epic international winter trips you can take right now on Emirates

"Year on year we receive thousands of applications to become Emirates cabin crew," explained an airline representative to AOL Lifestyle. "Our selection process is very stringent, and only a small percentage of our applicants make it through the recruitment phase."

RELATED: Take a peek inside Emirates' suites

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Amazing perks of Emirates airline
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Amazing perks of Emirates airline
SCHOENEFELD, GERMANY - JUNE 01: The washroomn and mirror in the first class section are pictured on board an Emirates A380 passenger plane at the ILA 2016 Berlin Air Show on June 1, 2016 in Schoenefeld, Germany. The ILA 2016 will be open to visitors from June 1-4. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
SCHOENEFELD, GERMANY - JUNE 01: The washroom in the first class section is pictured on board an Emirates A380 passenger plane at the ILA 2016 Berlin Air Show on June 1, 2016 in Schoenefeld, Germany. The ILA 2016 will be open to visitors from June 1-4. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Food and a selection of beverages are laid out on the new bar area for the Airbus A380 aircraft during the unveiling at the ITB Travel Fair in Berlin, Germany, on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. Flying bars that cater to premium passengers on the worlds biggest fleet of A380 superjumbos are set for a saloon-style upgrade as Gulf carrier Emirates seeks to use the sky-high hangouts to lure affluent travelers. Photographer: Rolf Schulten/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The new bar area for the Emirates Airlines A380 aircraft sits on display as it is unveiled to the trade and media during the ITB Travel Fair in Berlin, Germany, on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. Flying bars that cater to premium passengers on the worlds biggest fleet of A380 superjumbos are set for a saloon-style upgrade as Gulf carrier Emirates seeks to use the sky-high hangouts to lure affluent travelers. Photographer: Rolf Schulten/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The new bar area for the Emirates Airlines A380 aircraft sits on display as it is unveiled to the trade and media during the ITB Travel Fair in Berlin, Germany, on Wednesday, March 8, 2017. Flying bars that cater to premium passengers on the worlds biggest fleet of A380 superjumbos are set for a saloon-style upgrade as Gulf carrier Emirates seeks to use the sky-high hangouts to lure affluent travelers. Photographer: Rolf Schulten/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A first class 'mini-cabin' seat aboard an Emirates Airlines A380 on August 1, 2008. Emirates becomes the first commercial Airbus A380 jet to land in the United States at JFK International Airport in New York. The A380 is the world's largest airliner with 49 percent more floor space and 35 percent more seating than the previous largest aircraft. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on May 4, 2014 in Abu Dhabi shows the interior of the first class suites of the new A380 aircraft of the United Arab Emirates airline carrier Etihad Airlines. Etihad Airways will be targeting premium high-yielding passengers as the company announced that its Airbus A380 will offer hotel-style bedrooms. AFP PHOTO /KARIM SAHIB (Photo credit should read KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on May 4, 2014 in Abu Dhabi shows the interior of the first class suites of the new A380 aircraft of the United Arab Emirates airline carrier Etihad Airlines. Etihad Airways will be targeting premium high-yielding passengers as the company announced that its Airbus A380 will offer hotel-style bedrooms. AFP PHOTO /KARIM SAHIB (Photo credit should read KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)
Scenes from inside the Emirates Dubai First and Business class lounges on September 3, 2013 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Scenes from inside the Emirates Dubai First and Business class lounges on September 3, 2013 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
A flight attendant stands next to first class seats aboard an Emirates Airlines A380 on August 1, 2008. Emirates becomes the first commercial Airbus A380 jet to land in the United States at JFK International Airport in New York. The A380 is the world's largest airliner with 49 percent more floor space and 35 percent more seating than the previous largest aircraft. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
The first class bathroom with a shower aboard an Emirates Airlines A380 on August 1, 2008. Emirates becomes the first commercial Airbus A380 jet to land in the United States at JFK International Airport in New York. The A380 is the world's largest airliner with 49 percent more floor space and 35 percent more seating than the previous largest aircraft. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
BERLIN - JUNE 09: Visitors walk by a stewardess at the bar in the first class section of an Emirates Airbus A380 at the ILA Berlin Air Show on June 9, 2010 in Berlin, Germany. Emirates announced the day before that it will increase its order for the A380 to a total of 90 aircraft. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Two first class suites are pictured inside an Airbus A380 of United Arab Emirates air carrier Emirates after the first landing of the plane in Frankfurt's airport, September 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS TRAVEL)
Economy class seats are pictured inside an Emirates Airbus A380 after the first landing of the plane in Frankfurt's airport, September 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS TRAVEL)
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If you've ever flown the airline, then you know just how hospitable and well trained the Emirates' flight attendants are. Their flight attendant program is something that the airline prides itself on. It consists of an intense training process that coaches its students through everything from emergency protocol to a mixology class. 

But perhaps the strictest (and most unexpected!) training process of them all? Their beauty rules, which outline everything from which shade of lipstick they can wear to the types of earrings allowed and how they can wear their hair. All of these regulations are learned at Emirates Aviation College during training. 

Even something as stringent as the color of their hair scrunchie helps add to the exclusivity of the airline and how Emirates operates as a whole.

SEE MORE: Why you should visit Athens in the winter 

"We represent Arabia, and so [we] have designed our uniform and beauty standards to be a blend of modern and traditional," continued the representative, "as well as respectful to the area where we live, with the tan color representing the desert sand and warmth of the gulf region."

Read more about these standards in the gallery above. 

RELATED: Food you should never, ever buy at the airport

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Foods you should never buy at the airport
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Foods you should never buy at the airport

Soft pretzels

“A big old soft pretzel is not a meal,” says registered dietitian Marjorie Nolan Cohn, owner of MNC Nutrition in Philadelphia. Those fluffy carbs might smell enticing, but carbo-loading before a long flight will leave your tummy rumbling again by takeoff. Look for something with protein and fiber that will keep you satisfied until you land, or better yet, pack a meal from home. Nolan Cohn recommends making a sandwich at home to save money or packing leftovers like pasta salad or grilled chicken in an old, washed plastic container, such as a cottage cheese tub.

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Guilty pleasures

Try not to lump your waiting time at the airport in with the “treat mentality” of the rest of your vacation, says registered dietitian nutritionist Libby Mills, founder of Dig In Eat Up. “Even though it might be the kickoff to vacation, you want to save those calories for something unique when you arrive,” she says. Skip the specialty coffee drink and stick with plain coffee if you need a caffeine fix, or leave room for ice cream at the beach instead of gobbling a bag of cookies at the airport. Don’t miss these other 15 secrets to staying healthy on vacation.

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Parfaits

You’ve seen yogurt touted time and time again as one of the healthiest snacks you can get, thanks to its satiating protein. But that fruit and yogurt parfait isn’t the healthy and fresh choice that it seems. “Yogurt has its halo over it as a healthy food, and obviously it is, but in context of what additives are in it,” says Nolan Cohn. By the time you turn plain yogurt into a sugary flavored yogurt topped with granola and fruit (which, unlike fresh berries, is full of added sugar), it isn’t a healthy choice anymore, she says. Skip the parfait and choose a regular yogurt from the fridge, or try these 19 nutritionist-approved travel snacks you can buy anywhere.

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Sugary yogurts

Even yogurts that aren’t covered in granola or chocolate chips can be a stealthy sugar bomb. Fruit-on-the-bottom varieties are “not really fruit—it’s more like jelly,” says Nolan Cohn, and the dessert-like flavors and toppings can have almost as much sugar as the treats they’re named after. A cup of unflavored Greek yogurt is a safe bet, but if you need something less tart, vanilla varieties tend to have a bit less sugar than the fruity ones, she says. Try these other 13 healthy tricks for actually losing weight on vacation.

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Granola bars

Granola bars are often designed to look like a smart choice, but there’s more than meets the eye. “Some are like candy bars in a really strategic marketing package to make it look like something way healthier than it is,” says Nolan Cohn. Granola bars can be packed with added sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and other decidedly unhealthy ingredients, especially if they’re covered in a waxy (and melty) coating. That said, a shelf-stable, portable snack is convenient when you need to take the hunger off during your travels, so hunt down an option with 12 or fewer grams of sugar, she says. Check out these other 10 ways to eat healthy on vacation.

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Coffee

A cheap, low-calorie cup of coffee might seem like the perfect treat while you’re waiting, but you might regret it once you’re seated. “Coffee has caffeine and can agitate the nerves, which might not make for the most relaxing flight,” says Mills. Plus, if coffee goes through you fast, you could end up making multiple bathroom dashes, she points out. Try a calming herbal tea instead, Mills suggests.

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Large bar tab

While a glass of wine as you wait for your flight won’t do much harm for most people, you’ll want to keep your drinking to a minimum. Not only could it dehydrate you before an already dehydrating plane ride, but alcohol isn’t good for deep sleep. You might crash quick, but the alcohol will wake you up and keep you out of deep REM sleep as your liver works it out. “A less restful trip, especially if you’re going overseas, may be counterproductive to enjoying yourself fully when you arrive,” says Mills.

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Double-decker sandwiches

You might not have too many choices at a quick-grab sandwich station, but keep your calories in check by avoiding excessive fillings, says Mills. “If it has triple layers of meat or bread, that’s a tipoff that you’re getting triple servings,” she says. “‘Crispy,’ breaded,’ and ‘fried’ … are words on a menu that are tipoffs of an extra serving of carbohydrates, plus the extra fat.” 

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Water bottles

You might not want to rely on the bottled water from the airport terminal—and not just because of its sky-high prices. Normally we’d never discourage some good-for-you hydration, but hear us out if you have a small bladder. “You’re guzzling water before getting on the plane, then sharing a toilet with how many people?” says Nolan Cohn. Because hydration is important, especially when you’re stuck in a dry plane cabin, she recommends sipping extra water the night and morning before your flight so you aren’t dehydrated when you board. Especially if your flight is more than a couple hours, though, don’t ignore your thirst in the name of avoiding the bathroom, she says.

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Anything your stomach isn't used to

When you’re about to sit in close quarters for hours on end, you’ll want to avoid foods that don’t tend to sit well with your digestive system. Steer clear of foods that normally might upset your stomach, such as certain types of fiber or greasy foods. “A hamburger and French fries or fried chicken before you get on a plane might not be the best idea,” says Nolan Cohn. “They have a higher potential for triggering diarrhea or GI issues.”

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