7 foods to avoid during the government shutdown

Food safety inspections by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have been halted since the government shutdown began on Dec. 22, but inspectors returned to work on Tuesday to allow the agency to resume inspections of certain high-risk foods.

While they’re still not being paid — and are operating at a shorter capacity than usual — 150 FDA staffers are being used to do food inspections of certain foods, FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb wrote on Twitter Tuesday. Those foods include soft cheeses, seafood, custard-filled bakery products, some fruits and vegetables, and baby formula.

Still, food safety experts aren’t exactly thrilled. “Consumers still need to note a few considerations when it comes to food safety, as the number of inspections and resources had greatly decreased,” Darin Detwiler, PhD, director of the Regulatory Affairs of Food and Food Industries program at Northeastern University, tells Yahoo Lifestyle.

The FDA isn’t the only organization that inspects food, Detwiler points out: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service “plays a lead role in regulating meat, poultry, and egg products (dried, liquid, or frozen eggs; shell eggs fall under the FDA’s jurisdiction),” he says. And, according to the USDA’s FY 2019 contingency plan, about 11 percent of the staff that does these inspections are on furlough.

Food poisoning is serious: Each year, 48 million people get sick from food-borne illness, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s why Detwiler recommends people do their best to avoid these foods that tend to be hotbeds for food-borne illness:

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Foods to avoid during the government shutdown
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Foods to avoid during the government shutdown

Unpasteurized juices, ciders, or dairy products

Raw or undercooked meat and poultry, eggs, and shellfish

Store-bought salads (including ham, egg, tuna, chicken, potato, and macaroni)

Refrigerated, ready-to-eat foods (including hot dogs and deli meats)

Raw sprouts

Cantaloupe

Any other uncooked and unwashed fruits and vegetables in general
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“When you look at many of the recent outbreaks and recalls and take into consideration trends in terms of past foods behind illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths, these foods rise to the top,” Detwiler says. “Without the federal oversight, we are at increased risk, given the rapid movement of perishable foods to market.”

Here’s the thing: This can get really complicated from a regulatory oversight standpoint, Benjamin Chapman, PhD, an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University, tells Yahoo Lifestyle. Some foods may be inspected on a state level, while others may be inspected on a federal level, and it’s not the same across the board. Others, like unpasteurized juices, aren’t typically under FDA jurisdiction but may be if they’re packaged and cross state lines. “It’s not easy as a consumer to determine if the food is state or federally inspected food,” Chapman says.

“Some routine inspections may only be done annually or once every two years — the FDA doesn’t share a lot of that information,” he says. Just keep in mind that “the vast majority of food that we have on shelves is still being inspected by somebody,” Chapman says. “Having FDA routine inspection not be there is certainly not ideal and any time you can have more eyes on a facility, that’s only going to make food safer. But the food industry has the biggest responsibility for safety. They have internal audits and inspections. All of those create multiple snapshots of what’s happening.”

RELATED: Food poisoning risks 

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Common Food Poisoning Risks and How To Avoid Them This Summer
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Common Food Poisoning Risks and How To Avoid Them This Summer

Every year 48 million Americans, or roughly one in six people, get sick from foodborne illnesses, and about 3,000 cases each year are deadly. Find out which common foods carry the highest risk of food poisoning.

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Chicken

Between 1998 and 2010 in the United States, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) reports that chicken accounted for 452 outbreaks that sickened 6,896 consumers, more than to any other meat or poultry product. Most outbreaks are caused by bacteria Clostridium perfringens, found in poorly prepared food or food left to stand too long, and bacteria Salmonella, which often contaminates poultry during slaughter and processing.

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Leafy Greens

In an analysis of a decade of foodborne outbreak data in the U.S., a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study found that leafy vegetables account for the most illnesses, surprisingly outnumbering animal food categories like beef and poultry. The pathogen Norovirus, which can contaminate food when it is handled by a sick person, causes 46% of those illnesses.

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Ground Beef

Ground beef carries a very high risk of foodborne illness because contamination with antibiotic-susceptible and resistant strains of E. coli and Salmonella can occur, leading to hospitalization, severe symptoms with long-term health effects or death.

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Eggs

Most illnesses from egg consumption are due to Salmonella, sickening more than 11,000 people from 1990 to 2006. Federal regulations in the 1970s have reduced transmission of Salmonella from external fecal contamination of the shells, but today's most common type, Salmonella enteritidis, infects the ovaries of healthy hens and is transmitted to the egg even before the shell is formed. Eating your eggs raw or runny can increase your risk of illness.

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Tuna

Scombroid is the leading cause of illness for tuna dishes and occurs when improperly stored fresh fish start to decay and release natural toxins. The SCPI's Outbreak Alert! database shows that over 2,300 people have reported cases of scombroid poisoning, which can cause symptoms like abdominal cramps, nausea and diarrhea.

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Oysters

Most cases of illness with oysters occurred in restaurants and are attributed to Norovirus and bacteria Vibrio. While other foods can become contaminated with Norovirus from improper handling, oysters can pick up the bacteria from the waters they are harvested from, making them risky to serve raw or undercooked.

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Pork

The CSPI reports that pork (other than ham, sausage and barbecue) sickened more than 2,000 people from 1998 to 2010, and most pork illnesses were linked to Salmonella. Interestingly, more outbreaks occured at consumers' homes than in restaurants (40% compared to 24% of outbreaks).

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Turkey

From 1998 to 2010, there have been 130 turkey-related foodborne outbreaks that have caused 4,349 documented illnesses (second only to chicken among meat or poultry products) most commonly attributed to Clostridium perfringens. The CSPI explains that the spike of outbreaks in the months of November and December are due to improper handling of turkey holiday meals that are left out at room temperature for too long.

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Potatoes

Outbreaks with potato occur in potato salads and other potato dishes, and more than 30% of potato-related outbreaks are linked to Salmonella. Since these dishes contain many ingredients, the causes of contamination can occur from any of the raw ingredients or from improper handling of a raw meat or poultry ingredient.

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Other Beef Products (Not Steak, Ground or Roast)

Other beef products, such as beef jerky, beef stroganoff and chipped beef, are responsible for 99 outbreaks and at least 2,414 illnesses from 1998 to 2010 according to the CSPI. Improper handling after cooking may explain most cases of illness.

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Barbecue Beef or Pork

The barbecue cooking method is unique in that it cooks with low, indirect heat and requires after-cooking handling. The CSPI's study of meat-related foodborne illness deems it "medium risk" for causing nearly 2,500 people to get sick from 1998 to 2010, often from pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium perfringens that may be signs of improper handling. In addition, nearly 40% of these outbreaks occurred in a restaurant.

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Roast Beef

Traditional roast beef, brisket or pot roast involve oven-roasting thick cuts of meat in a shallow pan, boiling on a stovetop or cooking on a closed grill. According to CSPI, 2,470 people got sick from eating roast beef from 1998 to 2010, and more than half were sickened by Clostridiium perfringens, a sign that the meat stood at room temperature for too long before being served.

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Cheese

Cheese can become contaminated with pathogens during production, and most cases of illness were due to Salmonella. Nowadays, cheese is made with pasteurized milk which lowers the risk of illness; however, unlicensed manufacturers may still use unpasteurized milk, so consumers should be wary, especially for Latin American-style cheeses like queso fresco and queso oaxaca.

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Steak

The popular cooking method for steaks is searing, when the meat's surface is cooked at high heat over a short period of time. Only the pathogens on the surface are killed, which might explain the 82 foodborne outbreaks that have caused nearly 2,000 illnesses form 1998 to 2010. Over half of these illnesses were linked to E. coli infections that carry serious health risks and even death.

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Ice Cream

The largest ice cream-related outbreak occurred in 1994, when an ice cream manufacturer used the same truck to haul unpasteurized liquid eggs and pasteurized ice cream premix. The Salmonella-contamined premix was used in ice cream products that sickened thousands of people across 41 states. Another major source of food poisoning is homemade ice cream due to the use of undercooked eggs.

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How can you practice safe food handling this summer? Read on to discover three expert tips to stay safe at your next cookout or picnic.

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Wash Hands and Surfaces

Even when you're dining outdoors, make sure to wash hands and surfaces food may come in contact with. The public health organization STOP Foodborne Illness recommends washing hands with warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds and cleaning surfaces with hot soapy water or diluted bleach.

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Cook Meat to the Recommended Temperature

Use a meat thermometer to make sure you reach temperature guidelines when cooking meat. Hamburger patties should be cooked to 160 ºF, and large cuts of beef can be cooked to an internal temperature of 145 ºF for medium rare or 160 ºF for medium.

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Pack Your Cooler to the Max

A full cooler will stay cold longer than a partially filled cooler, and it's important to keep food chilled to slow down bacteria growth.

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Detwiler stresses that the risks in these foods are always present, even with normal regulatory oversight. “This does not mean that we need to be afraid of foods, but it does deserve note that we can be more vigilant and make decisions that decrease the chance of becoming harmed by contaminated foods,” he says. People who are immunocompromised, pregnant, and young children should be especially careful, he adds.

Given that many foods come with some form of risk, there’s only so much you can do. “We cannot live in a plastic bubble and be afraid of everything we eat,” Detwiler says. Still, he adds, “we need to be proactive in our ability to make decisions to best protect ourselves and our family.”

Ultimately, you shouldn’t panic. “Many oversights are still there,” Chapman says. “We really don’t know what the impact is on removing these, but we do know is that more eyes are better than less.”

RELATED: Government shutdown

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A visitor looks though a closed entrance door to Federal Hall, due to the partial government shutdown, across from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. U.S. stocks climbed following last week's rally with investors piling into small-capitalization stocks amid the resumption of trade talks with China. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: Tourists walk past a sign announces that the National Gallery of Art is closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: A sign explaining that areas near the National Gallery of Art are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government is seen, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: A sign announces that the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and ice rink are closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: Restrooms at East Potomac Park are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: The road that leads to Hains Point at East Potomac Park is closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump speaks as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand on duty at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay began on Deember 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on Thursday, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Coast Guard vessel patrols New York Harbor waters off Battery Park on January 5, 2019, in New York, as the US government shutdown enters its third week. - While most of the US military is unaffected, about 42,000 Coast Guard members are working without pay. That branch falls under the Department of Homeland Security, not the Pentagon. (Photo by DON EMMERT / AFP) (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen prepare to clean a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) speaks as he joined by Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (L) in the Rose Garden of the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump hosted both Democratic and Republican lawmakers at the White House for the second meeting in three days as the government shutdown heads into its third week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump is joined by Vice President Mike Pence while speaking to the media after a meeting with Congressional leaders about ending the partial government shutdown, in the Rose Garden at the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. The U.S government is going into the 13th day of a partial shutdown with Republicans and Democrats at odds on agreeing with President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump addresses a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House following a meeting with Congressional leaders on the government shutdown, January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. - Trump said he was prepared to keep the US government closed for a year or more, as he stood firm on his contentious demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: A sign placed by staff is posted on a temporary barricade at a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A crew from junk removal company 1-800-Got-Junk clears garbage which has been uncollected due to the federal government shutdown, from the Ellipse, a public area south of the White House, January 4, 2019. The shutdown is in its 14th day as newly appointed Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other Congressional leaders will be meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A sign and a padlock on the door of the Ellipse VIsitor Center south of the White House explain that the facility and the National Christmas Tree site is closed due to the federal government shutdown, in its' 14th day, January 4, 2019. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
MAMMOTH, WY - JANUARY 3: Visitors board a snow coach for the Old Faithful Snowlodge on January 3, 2019 in Mammoth, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Xanterra, a private concessionaire in Yellowstone, is paying for grooming of the roads to their lodge at Old Faithful. Xanterra is also helping stock and clean park restrooms during the shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: A family visits the Terraces Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Visitors are still allowed access to the parks attractions but services are limited. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The parking lot and changing area at Boiling River is closed on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. While visitors can still access the river, non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The Visitor Center, typically crowded with guests and tourists, is closed on January 3, 2019 Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
Signs placed by staff at a closed campground in the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A closed and blocked campground (L) at the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Tourists drive past the closed entrance ticket station of the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California, on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pedestrians walk beyond a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown next to a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A cyclist takes a photograph while sitting next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A man uses a smartphone to take a selfie photograph while standing next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, 2019 -- People stand in front of the closed doors of the Smithsonian Institution Building's visitor center in Washington D.C., the United States, on Jan. 2, 2019. The 19 Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo in Washington D.C. closed their doors on Wednesday as the partial U.S. government shutdown dragged on.?(Xinhua/Liu Jie) (Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images)
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Garbage sits in a parking lot at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Visitors walk past full garbage cans at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JANUARY 02: A sign informs visitors of the closing of Federal Hall as the partial government shutdown continues on January 02, 2019 in New York City. As President Donald Trump continues to insist on money to build a wall along the Southern border of the United States, the partial government shutdown and the standoff with Democrats continues. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background, as trash lays uncollected on the National Mall due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background as people bike past trash uncollected on the National Mall, due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A young girl reads a sign posted on the door of The National Museum of African American History stating that all Smithsonian Museums are closed due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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