This is the most commonly misspelled word on job resumes

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression with hiring managers. One misspelled word might not seem like a huge deal, but it can mean the difference between looking competent and appearing lazy. A 2014 Accountemps survey of 300 senior managers found that 63 percent of employers would reject a job candidate who had just one or two typos on their resume. Here are nine more resume mistakes that could cost you the job.

Most misspellings on resumes slip through the cracks because spell check doesn’t catch them. The most common misspelling on resumes is a shockingly simple word—or so you’d think.

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Career coach and resume writer Jared Redick of Resume Studio in San Francisco tells Business Insider that the most common misspelling he sees by far is confusing “lead” with “led.” If you’re talking about how you run meetings at your current job, the correct spelling is “lead,” which is in the present tense. If the bullet point is from a former position, use “lead”’s past tense: “led.” Yes, “lead” as in the metal can also be pronounced “led,” but most people have no need to discuss chemical elements on their job resumes. And since “lead” and “led” are both real words, your spell checker won’t flag this error. Don’t miss these other nine spelling and grammar mistakes spell check won’t catch.

Other spelling mistakes Redick has seen pop up over and over again on resumes is spelling “definitely” as “definately” (which spell check thankfully should catch) and adding an e in “judgment” (“judgement” is the British spelling, but “judgment” is preferred in American English).

To avoid the cringe factor of noticing little typos after sending out your application—especially if your misspelling actually is a real word that spell check recognizes—always proofread your resume before submitting. Slowly reading it out loud will take just a few minutes, but it could mean the difference between an interview and a rejection. Read on to find out the 16 words and phrases you should never put on your resume, period.

Originally Published on Readers Digest

See how one man took his resume to the next level:

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