Mammoths mingle with tigers and elephants in Paris light show

PARIS, Dec 20 (Reuters) - Extinct dinosaurs and mammoths light up a Paris botanical garden next to a rhinoceros, tigers and panda-shaped lanterns at a show that aims to draw attention to the world's endangered species.

Every year, Paris celebrates Christmas with a light show featuring installations across the city. This year, the Jardin des Plantes is hosting animal-shaped figures standing up to 50 feet tall, made of textile-covered wire frames lit from within.

The tour starts with prehistoric dinosaurs, then shows the first species that became extinct due to the pressure of human civilization. It concludes with today's endangered species, also including elephants and a 30-meter-long white shark.

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Light show draws attention to the world's endangered species
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Light show draws attention to the world's endangered species
A couple visit the "Shining a light on species" exhibition in the Jardin de plantes garden in Paris, France, December 18, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
People visit the "Shining a light on species" exhibition in the Jardin de plantes garden in Paris, France, December 18, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
People visit the "Shining a light on species" exhibition in the Jardin de plantes garden in Paris, France, December 18, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
People visit the "Shining a light on species" exhibition in the Jardin de plantes garden in Paris, France, December 18, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
People visit the "Shining a light on species" exhibition in the Jardin de plantes garden in Paris, France, December 18, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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"The essential message is to invite people to walk in a magical place," French National History museum president Bruno David told Reuters. ."..If on top of that we can raise awareness of nature's diversity, then we have really done our job."

The World Wildlife Fund estimates that populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians have, on average, declined by 60 percent over the past 40 years. It says the biggest drivers of biodiversity loss are overexploitation and agriculture, linked with increasing human consumption.

The light show runs until Jan. 15.

(Reporting by Claudia Wyatt; editing by John Stonestreet)

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