A White House painting shows Trump sipping on Diet Coke with Abraham Lincoln and Richard Nixon -- here's what we know about his soda habit

A White House painting shows Trump sipping on Diet Coke with Abraham Lincoln and Richard Nixon -- here's what we know about his soda habit

President Trump's love for soda is real.

So real, in fact, that in a new White House painting, Trump is joined by past Republican presidents such as Richard Nixon and Abraham Lincoln for drinks. While the other presidents are sipping on various types of alcohol, the current POTUS is seen with a glass of Diet Coke.

Painted by artist Andy Thomas, "The Republican Club" was briefly included in Sunday's "60 Minutes" interview with the president -- and it's since gone viral.

It shows past presidents in their element. Nixon can be seen sipping on red wine (he loved a glass of Chateau Lafite Rothschild) while an Orange Blossom Special sits on the table in front of Reagan. Eisenhower, who sits next to Trump in the painting, is nursing scotch as Teddy Roosevelt holds a mint julep.

Thomas' depictions of the past leaders are historically accurate. Especially Trump, who doesn't drink alcohol, is known to join in on a toast with a wine glass full of the carbonated beverage.

Details on Trump's affinity for soda are particularly alarming. According to a controversial report by the New York Times, POTUS is believed to consume up to 12 diet cokes every day, in addition to his various diet staples, which consist of fast food and Oreos.

RELATED: Trump's love story in photos

Studies on the health impacts of diet soda are quite concerning, often addressing the increased risks of stroke, dementia, cardiac issues and diabetes. "The majority of evidence suggests that most sedentary people have a much greater risk of dying early," explained nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert to The Independent. Another side effect of the drink? Weight gain.

Reports reveal that Melania has been requesting that White House chefs create healthier meals for her husband -- but Thomas' painting depicts a more "svelte" Trump, which Twitter users were quick to call out.

RELATED: See Trump over the years