Christine Blasey Ford is being shamed for having vocal fry — here's what that is

As Christine Blasey Ford choked up during her emotional testimony against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday, admitting that she was “terrified” to publicly defend her sexual assault allegations, people on social media taunted her “vocal fry.”

“I am here today not because I want to be; I am terrified,” Ford said at the hearing, according to CNN. “I am here because I believe it is my civic duty to tell you what happened to me while Brett Kavanaugh and I were in high school.” Ford then described the night in 1982 in Bethesda, Md., when she said Kavanaugh tried to rip off her clothing and pinned her down with his hand over her mouth as his friend, Mark Judge, watched.

RELATED: Inside the hearing 

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U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Family members of of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, including his wife Ashley (R) and mother Martha (L), listen to him testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Win McNamee/Pool via REUTERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett Kavanaugh�angrily, tearfully and 'unequivocally' denied sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford, after she told senators at a dramatic hearing that shes 'one hundred percent' certain he is the one who attacked her when they were teenagers. Photographer: Tom Williams/Pool via Bloomberg
White House Counsel and Assistant to the President for U.S. President Donald Trump, Donald McGahn, as Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. SAUL LOEB/Pool via REUTERS
Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh testifies in front of the Senate Judiciary committee regarding sexual assault allegations at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, in Washington, DC, U.S. September 27, 2018. Gabriella Demczuk/Pool via Reuters
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking members Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (R) and Chairman Charles Grassley (R-IA) question Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Win McNamee/Pool via REUTERS
Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via REUTERS
Senator Patrick Leahy, a Democrat from Vermont, left, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett Kavanaugh�angrily, tearfully and 'unequivocally' denied sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford, after she told senators at a dramatic hearing that shes 'one hundred percent' certain he is the one who attacked her when they were teenagers. Photographer: Win McNamee/Pool via Bloomberg
Supreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh arrives with his wife Ashley to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via REUTERS
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) presides over a hearing as Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, U.S., September 27, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via REUTERS
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-SC, leaves for a break from the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Palo Alto University professor Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of a sexual assault in 1982, in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
U.S. Senator Ben Sasse (R-NB) speaks during U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's testimony before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Judge Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in before testifying before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 27, 2018. Tom Williams/Pool via REUTERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, smiles during Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, on September 27, 2018. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh's nomination she was '100 percent' certain he was the assailant and it was 'absolutely not' a case of mistaken identify. (Photo by Andrew Harnik / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW HARNIK/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C. - SEPTEMBER 27: U.S. Senator Thom Tillis (R-NC) displays a judiciary committee document while questioning Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Jim Bourg-Pool/Getty Images)
Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT) questions U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as he testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., on September 27, 2018. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh's nomination she was '100 percent' certain he was the assailant and it was 'absolutely not' a case of mistaken identify. (Photo by Andrew Harnik / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW HARNIK/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Senate Judiciary Committee members (L-R) Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Chairman Charles Grassley (R-IA) talk at the conclusion of the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Brett Kavanaugh in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C. - SEPTEMBER 27: Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Jim Bourg-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was called back to testify about claims by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland. (Photo by Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images)
Ashley Estes Kavanaugh, wife of Supreme Court nominee�Brett Kavanaugh, listens during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Kavanaugh�angrily, tearfully and 'unequivocally' denied sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford, after she told senators at a dramatic hearing that she's 'one hundred percent' certain he is the one who attacked her when they were teenagers. Photographer: Jim Bourg/Pool via Bloomberg
Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett Kavanaugh�angrily, tearfully and 'unequivocally' denied sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford, after she told senators at a dramatic hearing that shes 'one hundred percent' certain he is the one who attacked her when they were teenagers. Photographer: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) listens to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., on September 27, 2018. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh's nomination she was '100 percent' certain he was the assailant and it was 'absolutely not' a case of mistaken identify. (Photo by JIM BOURG / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM BOURG/AFP/Getty Images)
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“Indelible in the hippocampus is the laughter, the uproarious laughter between the two, and their having fun at my expense,” Ford said when Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., asked about her strongest memory of that night, the one she “cannot forget.” 

Some people on social media were turned off by the sound of Ford’s voice, calling her a “Valley Girl,” and slamming her “vocal fry,” a low-pitched, creaky-like sound caused by the movement of vocal cords during speech. Ford’s voice was called “manipulative,” a distraction, and an indication that she was lying under oath by some commenters.

“Vocal fry can be the result of a pathology due to injury or a defect in the vocal tract, as it was studied in the 1940s and 50s, or it can be a stylized way of speaking, either consciously or unconsciously,” Casey Klofstad, an associate professor of political science at the University of Miami, tells Yahoo Lifestyle. Celebrities such as Kim and Kourtney KardashianParis Hilton, and Britney Spears have all been accused of using vocal fry to sound ditzy or feminine.

Pointing out that most of the public can’t recognize Ford’s typical voice, Klofstad says that emotions such as anger, fear, and sadness can cause the voice to deepen, due to tension in the vocal cords and increased respiration under stress. “People also speak lower when they’re feeling disgusted or trying to control their emotions,” says Klofstad. “Ford may also be lowering her voice to match the majority of voices in the room, which belong to men.”

RELATED: Celebs react to Christine Blasey Ford's testimony 

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Celebs defend Christine Blasey Ford
Dr. Ford is telling the truth. It could not be more clear. Thank you Dr. Ford for your courage today. It is a historic level of bravery.
Dr. Ford, I am in awe of your bravery.
Hero. I believe Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and I stand in awe of her bravery and fortitude on behalf of all who have been in her shoes. #believewomen #believesurvivors
I find Dr. Blasey Ford extremely credible and sympathetic. I find her responses echo many of the feelings and react… https://t.co/dCLcOl4A7z
Thank you Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. https://t.co/hjt7GdaAoU
Just walked by two construction workers: “Dr. Ford is doing really well.” “Good! She’s great.” “Yeah. And Chuck Gra… https://t.co/92hY7Q8i7I
I do NOT know how I got home after I was raped at 15. No memory of it. Neither does she. #ChristinaBlaseyFord
Dr. Ford is a courageous and credible person. I have deep respect for her, and I thank her for her testimony.
I stand with Dr. Christine Blasey Ford today & always. Thank you for your incredible courage. You are a hero.
Watching Dr. Blasey Ford just breathe is breaking me. She’s a hero.
I believe Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. https://t.co/vkJ1NYU6pt
#BelieveSurvivors #SupportSurvivors #IBelieveDrBlaseyFord. Sending strength and courage and self-care to survivors… https://t.co/T8OEJBFizC
Deepest gratitude to you #DrChristineBlaseyFord You told us that you are “terrified” - but today you embody courage.
Bravery. Dignity. Integrity. Thank you #DrChristineBlaseyFord for your courage today
Sickened that our current political environment is so toxic and partisan, that #DrChristineBlaseyFord received deat… https://t.co/lO88vG11U1
#believesurvivors
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Klofstad and his team studied vocal fry in 2014 and discovered that women are judged more harshly than men for using it. Not only is it more common among young women, it causes people to perceive them as less competent, educated, attractive, trustworthy, and hirable. The study concluded that women should avoid vocal fry in order to avoid facing workplace discrimination.

Men actually exhibit vocal fry more often than women, according to one study, although it may be less detectable due to their naturally deeper voice tones, reported Time. “Henry Kissinger and Ira Glass have heavy vocal fry, but you probably think of the Kardashians when you hear it,” observes Klofstad. “Vocal fry is sex-atypical — women are supposed to have higher voices due to lack of testosterone — so they’re penalized more for it.”

RELATED: Protesters gather in DC 

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Protesters gather in Washington D.C. ahead of Ford, Kavanaugh Senate hearing
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Protesters gather in Washington D.C. ahead of Ford, Kavanaugh Senate hearing
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters stand with their hands up while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters display notes written on their arms reading 'Believe Survivors' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No More' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters hold signs while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester displays a note on her hand that reads 'No Kavanaugh' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters hold their hands up while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Chet Strange / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHET STRANGE/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors gather in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC, in support of Christine Blasey Ford, who is testifying against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Photo by Chet Strange / AFP) (Photo credit should read CHET STRANGE/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A supporter of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh stands inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A supporter of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh wears stickers on his jacket while standing inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Supporters of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrive inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest against the appointment of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as Christine Blasey Ford testifies at a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee at Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on September 27, 2018. (Photo by Jose Luis Magana / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters in support of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stand during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A protester in support of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh wears stickers reading 'I Stand With Brett' ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Kavanaugh and a woman who accuses him of sexual assault will present dueling accounts of what happened -- or didnt happen -- 36 years ago, as senators hold a historic hearing that will shape the court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A protester wears tape over her mouth that reads 'Believe Women' while demonstrating ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. Chairman�Chuck Grassley�called for a 'safe, comfortable and dignified' hearing Thursday on a sexual assault allegation against�Brett�Kavanaugh�as the panel opened a historic hearing that promises to shape the Supreme Court's future and redefine the 'Me Too' era. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - SEPT 27: Joy Gerhard, of Seattle, cries in the Hart Senate Office Building atrium as she listens on her phone to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testify on the sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Thursday Sept. 27, 2018. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators listen to Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors rallying against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh watch testimony from Christine Blasey Ford on a smartphone inside the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators' signs lay on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors gather to demonstrate against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) poses for a photo with demonstrators during a demonstration against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Protestors and supporters of Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh watch Christine Blasey Ford's testimony from Sen. Chuck Grassley's (R-IA) office on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: A sign lays on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Demonstrators' signs lay on the floor during a protest against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. On Thursday, Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, is testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
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