This is the most hated gas station in America

When it comes to fueling up your car, you might think all gas stations are created equal. Sure, there's some variance in pricing, restrooms, location, and snack availability, but for the most part, you get your gas and go.

Still, some gas stations have managed to spoil their reputations. And according to one survey, none is more disliked than BP. The gas company ranked number 94 on a list of the 100 most reputable companies in America, according to a poll distributed by Harris Insights & Analytics. That's behind Costco, which ranked no. 17; Shell, no. 66; and ExxonMobil, no. 80.

To make its list, Harris Insights asked study participants to name companies they believed to have the best or worst overall reputations. Those companies were then ranked based on six factors: social responsibility, products and services, emotional appeal, vision and leadership, financial performance, and workplace environment. While there are certainly more than four gas station companies in America, ones that didn't make the list just aren't "visible" enough in the public eye. Essentially, these are the gas stations people felt most strongly about, for better or worse.

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Pct. negative rating: 35%

Advertising and Public Relations ranks tenth in terms of negative overall perception out of 26 industries. The industry's positive public perception had improved measurably since 2001, according to Gallup, increasing by about 23%. In spite of this improvement, it remains in the bottom 10. A recent study conducted by Harris Interactive found that 98% of people distrust the Internet, largely because of advertisements. According to the Harris poll, respondents reported feeling bombarded by too many advertisements, and that the Internet's content tended to be self-promotional.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 35%

In addition to Gallup's score, the movie industry scores seventh worst out of 48 industries evaluated by the American Consumer Index. The reasons for the negative perception of the movie industry are less clear than for banking or the oil industry. The editor in chief of Gallup, Frank Newport, suggests that some people may disapprove of the content of R-rated movies, or may frown upon the frequently televised problems the actors themselves get into. The main reason may be the high cost of movie tickets, especially when there are alternatives to renting movies and going to the theater on the internet and television.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 36%

Public impression of the television and radio industry improved slightly this year, as the percentage of Americans regarding it negatively dropped from 40% to 36%. The Gallup poll found 37% of Americans approving of the industry, while 25% described their position as neutral. Since 2001, positive overall opinions of this industry declined by about 12%. Subscription television services, like cable and satellite, received a score of 66 from the ACSI, the third worst score after airlines and newspapers in 2011. Scores and ratings this bad could be a symptom of a general distrust in the media. A Gallup survey conducted in 2012 found that Americans' confidence in television news is at a new low, with 21% of adults indicating little confidence in it. This is a small decline from last year and a significant decline from 1993, when Gallup first measured the issue and 46% of adults indicated confidence.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 37%

It will surprise almost no one that the legal field made the list. For one reason or another, lawyers are perceived negatively by Americans. According to Newport, "lawyers are one of those things that people criticize until they need one." The legal system is adversarial by definition, and lawyers work in the midst of emotional and expensive problems. It does not help matters that attorneys are regularly included among the highest-paid professions. With corporate lawyers billing at $1,000 per hour, expectations for the right outcome can be high. Nevertheless, the number of Americans who view the legal field negatively dropped slightly since last year. And since 2001, the percentage of negative rating has declined by about 18%, while Americans' positive perception has increased by 17% over the same period.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 38%

The electric and gas utilities industry can't seem to catch a break. Positive overall opinion dropped from 38% to 34% in the last year. Regarding municipal utilities in particular, ACSI ranks the industry poorly as well, with a score of 73, ranking seventh from the bottom. Utilities companies have a public history of energy shortages, brownouts, manipulating regulations to solidify monopolies, and a poor environmental record. More recently, rising energy costs could be generating dissatisfaction among the public. In ASCI's most recent company ranking, Long Island Power and Northeast Utilities received the two lowest scores in the survey.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 38%

ACSI gave health and personal care stores a score of 76, which ranks 16th from the bottom, and could help explain the negative opinions surrounding the pharmaceutical industry. The percentage of negative rating recorded by the Gallup poll improved some in 2012, from 43% to 38%. A recent Harris-Interactive study reported that 46% of people believed the pharmaceutical industry ought to be more regulated, and it was among the industries least likely to be considered honest and trustworthy. It would seem the industry's public image and trustworthiness suffers from frequent lawsuits by consumers and regulators alike, with consumers alleging the medications caused them harm and agencies charging the companies for illegal marketing or other regulatory violations. The high cost of brand-name drugs consumers must pay until generic versions become available also hurts the public's perception of the industry.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 41%

Over a 10-year period, the real estate industry's negative rating increased by 105% - an increase second only to banking. Additionally, the overall positive views have dropped by almost 20% since 2011 alone. Americans' low overall opinion of this industry is probably related to the mortgage crisis and the effects it's had on the economy in recent years. Newport has suggested that Americans are probably not reacting to individual, local realtors. Instead, respondents associate the industry with sub-prime mortgages, loans on loans, and robo-signing. That said, like lawyers, realtors are associated with often stressful situations, which might influence the public's bad impressions of the industry. In spite of its poor score, the percentage of Americans who perceive the real estate Industry negatively has declined since the Gallup survey last year, falling from 52% to 41%.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 42%

Of all the industries discussed by Gallup, health care saw the most positive change in the last year. Its positive image is also the best it has been since 2001. The Gallup report suggests that these changes may reflect the effects of the Supreme Court's June decision upholding the Affordable Care Act. Despite the 16% increase in positive ratings since 2001, the health care industry still polled as one of the most negatively perceived industries. Newport noted that "although a lot of Americans in our surveys tell us they are actually satisfied with their personal health care . . . [the] image of the health care industry in general is more negative, because Americans hear so many problems about it."


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 53%

The overall negative ratings for this industry has increased significantly from 20% in 2001 to 53% this year. The percentage of positive ratings has also declined by nearly 50% since 2001. The poor image of the banking industry is fairly straightforward, having "been involved in major issues since Lehman brothers in 2008, and it still looks like a problem," Newport says. In addition, Americans' perception may be affected by the high fees banks charge consumers.The high volume of scandals both in the U.S. and in Europe exposes flaws in the industry and undermine the public's confidence in its effectiveness.Bank of America has built an infamous public image with false foreclosures, property seizures, misleading mortgage adjustment programs, and other controversial conduct. Scandals like these could be fueling the perception that the banking industry is only profit-oriented and functioning at the expense of the average American.

By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

Pct. negative rating: 61%

Nearly two-thirds of Americans have a negative overall view of the oil and gas industry, falling below the U.S. government in the eyes of the public. In 2011, ACSI gave gas stations a score of 74, which placed it 11th from the bottom out of 48 industries. At the time of the 2012 Gallup survey, gasoline prices were on the rise. Plus, as Newport pointed out, people have to deal with the oil and gas industry every day when they put gas in their car "and they see prices inexplicably zoom up, and they're not sure why." Increasingly high revenues and government tax breaks may be one explanation for the oil and gas industry's poor public image. The Gallup report also suggests that some Americans believe the industry has a poor environmental record, which is not always confined to events off-shore, or abroad. A fire broke out at one of Chevron's oil refinery in Richmond, California last week, resulting in thousands of emergency room visits and potentially harmful exposure to toxic fumes. Accidents like than can only harm the industry's image.


By Michael B. Sauter and Thomas C. Frohlich

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It's safe to say BP's reputation might have been permanently damaged following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which lasted 87 days and took place on the BP-operated Macondo Prospect. Pricing might've also come into play. Costco is the cheapest place to buy gas in 17 states. Shell is the cheapest option in two states, and BP is cheapest in just one, Rhode Island. Here are more reasons to start buying gas at Costco.

The next time you stop for gas, take a second to think about how that station makes your trip memorable—or miserable. Now, make sure you know these 12 myths you need to stop believing about your car.

The post This Is the Most Hated Gas Station in America appeared first on Reader's Digest.

RELATED: Check out this beautifully transformed gas station

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Former gas stations transformed
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Former gas stations transformed
Shell fuel pumps are seen in the front garden of Manor Road Garage petrol station built in an art deco style. After the buisness closed the building decayed until being converted into flats in East Preston, West Sussex, Britain, April 28, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
Shell fuel pumps are seen in the front garden of Manor Road Garage petrol station built in an art deco style. After the buisness closed the building decayed until being converted into flats in East Preston, West Sussex, Britain, April 28, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A former petrol station, now used as a furniture and car sales room as well as vehicle repairs centre, is seen on a minor road near Telford, Britain, April 5, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A cyclist rides past a boarded-up petrol station, used as an open-air cinema as well as a car wash since its closure, now awaiting commercial redevelopment in a prime real estate location in the Clerkenwell district of central London, Britain, October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A man walks past an employee arranging bouquets at a florist business on the site of a former petrol station in north London, Britain, October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A London bus and taxi drive past a former petrol station forecourt, now used as a bar, cafe and food court area in Shoreditch in east London, Britain, March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A modern classic Ford car is seen through the showroom window of a former petrol station, now used as a furniture and car sales room as well as vehicle repairs centre, near Telford, Britain, April 5, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
Visitors and car enthusiasts walk in front of restored Shell petrol pumps as they attend the Goodwood Revival historic motor racing festival, an annual event celebrating a mid-twentieth century heyday of the racing circuit, near Chichester, Britain, September 9, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A woman walks into a burger restaurant sited on the forecourt of Bloomsbury Service Station, built in 1926 and closed down in 2006, in London, Britain, February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
The Black Cat Garage, which has been shut for over a decade, is seen on a minor road near Tiverton in Devon, Britain, July 29, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
An old petrol pump is seen at the entrance to a house in a village near Stroud in the Cotswolds, Britain October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A disused petrol pump hose is seen hanging outside a front door next to an independent garage which shut two years ago with an application to convert to residential properties, on a street front in Olney, Britain, October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A customer sign is seen at the Black Cat Garage which has been shut for over a decade, on a minor road near Tiverton, Devon, Britain, July 29, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
A rusting old petrol pump outside a long-closed rural village petrol station is seen on a minor road near Trowbridge, Britain, October 21, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
Rusting old petrol pumps outside a long-closed rural village petrol station are seen on a minor road near Trowbridge, Britain, October 21, 2016. REUTERS/Toby Melville 
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