Mom blames hot chips after daughter’s gallbladder had to be removed

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — A Memphis mother has a warning after she says her daughter's gallbladder was removed, and she believes it's all because of hot snacks.

"When my daughter had to have this surgery, I knew I had to tell everybody about it," Rene Craighead said.

Wildly popular hot snacks — like Hot Cheetos, Takis and Hot Fries — are getting snatched off of shelves. You can find the hot chips at virtually any convenience store.

Craighead said the doctor told her hot chips were behind the stomach problems her 17-year-old daughter was having.

"She loves them. Every time I go out she says, 'Bring me back some Hot Takis, bring me back some Hot Chips.' I want to maker her happy, so I brought them back. She was eating big bags and would take them to school with her," Craighead said.

Her daughter, also named Rene, started feeling sick to her stomach.

That soon led to surgery and the removal of her gallbladder.

"I was surprised that my daughter was sick like that," the mother said.

The Craigmont High student estimates she was eating around four bags of hot snacks a week.

It's not just the taste that makes them appealing. The hot snacks cost around a dollar for a regular size bag.

"We do see tons of gastritis and ulcer-related stuff due to it," Dr. Cary Cavender, with Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, said.

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Dr. Cary Canvender, a gastroenterologist at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, says there's a lot of factors that go into having a gallbladder removed. But he believes eating the chips probably contributed.

The doctor says the number of children they see with stomach problems due to the chips is staggering.

"We probably see around 100 kids a month, easily."

Dr. Cavender advises that parents monitor their child's diet and load up on those fruits and veggies.

In a statement regarding Takis, Buchanan Public Relations released a statement saying:

"We assure you that Takis are safe to eat, but should be enjoyed in moderation as part of a well-balanced diet. Takis ingredients fully comply with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations, and all of the ingredients in each flavor are listed in detail on the label. Always check the serving size before snacking."

They go on to say they take complaints very seriously and are happy to connect with the customer.

Frito-Lay, the maker of Cheetos, also responded, saying:

“At Frito-Lay, food safety is always our number one priority, and our snacks meet all applicable food safety regulations as well as our rigorous quality standards. Some consumers may be more sensitive to spicy foods than others and may choose to avoid spicier snacks due to personal preference.”

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Gallbladder: $1,219

Pair of eyeballs: $1,525

Scalp: $607
Skull with teeth: $1,200
Shoulder: $500
Coronary artery: $1,525
Heart: $119,000
Liver: $157,000
Hand and Forearm: $385
Spleen: $508
Stomach: $508
Small Intestine: $2,519
Kidney: $262,000 (in the U.S.)
Skin: $10 per square inch
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