'White nonsense': Prada's $500 t-shirt featuring political activist Angela Davis

Prada just released a T-shirt featuring the face of a famous activist, and many are not buying it.

The brand's SS18 collection was splashed with comic book heroines drawn by different female artists from the 1940s to today. Of this campaign, which was presented this past September, Italian designer Miuccia Prada said she was "interested in someone who can be active and present today. ... Just wanting to change the world. Especially for women, because there's so much against us, still."

One of the female faces featured throughout the collection is that of Angela Davis, an African-American educator and activist for social justice, civil rights, and other issues like gender equality. Her name became synonymous with activism in the 1960s and '70s. And Prada, who Women's Wear Daily called a "politically literate, ardent feminist," is carrying it into the current decade by putting a very recognizable comic book depiction of Davis on a T-shirt and coat.

RELATED: See more of the activist

23 PHOTOS
Angela Davis over the years
See Gallery
Angela Davis over the years
1977 poster showing portrait of Angela Davis, Co Chairperson - National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression Speaking at a Rally for Human Rights. (Photo by David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Images)
American Political Activist Angela Davis (Photo by ?? Miroslav Zaj??c/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Portrait de la militante am�icaine Angela Davis. (Photo by Michelle VIGNES/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
American Political Activist Angela Davis (Photo by ?? Miroslav Zaj??c/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
African-American activist Angela Davis, w. Afro haircut, speaking at first congress of the Havana-based Organization of Latin American Solidarity (OLAS). (Photo by Lee Lockwood/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Philosophy professor Angela Davis said today at a press conference that a court decision ruling that Communists cannot be barred from teaching further exposes Governor Reagan and the Board of Regents 'as the unscrupulous demagogues that they are.' Miss Davis hailed yesterday's court decision as a 'tremendous victory' during the press conference.
American revolutionary and educator Angela Davis sits with her head on her hand, shortly after she was fired from her post as philosophy professor at UCLA due to her membership of the Communist Party of America, 27th November 1969. Davis followed up her brilliant early academic career by joining the Black Panthers and being listed on the FBI Most Wanted list. She was acquitted of all charges and continues to be a writer, educator, and activist for race, class, and gender equality. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Close-up portrait of American political activist and scholar Angela Davis during her incarceration, 1970. (Photo by Peter Davis/Getty Images)
An evening with American activist and philosophy professor Angela Davis at Madison Square Garden, New York, 29th June 1972. Davis had recently been acquitted of homicide charges following a controversial trial. (Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)
Picture released on May 31, 1972 of US communist militant Angela Davis (R) talking to her lawyer Leo Branton Jr. during her trial , in San Jose. Angela Davis was acquitted on charges of murder, kidnapping and conspiracy arising from the 07 August 1970 shooting in the same courthouse, in which a judge and three other people were killed. / AFP / PRESSENS BILD / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) San Jose, California: Angela Davis, Communist writer and militant activist, outside courthouse in San Jose during her trial for kidnapping and murder.
Picture released on April 1972 of US communist militant Angela Davis arriving at the court for her trial , in San Jose. Angela Davis was acquitted on charges of murder, kidnapping and conspiracy arising from the 07 August 1970 shooting in the same courthouse, in which a judge and three other people were killed. / AFP / PRESSENS BILD / STRINGER AND STR (Photo credit should read STRINGER,STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Angela Davis awaits her murder-kidnap trial outside courthouse today.
(Original Caption) 10/13/1970-New York, NY- Black revolutionary Angela Davis is handcuffed between two FBI agents Oct. 13 as she leaves FBI headquarters here for an undisclosed destination. She had been sought for murder and kidnapping in the California courtroom shootout that killed four persons.
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 13: Angela Davis after being arrested leaving FBI headquarters on E. 69th St. (Photo by Richard Corkery/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) San Jose, Calif.: Angela Davis, militant on trial for alleged activities in connection with Marin County Court shootout, attends her first news conference since being released on bail, February 24th.
APR 28 1973, APR 29 1973; Indian Leader Vernon Bellecourt Speaks at Rally; ***** Angela Davis, California Black leader, and Rodolfo Gonzales, Colorado Chicano leader.; (Photo By Dave Buresh/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
Sofia, Bulgaria. Member of the US Communist Party Angela Davis during her meeting with the youth of Socialist capitals of the world. Valentin Kuzmin/TASS (Photo by TASS via Getty Images)
LA COURNEUVE, FRANCE: US militant Angela Davis (L) listens to the secretary-general of the French Communist Party, Georges Marchais, 08 September 1973 during the traditional FOte de l'HumanitT, annual outdoor communist gathering, in La Courneuve outside Paris. (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
APR 28 1973, APR 29 1973; Indian Leader Vernon Bellecourt Speaks At Rally; Giving attention are Angela Davis, Colorado Chicano leader.; (Photo By Dave Buresh/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Angela Davis, (R) shown at a Chicago news conference 5/11 with Rev. Ben Chavis, (L) of Wilmington, N.C., and American Indian Movement leader Clyde Bellecourt, announced the formation of an organization 'against racist and political repression.' She said our purpose will be primarily to build support to end repressive legislation and police brutality. She said 'We need some kind of weapon that will defend the right of people to struggle.'
(Original Caption) Chicago, Illinois: Angela Davis at a 5/3 news conference. Ms. Davis is now co-chairperson of the National Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression (NAARPR). The conference was to inform the media about the upcoming 10th Anniversary Conference of the NAARPR to 'Stop Repression and Racist Violence.'
Veteran US militant Angela Davis (R) is met 30 August 1991 by anti-apartheid campaigner Winnie Mandela, wife of anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela, at Jan Smuts airport in Johannesburg at the start of her two-week visit to South Africa. / AFP PHOTO / Trevor SAMSON (Photo credit should read TREVOR SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

In the image, which was the back page of a 1970 all-female comic book, It Ain't Me Babe, Davis is rocking her signature Afro and red turtleneck, and the words "Right on!" appear in a thought bubble.

The tee just went on sale, as well as the coat version that Yara Shahidi is pictured in, but people are not buying Prada's efforts. Why? Isn't this a great statement? The artist responsible for the drawing certainly thinks so. "It was lovely for [Miuccia Prada] to use the Angela Davis one," cartoonist Trina Robbins told Snobette.

But many are not sold on the price tags — $500 for a T-shirt and $1,700 for a coat — pointing out that the unattainable price contradicts Davis's message. People are unhappy that people Davis fights for wouldn't be able to afford the clothing, saying that Prada is capitalizing on Davis's activism.

"Peak capitalism: a luxury brand (gross, @Prada) colonizing the image of comrade Angela Davis to sell a coat that cost more than people living in poverty earn in a month. Hell nah," someone pointed out on Twitter. "What claim does @Prada have to Angela Davis and anything she stood for? Profiting from another's pain is not a good look," said another.

Others feel Prada just doesn't care about or understand Davis's beliefs. "I don't see how anyone who's read even a paragraph of Angela Davis's work would be comfortable putting her likeness on a $1,700 Prada jacket...?" said a Twitter user. "I hate to be captain obvious here but.. it comes as no surprise to me that there is, likely, nobody at Prada who has really read ANY of Angela Davis' work."

Then there are those who just think that Davis, now 74, won't approve and are worried that she won't see any of the profit from Prada using her likeness.

So, if you agree with the argument (or simply don't want to break the bank) but like the design and want to rock Davis's inspiring expression, you have options.

Read more from Yahoo Lifestyle:

Follow us onInstagram,Facebook, andTwitterfor nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day.

Read Full Story
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
Like AOL Lifestyle on Facebook