Emaciated dog left to die on side of Pennsylvania

CHESTER, PA  -  A dog at the Providence Animal Center is fighting for his life after being found on the side of East 11th Street in Chester.

On Tuesday, officials say the severely emaciated dog was found near Deshong Park, wrapped in a blanket, placed among the broken glass and trash, and left to die.

Justina Calgiano of the Providence Animal Center in Media says on Tuesday, they got a call about a dog having trouble breathing. One of their humane officers went to the park and found the dog. Calgiano said he was, “…very, very skinny. He was completely skin and bones. He couldn’t even lift his head. We found sly in a blanket, tucked into the woods, and he was just in a really, really sad shape.”

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Dogs rescued from South Korea meat farms
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Dogs rescued from South Korea meat farms
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
A dog is pictured in a cage at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the dog farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
Rescued dogs are seen as they wait for transport, at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A dog collar is seen at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Dogs are pictured in cages at a dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Dogs rescued by Humane Society International (HSI) from a dog meat farm in South Korea await transport to a local shelter in order to be adopted in Washington, December 14, 2015. Twenty-six rescued dogs were divided among five Emergency Placement Partner shelters in the Washington area to find their new homes. HSI is working to reduce the dog meat trade in Asia, including in South Korea where dogs are farmed for the trade. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a crate at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a crate at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the dog farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, a dog looks out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, Lola Webber of the Humane Society International (HSI) interacts with a dog in a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the HSI in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, members of the Humane Society International (HSI) carry a dog in a crate for transport at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the HSI in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, dogs look out from a cage at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
In this picture taken on November 28, 2017, dogs are seen in cages at a dog farm during a rescue event, involving the closure of the farm organised by the Humane Society International (HSI) in Namyangju on the outskirts of Seoul. The tradition of consuming dog meat has declined as the nation increasingly embraces the idea of dogs as pets instead of livestock, with eating them now something of a taboo among young South Koreans. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je / TO GO WITH SKorea-agriculture-food-dog, FEATURE by Jung Ha-Won (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
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They named him Sly after Slyvester Stallone’s famous boxing character “Rocky,” because the veterinarians helping him say he’s a fighter.

“It was determined that he had an intestinal blockage.  He had a rope toy, or what looked like a tiny mop inside of him. So we performed emergency surgery to remove that blockage, and Sly is in our care, recovering right now,” explained Calgiano.

Officials working on the case say when he was found, he had an abdominal shave, as well as a shave on his arm where a catheter might go, which indicates he may have received prior vet care.

Calgiano said, “We can put together is perhaps a family tried to figure out what was going on with him; perhaps why he was so skinny, and determined they might not be able to afford treatment and maybe they just got rid of him…We need people to know that that is not ok and that’s not an appropriate way of handling your pet.”

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10. German Shorthaired Pointer 

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9. Yorkshire Terrier 

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8. Rottweiler

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7. Poodle

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6. Beagle

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5. Bulldog

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4. French Bulldog

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3. Golden Retriever

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2. German Shepherd 

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1. Labrador

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Officials with Providence Animal Center say right now their investigators are looking into where he may have been treated or if anyone recognizes him.

“We really just need to figure out who did this to Sly and why they did it, and figure out how we can get justice for him…whatever that really means. Our hope is that we will be able to find him a forever home.”

Updates on Sly’s condition are being posted on the Animal Center’s Facebook Page.

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