Makeup courses for blind Brazilian women boost self-image

SAO PAULO, April 19 (Reuters) - No mirrors needed by these women when they apply eye-liner, mascara and blush brushes. They can't see their faces.

Blind women are being taught makeup techniques and even how to put on false eyelashes in courses given by a Sao Paulo beauty salon, and it works wonders for their self-esteem.

"People say why do you put on makeup if you can't see it. But I am so happy that I can do it confidently now," said Ana Paula de Camargo, a 30-year-old housewife, as she asked the instructor to photograph her.

The free courses held at the Laramara association for blind people on the west side of Sao Paulo are offered by the Jacques Janine salon to help women overcome the challenges of doing their own makeup. Braille dots on the cosmetics allow them to find the shadow colors and brushes they need.

See inside the life-changing course: 

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Courses teach makeup skills to blind women
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Courses teach makeup skills to blind women
Keilane, 24, who is visually impaired and has 20 percent of vision, applies false eyelashes during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 11, 2018. Picture taken April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Ana Paula (L), 27, and Camila (R), 27, who are visually impaired, get make up put on during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Tayna (L), 22, and Alexandra (R), 47, who are blind, get make up put on by their teacher during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Keilane, 24, who is visually impaired and has 20 percent of vision, holds false eyelashes before getting make up put on during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 11, 2018. Picture taken April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Flavia, 28, who is visually impaired, gets make up put on by her teacher during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Blind women apply make up during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Ana Paula (L), 27, and Camila (R), 27, who are visually impaired, apply make up next to their teacher during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
A bottle of Black Mascara with Braille writing on it is seen as Maria, 44, who is blind, gets make up put on during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Tayna, 22, who is blind, reads Braille writing on a lipstick before she has make up put on during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Blind women talk after their cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Keilane, who is visually impaired and has 20 percent of vision, applies make up during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self-esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 11, 2018. Picture taken April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Ana Paula, 27, who is visually impaired, looks at the colours with her left eye, which has 15 percent of vision, before she has make up put on during a cosmetics class set up to help boost self esteem at the Laramara association in Sao Paulo, Brazil April 18, 2018. Picture taken April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Not having to depend on someone else for their makeup and losing the fear of doing it wrong was awesome, said Alexandra da Silva, 47, as she put on violet lipstick.

"Who says I can't see my face? Maybe not like other people. But I imagine my face and I believe I am beautiful," said Maria Mirian Callange, a 44-year-old accupuncturist with failing vision. "Now I can increase my beauty." (Reporting by Pablo Garcia and Nacho Doce; Writing by Anthony Boadle; Editing by Phil Berlowitz)

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