Salvation Army is opening up a new non-profit grocery store

As home cooks, it’s in our DNA to care about others. From sending care packages to family to making a meal for the new parents down the block, it gives us the warm-and-fuzzies when food and community collide. That’s why we’re so stoked for the Salvation Army’s latest feat.

The First of Its Kind

This month, the Salvation Army opened its first non-profit grocery store under the name DMG Foods—which refers to the Salvation Army’s slogan: “Doing the Most Good.” DMG Foods’s mission is to expand food availability for the community while also meeting the immediate needs of its customers.

The 7,000 square-foot flagship DMG Foods store is located in East Baltimore, Maryland and was designed to provide healthy and affordable food for families and individuals receiving SNAP benefits (SNAP is the largest program in the nation offering nutrition assistance to the needy) plus social services including nutritional guidance, shopping education, workforce development, and meal planning. It’s believed to be the first grocery store to provide such services.

RELATED: Top secrets from America's top grocery stores:

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Competitor coupons at Publix

Did you see a coupon from a competitor instead of Publix? Bring that coupon with you! Publix posts a list of competitors at each store, allowing you to bring in a coupon you saw elsewhere and get that same deal right at Publix.

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Double coupon policy at Wegmans

Speaking of coupons, Wegmans offers a stellar deal with their double coupon policy. If you saw a coupon from a manufacturer that was less than $0.99 in value, Wegmans will not only give you that coupon but will also reward you with another $0.99 off. If the price is above $1, they will still give you the coupon’s face-value deal. Don't miss these 19 shopping tricks all frugal shoppers use.

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Return policy at Trader Joe's

Hated the recent flavor of Joe Joes? Just return them! That’s right, even after trying something, you can actually return it if you found it unbearable. Trader Joe’s will happily take it back and give you a refund.

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Combos Locos deals at H-E-B

Do you get coupons for H-E-B? If not, well, you should. H-E-B offers a coupon deal called Combos Locos where, when buying two items together, you get discounted prices. For example, a deal could include a bag of salad with a free bottle of dressing! Keep an eye out for deals on their website. Here are more sneaky ways to find great deals online.

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Bargain bins at Aldi

Nope, these bargain bins actually aren’t a rip off (like some bargain bins turn out to be). You are going to want to take advantage of the incredible deals at Aldi’s bargain bin because the low prices will actually knock your socks off.

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B1G1 and B2G3 sales at Harris Teeter

Buy-one-get-one deals, or even buy-two-get-three deals, are always a draw for people trying to buy bulk at a grocery store, But what make’s Harris Teeter special is the secret behind those deals. Instead of offering one item full price and another completely free, the items just ring up as half off. So if you only need one pound of meat and don’t have room in your freezer for another, that meat will still ring up as 50 percent off! Plus, try making these healthy food swaps that can actually save you money.

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Fuel Saver + Perks program at Hy-Vee

Loved the fuel saver program through Hy-Vee? Well, their new-and-improved program is going to have you jumping out of your seat. With this new membership, you can save big using digital deals and coupons target specifically for your shopping list, receive surprise savings, and even get the chance to win rewards! Some of those include kitchen makeovers, vacation packages and even a new car.

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The back of the store at Costco

That’s right—the back of the store is where you’re going to find all of the deals. By working your way forward, you are finding the best bang for your buck. Make sure to walk through “center court” (the savings aisles in the center of the store) and to avoid the front at all costs. The front is known as “action alley” and will rarely give you the type of deals that you crave. Check out these money-saving things you can do at Costco without a membership.

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The jobs at WinCo

Not only are WinCo deals even cheaper than Walmart most of the time, they also offer incredible employee benefits. Like being a part-owner of the store, for example. If you work at WinCo for over 500 hours in the first six months and 1,000 hours in a year, you are eligible for the Employee Stock Ownership program. They also offer incredible benefits including retirement savings and insurance.

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The app from Whole Foods

Whole Foods may sit more on the expensive side, but their app can actually help you save those dollar bills. It’s completely free and loaded with coupons and current deals, giving you a leg up on what to grab in the grocery store.

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Free Item Fridays at Fry's and Kroger

Because Fry’s is a Kroger brand, these two offer the same incredible deal every week—free item Fridays! Find out what you can get for free by downloading the coupon the day before heading to the grocery store.

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Meal deals at Winn Dixie

Every week Winn Dixie offers meal deals where they hand you not one, not two, but three items for free. The meal deal typically comes with a specifically chosen entree. Once you get the entree, you can get the chosen sides (typically a carbohydrate, a vegetable, and a dessert) for free.

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Tuesdays at Target

You may not realize it, but most department stores work off a markdown schedule in certain departments each day of the week. Although every store is different, shopping at Target’s Market (the grocery part of the store) is best for savings on Tuesday. However, there is no harm in asking a sales associate when your local Target’s specific markdown schedule is. Here are more sneaky ways to save money at Target.

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Super Coupons at ShopRite

If you still love to get coupons mailed to your home, then you better be digging for those ShopRite super coupons. These coupons will offer you deals you probably couldn’t even dream about and will make your wallet sing songs of praise. You can also check out a lot of their other coupon deals online at their Digital Coupon Center.

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The MVP kiosk at Food Lion

After signing up for the MVP Program at Food Lion, you’ll want to take advantage of their kiosk ASAP. Simply scan your MVP card when you’re in the store to see what deals are going on for that day, and even a set of personalized coupons based on your recent purchases. But be on the lookout for these 32 retail scams that trick you into spending more.

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SimpleNutrition tags at Albertsons

Just like their Everyday Low Prices and Club Card Savings, Albertsons offers deals on their healthy products by using their SimpleNutrition tags. So instead of ignoring those healthier foods because of the prices, scout Albertsons for these tags to save big and eat healthily.

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Free item codes at Meijer

Every now and then, Meijer will post codes on their Facebook and Twitter for mPerk members to get free items. They offer all sorts of items for free, and if you follow them on social media, you’ll always come across some incredible deals. Make sure you memorize the best times to buy cheap finds throughout the year.

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Cash back at Sam's Club

That’s right—they just hand it to you! For every $500 you spend, you get $10 back. That may not seem like a lot, but if you’re a faithful Sam’s Club shopper, that can seriously add up as the year progresses. Don't miss these other surprisingly simple ways to save big at the supermarket.

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SavingStar at Stop & Shop

If you have a Stop & Shop card (or a Giant card, since they are owned by the same company) you can actually earn cash back when using some of the offers. Just click the offers you want to use on the app.

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The price match policy at Walmart

Saw a cheaper price somewhere else? Bring those ads with you to Walmart! You can get the cheaper deal by showing the associate that pricing, who can then walk you through a process to get that same deal right at the store. Wherever you shop, just make sure you avoid these 50 supermarket tricks you still fall for.

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How DMG Foods is Different

The Salvation Army of Central Maryland worked with the Baltimore Development Corp, The Baltimore Food Initiative, and The Maryland Food Bank (MFB) to design the concept, and the store is operated in partnership with the MFB. It has a butcher counter, a deli featuring lunch meats and prepared foods, a bakery, a dairy department, and 15,000 shelved items that are expected to afford 5% savings over traditional grocery stores.

In addition, the store’s Red Shield Club loyalty program provides special offers and discounts (here’s how to save money at your grocery store). The meal planning services include daily cooking demonstrations (and if you don’t think meal planning makes a big difference, then you need to read this true story on how doing so changed one woman’s life). In addition, those who self-identify as government assistance recipients qualify for complimentary food items monthly. And there’s this: The store itself will create at least 15 new jobs in the area.

Why East Baltimore?

The East Baltimore location was selected because it’s a “Healthy Food Priority Area” (formerly known as a “food desert”) under Baltimore law. It’s a residential area where the median household income is at least 185% below the Federal Poverty Level, over 30% of households have no vehicle, the distance to a supermarket is more than 1/4 mile, and healthy food options (such as lean protein, whole wheat grains, low-fat dairy, and produce) are in low supply.

 
We can’t wait to see what plans the Salvation Army has next! Do the most good in your own neighborhood. Check out the company’s website to learn how to give back.

20 PHOTOS
Salvation Army's Red Kettle Campaign through the years
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Salvation Army's Red Kettle Campaign through the years

A.J. Bromfield, left, a Salvation Army advisory board vice president of Western Federal Savings, and Lt. Edward World, Salvation Army officer, helped open the drive on December 1, 1963.  

(Photo By Bill Johnson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

That's the first one, the first contribution to the Salvation Army's 1967 Christmas Kettle campaign. Walter Hoving, board chairman of Tiffany's, kicked off the campaign with his check in ceremonies at 57th St. and 5th Avenue.

(Photo by Vic DeLucia/New York Post Archives via Getty Images)

Mrs. Maryann Brewster tends the kettle and smiles as a donor puts a dime into a Salvation Army kettle in 1969.

(Photo By Bill Johnson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Salvation Army auxiliary volunteers wearing turn-of-the century Salvation Army costumes, Mrs. William Argall, left, and Mrs. Tor Westgaard manned Army's Chirstmas Kettle at Larimer Square in 1970.

(Photo By Millard Smith/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Salvation Army volunteer Teresa Valverde rings her bell while collecting donations November 20, 2001 in New York City. The Salvation Army's 2001 National Kettle Campaign kick-off was held earlier in the day in New York.

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Santa Claus played by Harry Winters lifts up Justine Stewart (center), 4, of Valinda so that she can put a dollar in the Salvation Army kettle as her twin sister Jessica (right) watches on the Calico Stage at Knott's Berry Farm in Buena Park on Friday morning. The Salvation Army's Christmas campaign to collects donations for needy families.

(Photo by Kari Rene Hall/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Vancouver Salvation Army kettle attendant, Cameron Burke, processes a debit card donation with a wireless Interact machine known as the Schlumberger Magic 9000 December 21, 2003 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The Salvation Army in Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton are test piloting the Interact and, if successful, next year may take major credit cards to continue to raise money for the needy at Christmas time.

(Photo by Don MacKinnon/Getty Images)

A customer coming out of a Wal-Mart store donates to the Salvation Army as bell ringer Karrie Stasson watches on December 17, 2004 in Anaheim, California. The Salvation Army has announced that the Wal-Mart & Sam's Club Foundation were matching customers' Red Kettle contributions at more than 3,600 stores nationwide up to $1 million, through Christmas Eve, to help needy families in more than 9,000 communities across the country.

(Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Reggie Brown lands in the Salvation Army donation kettle after missing a touchdown pass during the first half of NFL football action against the Dallas Cowboys in Irving, Texas December 16, 2007.

(REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi)

A pedestrian makes a donation to the red kettle on the 16th Street Mall where Salvation Army Bell Ringer Merrill Fie is joined by his grandchildren, Tuesday, December 21, 2010. Fie is celebrating his 55th year of volunteering with the Salvation Army and is happy to be passing on the tradition to his family. He says, As I became familiar with the Salvation Army's work I realized this was for me. The Army is a good steward of peoples money. They manage to help the most people. They're administrative cost is very low. It's the best of the charities in seeing the money hit the pavement.' Looking at his grandchildren he says, 'I want to instill that in my grandchildren- to do good things for others. That will add great dimension to their lives.'

(Craig F. Walker/ The Denver Post) 

Sarah Bicking, 4, makes a donation to a Red Kettle on the 16th Street Mall, where Salvation Army Bell Ringer Merrill Fie was joined by his grandchildren on the 16th Street Mall, Tuesday, December 21, 2010. Fie is celebrating his 55th year of volunteering with the Salvation Army and is happy to be passing on the tradition to his family. He says, As I became familiar with the Salvation Army's work I realized this was for me. The Army is a good steward of peoples money. They manage to help the most people. They're administrative cost is very low. It's the best of the charities in seeing the money hit the pavement.' Looking at his grandchildren he says, 'I want to instill that in my grandchildren- to do good things for others. That will add great dimension to their lives.'

(Craig F. Walker/ The Denver Post)

U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) is seen with Tucson Mayor Bob Walkup (R) at a Red Kettle program to raise money for the Salvation Army in Tucson, Arizona in this December 13, 2010 photo made available by the office of Rep. Giffords for Reuters on January 11, 2011. Giffords was in critical condition at a Tucson hospital but is "holding her own," responding to simple commands and breathing without the aid of her ventilation tube, her doctor said.

(REUTERS/U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' office/Handout)

Salvation Army bell ringer volunteers William Schmidt (L), who is on his 20th year volunteering, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (R) ring their bells looking for a donation into a kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Salvation Army volunteers traditionally are seen collecting donations from holiday shopper for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt says he does it, ' to teach others the joy of giving.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Salvation Army bell ringer volunteers William Schmidt (L), who is on his 20th year volunteering, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (R) ring their bells hoping for a donation into a kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Salvation Army volunteers traditionally are seen collecting donations from holiday shopper for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt says he does it, 'to teach others the joy of giving'.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

A young boy makes a donation as his parents stand off camera into a Salvation Army kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Bell ringers William Schmidt, who has worked as a volunteer for 20 years here, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (neither seen) volunteer for the Salvation Army to collect donations from holiday shoppers for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt does it all 'to teach others the joy of giving'.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

William Schmidt (R), and his grandson Bubba Wellens (L) pose for a photo when Schmidt's wife, Pat (C) shows up to check on her volunter family working in the cold at a Salvation Army donation kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Bell ringers William Schmidt, who has worked as a volunteer for 20 years at this store, and his grandson Bubba Wellens volunteer for the Salvation Army to collect donations from holiday shoppers for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt does it all 'to teach others the joy of giving'. 

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Bill Rollins, music director for Salvation Army, plays his instrument for the Salvation Army of Massachusetts Red Kettle 2012 campaign kick off, held by Brewer Fountain on the Boston Common.

(Photo by David L Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

A Walmart shopper drops change into the Salvation Army Kettle in Biddeford Friday, Dec. 20, 2013.

(Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

A fan donates to the Salvation Army red kettle before an NHL game between the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs on December 10, 2014 at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Michigan.

(Photo by Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott (21) jumps into the Salvation Army red kettle after scoring a second quarter touchdown against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

(Richard W. Rodriguez/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)

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