Two dogs died after eating poisonous mushrooms in their backyard

A North Carolina woman is mourning the unexpected death of two of her pups, the Raleigh, N.C., TV station WRAL reports.

Janna Joyner came home to find her dogs Drago, a 3-year-old Saint Bernard, and Adoni, an 8-year-old lab retriever mix, dead. After she rushed them to a vet, blood samples revealed the dogs had amatoxin in their system, a toxin found in poisonous mushrooms. It appears the two pets ate the mushrooms while playing in her backyard.

Joyner now urges pet owners to be careful and wants to warn them about the mortality of some mushrooms. Joyner explained that her dogs were like her babies.

“A dog that consumes [Amanita] mushrooms can go from healthy to very clinically sick, to die within 24 to 48 hours. So it’s a very rapid disease syndrome,” said David Dorman, a toxicology professor at N.C. State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

RELATED: 25 of the smartest dog breeds:

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25 of the smartest dog breeds
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25 of the smartest dog breeds

BORDER COLLIE

According to Coren, these dogs are able to learn a new command in under five seconds and follow it at least 95 percent of the time.

POODLE

Second place on Coren’s list of smartest pups, these beauties are also great family dogs and hypoallergenic.

GERMAN SHEPHERD

There’s a reason why these guys make great crime-fighting pals—they’re obedient and alert (and handsome, too).

GOLDEN RETRIEVER

The ultimate family-friendly dog, these pooches are loyal, whip smart and very patient.

DOBERMAN PINSCHER

Playful and fun-loving, this breed is easy to train and fiercely loyal.

SHETLAND SHEEPDOG

Hey, only a highly intelligent breed would be able to raise a pig. (If you don’t get this Babereference, please go rent the movie immediately.)

LABRADOR RETRIEVER

The most popular dog breed in America is also one of the smartest. Great with families, these guys are loving and loyal.

PAPILLON

Named after the French word for “butterfly” (just look at those sweet, pointed ears), this toy breed is intelligent, energetic and friendly.

ROTTWEILER

Fans of children’s book Good Dog, Carl won’t be surprised to discover that rotties are fearless, devoted and confident. (And also very obedient, according to Coren.)

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG

No wonder these canines are such excellent work dogs. But even without cows to herd, this breed makes great companions thanks to their obedience, loyalty and protective nature.

PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI

We wouldn’t expect anything less from Her Majesty’s favorite breed.

MINIATURE SCHNAUZER

Full of energy, these friendly pups are fast learners and sociable (and they have the best mustaches).

ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIEL

Affectionate, athletic and attentive, these tail-waggers were bred as hunting dogs.

BELGIAN TERVUREN

Ideal watchdogs, these pooches are highly trainable and have boundless energy.

SCHIPPERKE

From the Belgian region of Flanders, this breed is curious, confident and clever. (Although these small pups definitely think they’re bigger than they are.)

BELGIAN SHEEPDOG

Those Belgians really know a thing or two about smart pooches, don’t they?

COLLIE

Well, duh—have you never seen Lassie before?

KEESHOND

Outgoing and playful, this sturdy breed is known for the markings around their eyes that looks like glasses.

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER

Cooperative and trainable, these pups are popular hunting dogs so they need plenty of exercise.

FLAT-COATED RETRIEVER

Great with kids, this friendly breed is also a popular therapy dog.

ENGLISH COCKER SPANIEL

With their soft and luxurious coat, these guys love being friendly with kids, adults and even other pups. 

STANDARD SCHNAUZER

Devoted, loving and playful, these guys are also hypoallergenic.

BRITTANY

Known as sensitive souls who are very clever and attentive.

COCKER SPANIEL

Thanks to a certain fictional female dog, the cocker spaniel has a lot to live up to.

NOVA SCOTIA DUCK TOLLING RETRIEVER

If you’re looking for a dog that loves to play fetch, then look no further than this smarty-pants.

RELATED: 7 REASONS IT’S ACTUALLY BETTER TO LET YOUR DOG SLEEP IN YOUR BED

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There is no way of knowing if a mushroom is toxic or not. Dorman advises pet owners to get rid of mushrooms on their property to avoid danger.

“[It’s] always best to cut them, bag them, and throw them away. And then wash your hands yourself so you don’t get exposed,” he said.

He also said that should your pet eat a mushroom, treat it as a medical emergency and take them straight to a vet.

Nicole Kincaid, who works with Joyner at a nonprofit that helps foster dogs, described her fellow pet lover as a “wonderful person and wonderful dog owner.” Before the recent disaster, Joyner had a total of six dogs.

“She didn’t know they [the mushrooms] were there, they were under the mulch. It’s just scary to know how close it was to home and how it can happen to any dog,” said Kincaid. “That’s what we’re really hoping, that we can educate people.”

Despite the horrific tragedy, Joyner continues her mission of helping dogs in need and has recently taken in a new foster.

In a touching tribute to her late dogs, she wrote, “Most know that I lost two of my pack members recently, but foster needs never go away.” Joyner, as attentive as ever to the needs of her canine friends, added that her new foster dog “has an issue with his spine. He’s 8 weeks old and is going to a specialist this week to see what we can do for him.”

RELATED: 11 origins of dog breed names:

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Origins of dog breed names
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Origins of dog breed names

Basset Hound: “Little Low Dog”

These stout, low-slung dogs are of French origin. They were used for hunting—especially badgers and rabbits—in France since medieval times. The name, which goes back to the early 1600s, was a direct reference to the dog’s low-slung appearance: bas means “low” in French, and the et suffix is simply a diminutive, so basset basically means “little low dog.”

Rottweiler: German Guard Dog 

Ancient Romans traveled throughout Europe with large, powerful cattle-herding dogs. Centuries later, during the Middle Ages, butchers in the city of Rottweil (in what is now southern Germany) used descendants of those dogs as guard dogs, and they became known as Rottweiler Metzgerhunds—or “Rottweil butcher dogs.” That was later shortened to just “rottweiler.” Don't miss these astounding secrets all dogs know about their owners.

Husky: “Eskimo Dog”

“Husky” is a general name for several types of Arctic-based sled dogs, although there are a few recognized breeds that use the name, including the Siberian Husky and Greenland Husky. The term “husky” originated in the mid-1800s as a derivation of “hoskey dog,” or “esky dog”: both as variations of “Eskimo dog.” (Eskimo people are more properly known today as Inuit.)

Dalmatian: First “Spotted” in Dalmatia

The famously spotted Dalmatian was named in the early 1800s, after the region where it was believed to have been first spotted, er, bred: Dalmatia, on the Adriatic Sea coast of Croatia.

Cairn Terrier: “Earth Dog”

These small terriers originate in the Scottish Highlands, where they were bred to hunt small pests, such as rats and mice. A common feature in the Highlands: cairns—large man-made stone piles, which were used as landmarks and memorials. These tough little terriers were known for their ability to rouse prey from those cairns, hence their name. “Terrier” comes from the old French chien terrier, literally “earth dog.” Never heard of the cairn terrier? You’ve almost certainly seen one: A cairn terrier named Terry played a little doggie named Toto in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz.

Weimaraner: Royalty from Weimar, Germany

The swift, long-legged Weimaraner was bred for hunting—by royalty and royalty only—in the early 1800s. They were named for one of their early enthusiasts, the Grand Duke Karl August of Weimar. (Today, Weimar is a state in central Germany.) Make sure you know these sure signs that a dog trusts you.

Chow Chow: “Puffy Lion Dog”

The Chinese call this large, fuzzy, black-tongued dog songshi quan, or “puffy-lion dog.” The name “chow chow” is a nonsense word, a pidgin English term that was once applied to all knick-knacks and goods from china, probably because the Chinese names were too difficult for English-speaking people to pronounce. So when the dogs were first introduced to Great Britain in the 1880s—they were called “chow chow,” too … and the name stuck.

Schnauzer: Named for its Snout

The German schnauzer is known for its distinctively long, squarish snout—and that’s where they got their name: the German word for “snout” is Schnauze. You'll want to follow these tips to becoming a dog's favorite human.

Beagle: Howls on Hunts

The name “beagle” first entered the English language
 in the late 1400s. According to etymologists (and the American Kennel club) it came from the old French word beeguele, or begueule—meaning “wide open throat,” or “gaping throat,” probably because of the beagle’s tendency to howl at its prey while on a hunt.

Whippet: Great Speed

Whippets are descended from the English greyhound and, in fact, look like small greyhounds. Their name goes back 
to the early 1600s and is believed to come from the verb whip, referring to the whippet’s great speed. They’re also known as “snap dogs,” after the quick manner in which their jaws “snap up” prey. Check out more surprising superpowers that all dogs have.

Shih Tzu: “Little Lion”

Shih tzu is derived from the Chinese name for these dogs, which translates to “little lion.” These tiny long-haired dogs weren’t actually thought to resemble lions, but they did resemble lions as they were depicted in ancient Chinese painting and sculpture. (And who doesn’t like saying “shih tzu”?) Follow this guide to picking the best dog breed for you.

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