These women had their wedding at the Walmart where they work

Target may be a popular backdrop for wedding photos, but one Pennsylvania Walmart went a step further by hosting an actual wedding in its in-store garden center on March 17.

As the York Daily Record reports, the unconventional location seemed like the perfect choice for newlyweds Leida Torres and Chrissy Slonaker Torres. The couple met while working at the chain’s West Manchester Township, Pa., location, and tying the knot there not only honored their romantic history, it also ensured that several co-workers could be present without having to get a shift covered.

“We both have a lot of really close friends that we call family in our Walmart store,” said Slonaker Torres, who first met Leida in September 2015, said. “We discussed it with the store manager and the home office so that everybody in our store — everybody that we share our lives with — can be a part of the wedding.

Photo Credit: Facebook/Chrissy Sloanker Torres

“Everyone was so thrilled,” she continued. “They supported us 100 percent on it. They felt blessed that we chose to do it at the store just to have our special day with them.”

“I just told her, ‘Let’s do it,’” Leida added. “Our Walmart family has been so supportive. Why not?”

The couple’s co-workers helped them add a few special touches for the big day, including a tent decorated with red and white flowers and patio furniture for the approximately 100 guests in attendance.

That number includes many Walmart customers, who stopped to take in the ceremony.

“There were some customers that were going around saying ‘ooooh’ and ‘ahhh,’ and that was so sweet,” Slonaker Torres told the paper. “You could hear it in the background. I didn’t hear anything negative.”

Photos of the wedding have surfaced online, prompting some mixed reactions.

“[They were saying] we can’t afford a wedding [and] that we’re rednecks,” Slonaker Torres said, “but people that we know personally, and the customers that know us, they were resharing it and they were turning it into a positive thing.”

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11 ways Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's wedding will make history
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11 ways Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's wedding will make history

Meghan Markle is an American

Meghan Markle is the first American to be officially engaged to a British royal. A few other firsts this bride-to-be checks off: she's a woman of color, divorced, a well-known actor, and was raised Catholic. Markle was just recently baptized and confirmed in the Church of England. After her wedding to Prince Harry, she will have to go through the process of becoming a citizen of the U.K. Don't miss these royal wedding etiquette rules every member of the family must follow.

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The date

The day that Meghan Markle and Prince Harry will exchange vows is May 19th, 2018, which breaks a couple royal traditions. To start, the wedding is on a Saturday. In the past, royal weddings have typically been held on a weekday. Queen Elizabeth II got married on a Thursday, Prince Charles and Princess Diana on a Wednesday, and Prince William and Kate on a Friday. Also, the wedding will be held on the same day as Britain’s historic soccer cup competition, the Emirates FA Final Cup. Prince William is the president of the Football Association and usually makes an appearance at the Final Cup. But this year, we guess he has other events to attend!

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The cake

This is just a rumor, but there has been talk that the royal couple's wedding cake will be banana. Multi-tiered fruitcake has typically been the wedding cake choice of royal couples before them. Formal royal chef Darren McGrady said that Harry has always loved anything made with bananas, so it could be the chosen dessert at their wedding. Check out these other weird eating habits of the royal family.

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It's not a holiday

When Prince Harry and Markle announced their engagement, the British government told the public that there "isn't a precedent in this area" for a bank holiday to be declared for the royal wedding. The date, however, falls on a Saturday, so it’s likely that crowds will still be able to gather to celebrate the royal nuptials.

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It won't be as grand as previous royal weddings

Yes, in comparison to your average wedding, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding will be extremely grand. But in comparison to other royal weddings, it’s going to be much more low-key. Since Prince Harry is fifth in line to the throne, there’s less pressure for him to have a super traditional wedding. It’s going to be held in St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle just outside of London, which is a little quainter than Westminster Abbey where Prince William and Kate wed. Don't miss these secrets about Windsor Castle you never knew.

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There won't be a famous balcony kiss

Many recently married royal couples have kissed on the balcony of Buckingham Palace. However, since their ceremony is taking place at St. George’s Chapel, they likely won’t be making the hour-long trip back to London and Buckingham Palace to capture this classic royal moment.

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There will be no procession through London

You probably guessed that this isn’t going to happen either. Since the couple likely won’t be coming back to London after the ceremony, there won't be a London procession for the public to congratulate them—however, Kensington Palace announced there will be a procession through Windsor directly following the ceremony at 1 p.m. local time. Find out the special flower that must be included in every royal wedding bouquet.

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They invited the public to their wedding

Prince Harry and Markle want the public to feel as though they are a part of the celebration as much as possible—so they plan to invite 2,640 members of the public to watch them arrive and depart from St. George’s Chapel. Those lucky enough to be chosen to attend the royal wedding will be allowed onto the grounds of the castle for the nuptials.

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There won't be as many dignitaries in attendance

Prince Harry and Markle want the public to feel as though they are a part of the celebration as much as possible—so they plan to invite 2,640 members of the public to watch them arrive and depart from St. George’s Chapel. Those lucky enough to be chosen to attend the royal wedding will be allowed onto the grounds of the castle for the nuptials.

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There will be many more celebs in attendance

Prince Harry and Markle want the public to feel as though they are a part of the celebration as much as possible—so they plan to invite 2,640 members of the public to watch them arrive and depart from St. George’s Chapel. Those lucky enough to be chosen to attend the royal wedding will be allowed onto the grounds of the castle for the nuptials.

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Meghan Markle's father may not escort her down the aisle

Meghan Markle is certainly not afraid to do her wedding her own way. Markle reportedly wants her mother, Doria Ragland, to walk her down the aisle. While this isn’t that much of a surprise given Markle's close relationship with her mother—and many brides have chosen to forgo the classic tradition of having their father walk them down the aisle—for a royal wedding, it’s definitely something new.

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