Chris Evert on her iconic tennis bracelet moment and her favorite workouts off the court

Every tennis fan knows the name Chris Evert. The 18 time Grand Slam winner started turning heads in the tennis world when she was just a teenager, and she continues to be a major part of the international sports community.

We sat down with Evert this month at the BNP Paribas Open in sunny Indian Wells, California, and we caught up with her on everything from her favorite ways to workout off the court to why she turns to Osteo Bi-Flex when it comes to her joint health and what advice she has for young athletes. Read the entire interview below!

AOL: There are so many trendy diets and supplements out on the market right now from collagen pills to turmeric lattes. Why do you turn to and trust Osteo Bi-Flex when it comes to taking care of your joints?

CE: Well [Osteo Bi Flex] has been around for 20 years, that's the thing. It’s been proven, it’s been tested. A lot of former athletes have used it, and, you know, everybody’s living longer, it’s just amazing. At 50 you’ve lived half of your life now -- 20 years ago you were in your old age. I do believe that if you can get a healthy edge once in a while with products that are pure and that have been tested, I think that's a really good idea. I mean it happens to everybody -- you wake up one morning, and you realize "oh my god." Whether it's the over use of the body or you’re getting older. everybody needs a little help.

When you aren't playing tennis, what are some of your favorite ways to stay active?

I do hot yoga. I do that like twice a week. And not just yoga, hot yoga, because i like to sweat. And then I have a tennis academy, so I hit, I play with a lot of the kids and I do that every morning. I feel like I need to get 3 things: I feel at my age I need to get cardio, I need to get that flexibility, which I get from yoga, and then I need to get strengthening from a CrossFit class or I'll do weights twice a week. I try to do tennis four times a week, weights twice a weeks and yoga twice a week. I'm lucky because I have the time, because I work periodically. I'll go to tournaments and do some commentating, but I mean I'm fortunate that I don’t have to work full time and I'm squeezed for time to work out. I feel lucky that I have that luxury.

What is your favorite part of commentating and broadcasting?

My favorite part about broadcasting is, I think, just trying to get across or explain exactly the intangibles of what is happening on the court, you know, mentally in the players’ minds -- how they’re feeling pressure-wise, how they’re feeling emotionally, because I’ve been there. I think that I'm better at the mental and the emotional aspect of explaining what a player is going through, because I think most tennis fans are pretty educated and they know, "well duh, she’s missing a lot of forehands," so that sort of comes in second to what I'm trying get across. 

21 PHOTOS
Chris Evert through the years
See Gallery
Chris Evert through the years
1st July 1972: Chris Evert of the USA holds up the women's singles trophy after winning at the Queen's Club. (Photo by Frank Tewkesbury/Evening Standard/Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY - SEPTEMBER 1977: Tennis player Chris Evert of the USA hits a backhand return against Wendy Turnbull during the women finals of the 1977 U.S. Open tennis tournament at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, September 1977. Evert defeated Turnbull 7-6, 6-2. (Photo by Focus On Sport/Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY - AUGUST 1980: Tennis player Chris Evert Lloyd of the USA plays during the early rounds of the 1980 U.S. Open tennis tournament at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, September 1980. (Photo by Focus On Sport/Getty Images)
Christine Marie Evert Lloyd, born 1954, playing in the ladies singles semi-final at Wimbledon in 1981 which she went on to win. She won three Wimbledon tennis titles and the American title six times between 1971 and 1982. (Photo by � Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
NEW YORK - CIRCA 1981: Chris Evert-Lloyd returns a shot during the Women's 1981 US Open Tennis Championships circa 1981 at the USTA Tennis Center in the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
The tennis champion Chris Evert Lloyd tournament Roland Garros, Paris, France, 1983. (Photo by Philippe Le Tellier / Getty Images)
Chris Evert from USA during the 1983 Roland Garros French Open. (Photo by Jean-Yves Ruszniewski/TempSport/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY - AUGUST 29: Athletes Chris Evert and Andy Mills attend 11th Annual Women's Tennis Association Awards Banquet on August 29, 1988 at the Plaza Hotel in New York City, New York. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 18: Chris Evert (Photo by The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY - OCTOBER 4: Athlete Chris Evert attends Sudafed Women's Sports Awards Dinner on October 4, 1993 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)
Athletes Chris Evert and Andy Mills attend 12th Annual Women's Tennis Association Awards Banquet on August 28, 1989 at the Plaza Hotel in New York City, New York. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)
Chris Evert (Photo by L. Cohen/WireImage)
DELRAY BEACH, FL - NOVEMBER 07: Gavin Rossdale participate in the Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity Tennis Classic at Delray Beach Tennis Center on November 7, 2009 in Delray Beach, Florida. (Photo by Larry Marano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - AUGUST 26: Tennis player Chris Evert attends the premiere of ESPN Films' documentary 'Unmatched' at Tribeca Cinemas on August 26, 2010 in New York City. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)
DELRAY BEACH, FL - NOVEMBER 12: Chris Evert attends the Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity Tennis Classic at Delray Beach Tennis Center on November 12, 2011 in Delray Beach, Florida. (Photo by Larry Marano/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 17: Billie Jean King (L) and Christine 'Chris' Evert speak onstage at the 33rd annual Salute To Women In Sports Gala at Cipriani Wall Street on October 17, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
SINGAPORE - OCTOBER 26: Chris Evert is interviewed before the final during day seven of the BNP Paribas WTA Finals tennis at the Singapore Sports Hub on October 26, 2014 in Singapore. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 12: Former professional tennis player Chris Evert hosts a private tennis clinic for Starwood Preferred Guest during the 2015 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 12, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images for SPG)
SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE - OCTOBER 29: WTA Legend Ambassador Chris Evert of the United States attends a press conference during day 7 of the BNP Paribas WTA Finals Singapore at Singapore Sports Hub on October 29, 2016 in Singapore. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)
BOCA RATON, FL - NOVEMBER 03: Chris Evert attends the 2017 Chris Evert/Raymond James Pro-Celebrity Tennis Classic at Boca Raton Resort & Club on November 3, 2017 in Boca Raton, Florida. (Photo by Johnny Louis/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 27: Chris Evert attends the Annual Legends lunch at the Grand Hyatt hotel on day 13 of the 2018 Australian Open on January 27, 2018 in Melbourne, Australia. Tennis legends from around the world joined Mal Anderson and his family at the lunch to celebrate the achievements of the Australian great and which is held every year on the Saturday of the Women's final. (Photo by James D. Morgan/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

This tournament has some of the best tennis players in the world competing. Who are some of your favorite players to watch?

Roger Federer is my favorite player to watch; I think he’s everybody's favorite. It's gonna be a sad day when he retires. I love watching him and I'm in awe I think of Serena [Willlam's] power when I watch her -- how she can just clock the ball with so much power and pace. And that serve is so explosive. She’s such an explosive player — I wasn’t, so that's why I can appreciate that.

Looking back at your own professional career, does one particular moment or win stand out as a clear favorite of yours?

I think when I was 15 and I beat Margaret Court. She was the number one player in the world. It was a tournament in Charlotte, North Carolina, and she had just won the Grand Slam, meaning she just won four in a row, and she was the number one player in the world. I beat her 7-6, 7-6, and that I think was the start of my career. And I was by myself, I was alone -- I didn’t have any parents with me. I had my best friend with me, and that was the first tournament that my parents let me go alone, so I was really happy about that.

You started playing tennis when you were 5 years old, what advice would you give to young athletes who are trying to pursue a professional sports career and are really just starting out?

It's a commitment. You have to give up things. It's a commitment and you have to be disciplined. You have to be disciplined enough to get your sleep and eat the right foods and to get the right team around you and put in your practice hours. And to be really good at anything now, you have to commit and you have to follow through and not cut corners. You have to put in the hours and practice, and hopefully enjoy it at the same time or else it's tedious.

And I have to ask, you are legendary for giving diamond tennis bracelets their name; do you still wear your tennis bracelet whenever you play?

No, I don't! I never got one free tennis bracelet, by the way, and I feel like I kind of had something to do with it! Nobody ever gave me a free tennis bracelet -- no jewelry company or anything. I feel like they made a lot of money off that. *Laughs* I just dropped my bracelet on center court at the US Open and that's when they called it the tennis bracelet.

An iconic moment to say the least. 

“Osteo Bi-Flex encourages joint comfort, flexibility and movement and Chrissie Evert has partnered with the brand because as a former athlete she knows first-hand how important it is to keep moving and stay active in order to continue doing what she loves.” Learn more about Chris Evert's partnership here

These are the richest tennis players

30 PHOTOS
The world's wealthiest tennis players
See Gallery
The world's wealthiest tennis players

30. Goran Ivanisevic — $19,878,007

Nationality: Croatian

Grand Slam titles: 1 (Wimbledon)

Overall titles: 22 

Photo credit: Getty

29. Stefan Edberg — $20,630,941

Nationality: Swedish

Grand Slam titles: 6 (2 Australian, 2 Wimbledon, 2 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 41 

Photo credit: Getty

28. Andy Roddick — $20,640,030

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 1 (U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 32 

Photo credit: Getty

27. Lleyton Hewitt — $20,787,586

Nationality: Australian

Grand Slam titles: 2 (1 Wimbledon, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 30 

Photo credit: Getty

26. Justine Henin — $20,863,335

Nationality: Belgian

Grand Slam titles: 7 (1 Australian Open, 4 French Open, 2 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 43 

Photo credit: Getty

25. Ivan Lendl — $21,262,417

Nationality: Czech and American

Grand Slam titles: 8 (2 Australian Open, 3 French Open, 3 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 94 

Photo credit: Getty

24. Martina Navratilova — $21,626,089

Nationality: Czech and American

Grand Slam titles: 18 (9 Wimbledon, 4 U.S. Open, 3 Australian Open, 2 French Open)

Overall titles: 167 

Photo credit: Getty

23. Steffi Graf — $21,895,277

Nationality: German

Grand Slam titles: 22 (7 Wimbledon, 6 French Open, 5 U.S. Open, 4 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 107 

Photo credit: Getty 

22. Lindsay Davenport — $22,166,338

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 3 (1 Australian, 1 Wimbledon, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 55 

Photo credit: Reuters 

21. Petra Kvitová — $23,250,002

Nationality: Czech

Grand Slam titles: 2 (2 Wimbledon)

Overall titles: 20 

Photo credit: Getty

20. Svetlana Kuznetsova — $23,812,475

Nationality: Russian

Grand Slam titles: 2 (1 French Open, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 17 

Photo credit: Getty

19. Yevgeny Kafelnikov — $23,883,797

Nationality: Russian

Grand Slam titles: 2 (1 Australian, 1 French Open)

Overall titles: 26

Photo credit: Getty

18. Martina Hingis — $23,973,084

Nationality: Swiss

Grand Slam titles: 5 (3 Australian Open, 1 Wimbledon, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 43 

Photo credit: Getty

17. Caroline Wozniacki — $24,255,896

Nationality: Danish

Grand Slam titles: 0

Overall titles: 25 

Photo credit: Getty

16. Kim Clijsters — $24,442,340

Nationality: Belgian

Grand Slam titles: 4 (3 U.S. Open, 1 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 41

Photo credit: Reuters

15. Boris Becker — $25,080,956

Nationality: German

Grand Slam titles: 6 (3 Wimbledon, 2 Australian, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 49 

Photo credit: Reuters 

14. Agnieszka Radwańska — $26,600,822

Nationality: Polish

Grand Slam titles: 0

Overall titles: 20 

Photo credit: Reuters 

13. Tomas Berdych — $28,085,248

Nationality: Czech

Grand Slam titles: 0

Overall titles: 13 

Photo credit: Reuters 

12. Victoria Azarenka — $28,431,189

Nationality: Belarusian

Grand Slam titles: 2 (2 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 20 

Photo credit: Getty

11. Stan Wawrinka — $30,623,544

Nationality: Swiss

Grand Slam titles: 3 (1 Australian Open, 1 French Open, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 16  

Photo credit: Getty

10. David Ferrer — $30,690,257

Nationality: Spanish

Grand Slam titles: 0

Overall titles: 27 

Photo credit: Getty

9. Andre Agassi — $31,152,975

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 8 (4 Australian Open, 2 U.S. Open, 1 Wimbledon, 1 French Open)

Overall titles: 60 

Photo credit: Reuters

8. Maria Sharapova — $36,585,213

Nationality: Russian

Grand Slam titles: 5 (2 French Open, 1 Wimbledon, 1 U.S. Open, 1 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 35 

Photo credit: Reuters 

7. Venus Williams — $37,928,590

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 7 (5 Wimbledon, 2 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 49 

Photo credit: Reuters 

6. Pete Sampras — $43,280,489

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 14 (7 Wimbledon, 5 U.S. Open, 2 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 64 

Photo credit: Reuters 

5. Andy Murray — $60,807,644

Nationality: Scottish

Grand Slam titles: 3 (2 Wimbledon, 1 U.S. Open)

Overall titles: 45 

Photo credit: Reuters 

4. Serena Williams — $84,463,131

Nationality: American

Grand Slam titles: 23 (7 Wimbledon, 7 Australian, 6 U.S. Open, 3 French Open)

Overall titles: 72 

Photo credit: Reuters 

3. Rafael Nadal — $86,289,532

Nationality: Spanish

Grand Slam titles: 14 (9 French Open, 2 Wimbledon, 2 U.S. Open, 1 Australian Open)

Overall titles: 73 

Photo credit: Reuters 

2. Roger Federer — $107,780,560

Nationality: Swiss

Grand Slam titles: 19 (8 Wimbledon, 5 U.S. Open, 5 Australian Open, 1 French Open)

Overall titles: 93 

Photo credit: Reuters 

1. Novak Djokovic — $109,805,403

Nationality: Serbian

Grand Slam titles: 12 (6 Australian Open, 3 Wimbledon, 2 U.S. Open, 1 French Open)

Overall titles: 68 

Photo credit: Reuters

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for the Best Bites by AOL newsletter to get the most delicious recipes and hottest food trends delivered straight to your inbox every day.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.