This ice cream is being recalled due to listeria risks. Check to see if your favorite brand is affected.

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, popular ice cream bars are being recalled from numerous stores around the country. Kroger, Aldi, Winn-Dixie, BJ's, ShopRite, Stop N Shop, and even the Dollar Tree, are all sending back ice cream that may cause listeria.

The recalled ice cream came from Fieldbrook Foods Corporation, according to the FDA. The specific flavors that are being recalled are their boxes of orange cream bars, chocolate-coated vanilla bars, raspberry cream bars, and other variety packs of ice cream. Fieldbrook Foods Corporation products are sold at Kroger brand stores (Ralphs, Dillon, Smiths, Fred Meyer, Food 4 Less, Smiths), World's Fair (Save-A-Lot), Acme (Lucerne), and Southern Home (Bi Lo, Harveys). The FDA released a full list of stores that are part of the ice cream recall.

Nearly 29,000 cases have been pulled since the recall started on Jan. 5, and no illnesses have been reported yet. However, if you have purchased any of these ice cream products so far this month, you should probably check your box. The recalled products have a production date of Jan. 1, 2017 to Dec. 31, 2017, and a "best by" date of Jan. 1, 2018 to Dec. 31, 2018. If you have a box with these dates, you can return it to the store for a refund.

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Chocolate

Chocolate, for instance, is always good, even after it’s covered by that sort of white look. The white shading is called “blooming,” which is when the fat rises to the surface of the chocolate. It will affect the flavor, but it’s still totally safe to eat.

Photo: Aimee Herring

Chips

Chips are so high in salt that it helps them preserve well.

Photo: Chris Clor via Getty Images

Eggs

When it comes to eggs, the best way to know if they are fresh is by putting them in a container with cold water. If they sink, they are good to eat. If they float to the surface, they're no longer fresh.

Photo: Oliver Strewe via Getty Images

Canned Foods

Canned foods last much longer than their expiration date, just make sure keep them in cool and dark areas. 

Photo: Carolyn Hebbard via Getty Images

Dry Pasta

Dry pasta will also be fine if you’re storing it airtight.

Photo: Glow Cuisine via Getty Images

Fruits and Veggies

When it comes to fruit and veggies, trust your instincts. If it looks and smell good, you should be fine to consume it.

Photo: Dynamic Graphics Group via Getty Images

Cheese

While you should certainly get rid of cheese when it's moldy, hard cheeses, like cheddar and parmesan, tend to last longer.

Photo: Junior Gonzalez via Getty Images

Alcohol

It takes years for alcohol to go bad, but we are sure you already think twice before throwing that away.

Photo: yangwenshuang via Getty Images

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Although only a few of the ice cream bar samples were proven to have listeria, the recall was made just to be safe. According to the Center for Disease Control, listeria is an infection caused by a germ contaminated in food. It primarily affects pregnant women, newborns, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. It could take one to four weeks for symptoms of listeria to show (typically starts with a fever and diarrhea, or other flu-like symptoms), and sometimes could take up to 70 days before symptoms arise.

That being said, if you have ice cream bars from this particular food corporation in your freezer, the best decision would be to throw it away or return it to the store for a refund.

Can't have your ice cream anymore? Don't worry, it's super simple to make a batch from scratch. Learn how to make ice cream without an ice cream maker, here.

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