Just what does 'Auld Lang Syne' mean anyway?

When Mariah Carey gets her second shot at the Ball Drop this year, assuming her microphone works, you may hear the song Auld Lang Syne.

But what the heck does that mean anyhow?

Well, according to Time, Auld Lang Syne is a Scottish folk song oft used to mark the end of something, like the end of a very bizarre 2017.

The Scottish government asserts Auld Lang Syne means "for old times' sake."

RELATED: Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve performance

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Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve performance
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Mariah Carey's New Year's Eve performance
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Mariah Carey performs during a concert in Times Square on New Year's Eve in New York, U.S. December 31, 2016. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
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Now, in case you're old enough to remember, a Canadian bandleader by the name of Guy Lombardo helped make the song a New Year's Eve tradition by playing the song on a special night starting in 1929.

Despite the critics, he told Life Magazine "You can call it corny-I don't care."

And to this day, as cheesy as it may sound we're still taking a cup of kindness for auld lang syne.

Which may be one of the only constants we'll have leading into 2018. That and knowing something newsworthy will probably happen with Miss Carey.

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