Hidden meanings behind your favorite Christmas decorations

You decorate the tree every holiday season because that's just what everyone does. But there are hidden meanings behind some of your favorite Christmas decorations. Take it from the folks at Good Housekeeping and The Spruce. Let's start with the iconic Christmas tree.

It's said the tradition began because, in many countries, evergreens are believed to ward off evil spirits and illness, according to history.

Wreaths aren't all about making a statement on your front door. They're a circular symbol of love and rebirth, according to The Spruce. However, Christians think wreaths represent thorns worn by Jesus, and the tiny red berries are his blood, according to The New York Times.

RELATED: Rockefeller Center Christmas tree 2017

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Rockefeller Center Christmas tree 2017
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Rockefeller Center Christmas tree 2017
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: A view of Rockefeller Plaza during the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at Rockefeller Center on November 29, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
The Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center is pictured following the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is seen in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 28, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
The Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center is reflected in an ornament following the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
The Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center is pictured during the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
The Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center is pictured following the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
An NYPD officer takes a photo of the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center following the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A person works in the office during the Christmas tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
People look at the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center during the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
The Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center is pictured following the lighting ceremony in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: A view of the Rockefeller Plaza during the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at Rockefeller Center on November 29, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: A view of the Rockefeller Plaza during the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at Rockefeller Center on November 29, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: A view of the Christmas Tree at the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at Rockefeller Center on November 29, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/WireImage)
A view of the Rockefeller Plaza during the 85th Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at Rockefeller Center on November 29, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
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At the start, berries on a holly bush were white, until they were stained red by the blood of Christ, according to legend, and the experts at How Stuff Works.

The candle is a mirror of starlight. The mirror helps reflect our thanks for the star of Bethlehem from the Gospel of Matthew, according to The Spruce.

Stockings are now stuffed with gifts after St. Nicolas heard of the tough time a widowed father was going through long ago, so he slid down the chimney and filled his daughter's stockings with gold coins. That's according to Smithsonian.

We give people gifts during the holiday season because the three wise men did to honor the birth of Jesus, according to The Spruce.

However, gone are the days of bringing just one gift!

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