This is what happens to your body when you binge on Thanksgiving

It’s no exaggeration that you ate more than your stomach wants to hold. When you keep eating once your stomach is full, it will keep expanding to make room for more food—and that’s when you get uncomfortably full.

“If it’s stretching larger than its normal size, it can put pressure on your other organs,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Jenna Braddock, MSH, RD, CSSD, LDN, founder of MakeHealthyEasy.com.

RELATED: Best and worst Thanksgiving foods for you:

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The best and worst Thanksgiving foods for your health
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The best and worst Thanksgiving foods for your health

BEST: White turkey meat

Nutrition (per 3 oz. serving): 115 calories and 7 grams of fat

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WORST: Dark turkey meat

Nutrition (per 3 oz. serving): 160 calories and 11 grams of fat

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BEST: Green bean casserole

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 161 calories, 9 g fat 

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WORST: Sweet potato casserole

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 285 calories, 5 g fat 

BEST: Dinner roll with dollop of butter

Nutrition (1 roll): 140 calories and 4.5 g fat

WORST: Stuffing

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 371 calories and 19 g of fat 

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BEST: Gravy

Nutrition (per 1/4 cup serving): 30 calories and 1.5 g fat

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WORST: Cranberry jelly

Nutrition (per 1/4 cup serving): 110 calories and 0 g fat

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BEST: Pumpkin pie

Nutrition (per slice -- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie): 316 calories and 14 g of fat

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WORST: Apple pie

Nutrition (per slice -- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie): 411 calories and 19 g of fat

BEST: Brussel sprouts 

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 56 calories and 4 g protein

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WORST: Mashed potatoes with whole milk and margarine

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 237 calories and 9 g of fat

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BEST: Cooked spinach

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 41 calories and 5 g of protein

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WORST: Corn bread

Nutrition (1 piece -- around 60 oz.): 198 calories and 9 g of fat

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BEST: Corn with a pat of butter

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 95 calories and 5 g of fiber

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WORST: Mac and cheese

Nutrition (per 1 cup of serving): 310 calories and 9 g of fat

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By the time you’ve digested your feast, though, your stomach size will go back to normal. At least it usually does—crazily enough, some people’s stomachs stay stretched out.

One big meal (or even one holiday season) of unhealthy foods shouldn’t do any permanent damage, but if you’re constantly overeating, your stomach might learn not to bounce back, says registered dietitian nutritionist Caroline Passerrello, MS, RDN, LDN, spokesperson for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

That means the next time you eat, you’ll need to eat more to feel full, and the cycle of overeating will continue. Don’t miss these 12 reasons your stomach is bloated and when to worry.

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