Green beans are actually a fruit -- and our minds are blown

If you are planning on serving green bean casserole at your Thanksgiving dinner as your vegetable, you might need to rethink your plans. But don’t blame us, blame the Supreme Court.

According to the Edible Academy at the New York Botanical garden, green beans are actually considered “dry fruit" -- unless they come from cans. 

Toby Adams, the director of the Edible Academy, explained, "Fruits are structures that contain seeds, and a green bean is, basically, a pod that has seeds inside of it." However, while the food is technically a fruit—as well as a legume—it’s still considered a vegetable by many.  

Related: Follow these tips for the perfect turkey

12 PHOTOS
Top 10 Butterball turkey tips for Thanksgiving
See Gallery
Top 10 Butterball turkey tips for Thanksgiving
10. Butterball recommends the Open Pan Roasting Method to consistently create a tender, juicy and golden
brown turkey. Use a shallow pan about 2 to 2 1/2 inches deep, and always use a flat rack so the turkey cooks
evenly.
9. Use the stuffing calculator on Butterball.com to figure out the right amount to make everyone at your table
happy.
8. Prepare stuffing just before placing in the turkey, using only cooked ingredients. Loosely stuff neck and body
cavities of completely thawed turkey and do not tightly pack stuffing into turkey.
7. Before roasting, turn the turkey’s wings back to hold the neck skin in place. This levels the turkey in the
roasting pan to encourage even cooking, and with the wings out of the way, makes carving easier.

6. Remember home food safety tips when handling turkey

  • Wash hands often
  • Keep raw turkey and ready-to-eat foods separated
  • Cook to proper temperature (see tip 13)
  • Refrigerate cooked turkey promptly to reduce temperature to below 40 degrees Fahrenheit
5. What size bird to buy? Allow 1 1/2 pounds of turkey per person for generous servings and leftovers.
4. Quick and easy. Butterball offers fully cooked turkeys. Already seasoned and roasted, just throw them in a
shallow pan and warm in the oven according to package instructions for a no-mess, no-fuss way to delight
3. No time to thaw? Try thawing more quickly by submerging the turkey in cold water. Leave the bird in the
wrapper, place it in a tub or sink of cold water and allow 30 minutes of thaw time for every pound of turkey.
2. Butterball recommends refrigerator thawing. For every four pounds of turkey, allow at least one day of
thawing in the refrigerator.
1. Fresh or frozen turkey? Fresh turkeys need no thawing and are ready to cook. Frozen turkeys can be purchased
weeks in advance, but require several days of thawing before roasting. Fresh Butterball turkeys are all natural and
contain no additional ingredients. Frozen Butterball turkeys are deep basted to be extra tender and juicy.
You can find more life-saving tips from Butterball here
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

That’s because the Supreme Court got involved in a case about tomatoes in 1893, after importers wanted it officially classified as fruit so they could avoid the 10 percent import tax imposed on vegetables. The court essentially ruled that tomatoes and beans, including green beans, are used in dinner recipes and therefore constitute a vegetable, while fruits are typically used as a dessert.

So, until there is a good green bean pie for dessert, the pod and seed dry fruit will still be called a vegetable. But, we're not sure that sounds too tasty. 

Related: Foods you may want to avoid

17 PHOTOS
The best and worst Thanksgiving foods for your health
See Gallery
The best and worst Thanksgiving foods for your health

BEST: White turkey meat

Nutrition (per 3 oz. serving): 115 calories and 7 grams of fat

(Getty)

WORST: Dark turkey meat

Nutrition (per 3 oz. serving): 160 calories and 11 grams of fat

(Getty)

BEST: Green bean casserole

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 161 calories, 9 g fat 

(Getty)

WORST: Sweet potato casserole

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 285 calories, 5 g fat 

BEST: Dinner roll with dollop of butter

Nutrition (1 roll): 140 calories and 4.5 g fat

WORST: Stuffing

Nutrition (per 3/4 cup serving): 371 calories and 19 g of fat 

(Getty)

BEST: Gravy

Nutrition (per 1/4 cup serving): 30 calories and 1.5 g fat

(Getty)

WORST: Cranberry jelly

Nutrition (per 1/4 cup serving): 110 calories and 0 g fat

(Getty)

BEST: Pumpkin pie

Nutrition (per slice -- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie): 316 calories and 14 g of fat

(Getty)

WORST: Apple pie

Nutrition (per slice -- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie): 411 calories and 19 g of fat

BEST: Brussel sprouts 

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 56 calories and 4 g protein

(Getty)

WORST: Mashed potatoes with whole milk and margarine

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 237 calories and 9 g of fat

(Getty)

BEST: Cooked spinach

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 41 calories and 5 g of protein

(Getty)

WORST: Corn bread

Nutrition (1 piece -- around 60 oz.): 198 calories and 9 g of fat

(Getty)

BEST: Corn with a pat of butter

Nutrition (per 1 cup serving): 95 calories and 5 g of fiber

(Getty)

WORST: Mac and cheese

Nutrition (per 1 cup of serving): 310 calories and 9 g of fat

(Getty)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for the Best Bites by AOL newsletter to get the most delicious recipes and hottest food trends delivered straight to your inbox every day.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.