Why you should never, ever keep eggs in this one part of the fridge

Here in the good old U.S. of A., storing your eggs in the fridge is about as American as apple pie and baseball. (By the way, have you ever wondered why Americans refrigerate eggs and Europeans don’t?) But depending on where you place them in the fridge, you could be harming your health, a storage expert reveals.

According to Vlatka Lake, a marketing manager at the storage company Space Station, you should never store these breakfast staples in the plastic egg rack that comes built-in—or as a separate insert with—fridges.

11 PHOTOS
Cost of eggs in 10 cities around the US
See Gallery
Cost of eggs in 10 cities around the US

Los Angeles, CA

Avg. cost per dozen: $3.90

New York, NY

Avg. cost per dozen: $3.57

New Orleans, LA

Avg. cost per dozen: $3.31

Houston, TX

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.97

Seattle, WA

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.93

Raleigh, NC

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.79

Orlando, FL

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.89

Albuquerque, NM

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.73

Indianapolis, IN

Avg. cost per dozen: $2.71

Sioux Falls, SD

Avg. cost per dozen: $1.77

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

“When it comes to eggs, there is a huge debate on where they should be kept, with some saying in the fridge and others saying on the counter,” she told The Sun. “The general consensus is to store eggs in the fridge, but not in the egg racks commonly found on the fridge door.”

Why this little-known rule? Placing the eggs in the door of the fridge could expose them to fluctuating temperatures as you open and close the door throughout the day, Lake said. That, in turn, causes them to rot faster. You’d be better off storing the eggs on a shelf in the fridge, where the temps will remain fairly constant. These foods, on the other hand, are better off on the counter or in the cupboard.

13 PHOTOS
The best and worst cheeses for you
See Gallery
The best and worst cheeses for you

WORST: Parmesan

The Italian cheese is filled with calories and sodium. While people tend to use it sparingly -- grating it on top of a pasta dish here and there -- an ounce of Parmesan contains 1/3 of your daily sodium allowance. 

(Getty)

BEST: Feta

The beloved salad topper has fewer calories than other cheeses, only 75 calories per ounce, so it’s a good choice for those trying to eat healthy. The Greek cheese is also rich in flavor, so a little goes a long way!

(Getty)

WORST: Blue Cheese

The spotted blue cheese has 8 grams of fat and 100 calories, per one-ounce serving -- making it one of the worst you can eat.

(Getty)

BEST: Cottage Cheese

The healthy cheese is a go-to for dieters everywhere. The neutral taste is also a plus, meaning you can top it with something sweet or savory. It’s rich in protein, which helps keep you full, and low in fat and calories. A 1/2 cup of low-fat cottage cheese contains only 81 calories and 1 gram of fat, with 14 grams of protein.

(Getty)

WORST: Cream Cheese

Out of all the soft, white cheeses on the market, cream cheese is the unhealthiest. The cheese most commonly used on bagels has almost 10 grams of fat and 99 calories per ounce.

(Getty)

BEST: Mozzarella

While mozzarella often gets a bad rap because of it's association with pizza, the cheese is a good source of protein. Mozzarella sticks (not the fried alternative) are a quick and easy snack for when you're on the go.

(Getty)

WORST: Gruyere 

The hard yellow cheese, named after the town of Gruyères in Switzerland, contains a whopping 117 calories and just over 9 grams of fat per ounce.

(Getty)

BEST: Swiss

Unlike Gruyere, you can reap a bunch major health benefits from a little amount of Swiss -- just two slices alone contain 44 percent of your daily calcium intake, and 15 grams of protein. 

(Getty)

WORST: Fontina

The Italian cow's milk cheese has a whopping 110 calories and almost 9 grams of fat per 1-ounce serving. The cheese is quite pungent in flavor. The Swedish and Danish versions are often found in US grocery stores, and can be distinguished from Aostan Fontina by their red wax rind.

(Getty)

BEST: Ricotta

The cheese most commonly used in Italian cuisine contains 14 grams of protein and 25 percent of your daily calcium needs in a half-cup serving. It’s also low in sodium and high in phosphorus, B vitamins, vitamin A, and zinc.

WORST: American

There's definitely something about American singles that probably gets you nostalgic about your childhood. However, it's not doing your health any favors -- it's made up of mostly processed ingredients, including food dyes that give it an unnatural yellow-orange color.

BEST: Cheddar

The light taste of cheddar makes for a lower-calorie, versatile cheese that goes well with many meals.

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

There you have it! Now that you’re in the loop on this dangerous storage mistake, you’ll want to pay attention to the eggs’ color, too. This is the difference between brown and white eggs and what an egg yolk’s color reveals about its nutrition.

[Source: The Sun]

Read Full Story

Sign up for the Best Bites by AOL newsletter to get the most delicious recipes and hottest food trends delivered straight to your inbox every day.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.