Nighttime and weekend surgeries may have higher risk of complications

If you’re about to go under the knife, maybe consider booking your appointment for earlier in the day.

Having a surgery in the late evening or early morning could put you at greater risk of complications, as if you weren’t already nervous enough about having surgery in the first place.

A study out of the University of Michigan suggests that risk jumps by more than half for operations between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m.

In all, researchers looked at nearly 16,000 brain surgery patients over more than seven years. They kept tabs on complications and when they occurred.

Complications were also much more likely if a surgery within that time period was an emergency and not pre-scheduled, as though you can save your emergencies for the daylight hours.

In addition, you likely want to avoid surgery on the weekend if possible, according to the Daily Mail.

Basically, whenever bank employees are working, that’s the best time for a surgeon to be working too.

RELATED: The incredible skills behind delicate facial reconstruction surgery

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The incredible skills behind delicate facial reconstruction surgery
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The incredible skills behind delicate facial reconstruction surgery
An employee works on the model of an eye reconstruction inside the Maxillofacial (Max Facs) Prosthetic Department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee works on the model of an eye reconstruction inside the Maxillofacial (Max Facs) Prosthetic Department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A model of an eye reconstruction sits on a bench inside the Maxillofacial (Max Facs) Prosthetic Department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Satyesh Parmar, consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, holds a plastic plate as he performs a facial reconstruction operation to move part of a patient's hip bone to their face inside a theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A patient lies on the operating table during his facial reconstruction operation inside theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Satyesh Parmar, consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, performs a facial reconstruction operation to move part of a patient's hip bone to their face inside a theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Surgeons, medial staff and observers gather around a patient during an operation inside theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Models of skeletal facial structures, produced by a 3D printing machine, sit on a bench inside the Maxillofacial (Max Facs) Prosthetic Department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Models of prosthetic noses sit on a bench inside the prosthetic department at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An anesthetist checks information displayed on electronic screens during an operation inside theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Members of the medical team perform a facial reconstruction operation to move part of a patient's hip bone to their face inside a theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. Health care repeatedly appears near the top in surveys of voters' concerns. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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