Science says you’ve been tying your shoelaces wrong your whole life

You've probably been tying your own shoes since kindergarten, but that doesn't mean you've been doing it right. There's a scientific reason you should rethink your usual bow.

Most people tie their shoes using the "bunny ears" technique. Do that, though, and you're basically asking for your laces to come loose. (If your favorite pair is lace-free, find out what your favorite shoes say about you.)

Scientists tested a couple types of knots for a study in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. When hooked up to a pendulum simulating someone walking for 15 minutes, the bunny ears knot came loose every time—and faster than a different knot.

In another part of the experiment with real people walking on a treadmill, it only took several minutes for the shoelaces to start becoming undone. And once the knot loosened up, it got totally untied within two strides.

Related: Cleaning hacks every person needs to know

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Lazy cleaning hacks

Make a habit of putting at least one thing away when you enter a different room in your house. 

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Spray an all-purpose cleaner every time you shower. This will prevent mildew build up and ensure you never have to an entire two hours to clean your showers.

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Opt for a shower gel or body wash instead of using a bar of soap to avoid extra shower scum. Bath & Body Works has a Marshmallow Pumpkin Latte variation perfect for this season. 

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Get rid of pet hair (and your own) by wiping all your hairy surfaces with a pair of slightly damp rubber gloves. 

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Has this ever happened to you? ::tragic::

Grab your iron and lift that stain right up. 

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To clean a dirty microwave take a simple sponge and throw it into a bowl with water, dish soap and vinegar. Then, place the damp sponge inside your microwave and heat for three minutes. Once that's done, the microwave will be full of condensation and much easier to clean. Be careful though, the sponge will be very hot so it's best to wear rubber gloves as you clean. 

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Clean your shower liner by throwing it in the wash with a few soiled towels. Add a half-cup of baking soda in with your normal amount of detergent. At the rinse cycle, dump in a half-cup of vinegar. Hang your shower liner to dry.

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Keep coal or baking soda in your fridge to absorb gross odors. 

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Line your George Foreman grill with aluminum foil before using it to avoid hours of scrubbing post-eating.  

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Eat straight out of takeout containers or a tortilla to avoid having dishes to wash. 

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Keep cleaning supply where you use it. 

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Avoid heavy-duty fridge cleaning by lining your fridge shelves with Press' N Seal

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"What was remarkable to us was how fast it happened," study co-author Oliver O'Reilly of the University of California at Berkeley told USA Today.

It might seem weird that shoelaces become untied when there's nothing pulling on the ends, but the researchers figured it out. The impact of your foot hitting the ground, the motion of your shoe in the air, and the force of the free ends of your lace swinging around all mess with that knot you were counting on. (Beyond loose laces, don't miss these 7 ways your sneakers can ruin your workout.)

The problem with the "bunny ears" is that it creates a "granny knot" in your laces, which is known not to be as sturdy as something called a "reef knot."

Luckily, the researchers found better way to tie your shoes. With a technique that turned into a stronger reef knot, the laces came apart half as many times as the bunny ears did. And don't worry, it doesn't require any fancy knot skills.

To make a strong knot, start as you normally would, crossing your right lace over the left, then pulling the left lace through the loop you created underneath. Now make a loop with both laces. Here's where it gets different. The classic bunny ears would bring one loop "behind the tree," and pull through the new loop closest to you. Don't do that! Instead, reverse it and bring it around the front before pulling it through.

Viola! No more tripping over loose laces. As a bonus, the bow will sit straight for once, so you'll look better, too. It's just a matter of reversing that one step.

In other mind-blowing news, learn the weird ways you've been playing Monopoly wrong your whole life.

[Source: SimpleMost]

Related: Budgeting skills everyone should know

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11 budgeting skills everyone should master
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11 budgeting skills everyone should master

1. See Money as a Tool

We tend to think of money in a lot of different ways. Money can be freedom, it can be despair, it can mean power or significance, or any one of a number of things. The point is, to be good at budgeting, develop the mindset that money is a tool. It helps you do the things that you want and need to do. No matter how much or how little you have, your money can help you achieve your goals.

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2. Record Your Transactions

On a practical level, you will need a record of your transactions to start a budget, and you will need to keep recording them to continue budgeting. You can do this by hand, via an app, or once a week on a spreadsheet. Do it however works for you, but learn to record your transactions and you will be well on your way to budgeting.

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3. Assess Your Spending

Recording your transactions won't help if you never think about them. Learn to categorize your transactions in whatever way is meaningful for you, so you can see how much you're spending in different areas. This can help you decide where to spend more, where to spend less, and what cutting back might look like in your everyday life.

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4. Make a Budget

This might be the most obvious skill in this list, but it's also one of the most important. There are spreadsheets you can download, programs like YNAB and Mint that help you see your spending in different ways, and more. Some things to think about before you choose a method involve deciding whether you want to go old school or online, and whether you want to store it on your personal computer or in the cloud.

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5. Write It Out

Throughout the budgeting and recording process, it will help if you actually write things out. This can be on a computer, though there is something about the act of writing something and then seeing it there in your own handwriting that helps you remember. Whatever you do, don't keep your budget in your head. It's easy for numbers to become fuzzy and for you to forget about your budget entirely. Instead, put your budget where you can see it often, so that it feels real and you remember your goals.

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6. Plan Ahead

When you make your budget, don't just think about what you need right now, or even your monthly expenses. Think, too, about expenses that only come around every so often. Car insurance, life insurance, and property taxes are a few line items that can fall into these categories. Then, save a little bit of money every month toward these items, so you can pay them without worry when that bill shows up.

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7. Include Spending Money

If you don't have spending money, you will feel like your budget is a cage you need to break out of, rather than a structure supporting you and your goals. Even if all you can afford is $5, give yourself something. This can go against the grain, especially if you have a lot of debt or very little income. However, you are important. And you will be happier keeping your budget if you know you have a little money you can spend however you want.

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8. Make a System That Works for You

It's easy to get sucked into a system that doesn't work for you. For instance, you may not be able to track your spending every day. If that's you, then don't buy into a budgeting system that requires this. There are plenty of systems where you can record once a week, or so. If the system doesn't work for you, you won't do it, and there won't be any value to budgeting. Keep trying things until you find something you like.

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9. Live With Discipline

This is a huge skill and one that won't happen overnight. Living a disciplined life, though, will go far toward helping you make and keep your budget. Pay attention to your budget. Update it. And when you don't have any money left for something, stop spending! It can help to breathe through your desires, to remind yourself of your bigger goals, and to give yourself a waiting period before you buy things.

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10. Know When to Splurge

This is a tricky skill, especially in light of the one above. However, there are times in every life when it's right to splurge. This doesn't have to be a huge spending binge — it can be something as small as a coffee with a friend. A lot of times, this comes into play when you choose to buy something of a higher quality even though it costs more. It's up to you to decide when to splurge, but make sure there's some room for it in your financial life.

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11. Ask Yourself Hard Questions

When you're budgeting alone or you are the one in charge of the budget, it can be easy to let things slide. Get into the habit of asking yourself hard questions, like, "Why do I always spend too much on entertainment?" and "Am I realistically able to take that vacation this year?" You may not like the answers you find, but being honest with yourself will ultimately help you become more aware of who you are and how things work inside of you — which will help you meet your goals, financial and otherwise.

Photo credit: Getty

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