Keep your pet in your bedroom for a better night's sleep

Want a better night's rest? Invite Fido into your bedroom! You could improve your sleep quality just by snoozing with your pet.

The catch? Lassie better have her own bed! That's according to new research from the Mayo Clinic.

The goal was to see how sleeping with a pet affects your sleep. Scientists studied 40 dog owners with no sleep disorders over the course of five months. Both the humans and their pups wore activity devices to track their sleep patterns for seven nights of the study.

The results showed people who kept their dogs in their bedroom experienced better sleep quality compared to those who didn't. Scientists think it's all about security.

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16 PHOTOS
These 15 dog breeds are the most likely to run away from home
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These 15 dog breeds are the most likely to run away from home

#15: Australian Shepherd

Australian shepherd owners typically lose their dog about 0.9 times a month.​​​​​​

Photo: Rhonda Venezia Photographer via Getty Images

#14: Bernese Mountain Dog

Bernes mountain dog owners typically lose their dog about 0.9 times a month.

Photo: Martin Ruegner via Getty Images

#13: Treeing Walker Coonhound

Treeing walker coonhound owners typically lose their dog about 0.9 times a month. 

Photo: ExcitingTravelsGoNow via Getty Images

#12: Standard Poodle

Standard poodle owners typically lose their dog about 0.9 times a month.

Photo: ivanastar via Getty Images

#11: American Bulldog

American bulldog owners typically lose their dog about 0.9 times a month.

Photo: Carolyn A McKeone via Getty Images

#10: Great Dane

Great Dane owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: Jupiterimages via Getty Images

#9: Saint Bernard

Saint Bernard owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: Danita Delimont via Getty Images

#8: Belgian Malinois

Belgian Malinois owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: Ozgur Donmaz via Getty Images

#7: Black and Tan Coonhound

Black and tan coonhoud owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: WilleeCole via Getty Images

#6: Pit Bull Mix

Pit bull mix owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: Paul Park via Getty Images

#5: Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick coonhound owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: Avondell via Getty Images

#4: Catahoula Leopard Dog

Catahoula leopard dog owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: mountinez via Getty Images

#3: Great Pyrenees

Great Pyrenees owners typically lose their dog about 1.2 times a month.

Photo: John P Kelly via Getty Images

#2: Bloodhound

Bloodhound owners typically lose their dog about 1.5 times a month.

Photo: Danita Delimont via Getty Images

#1: Anatolian Shepherd

Anatolian shepherd owners typically lose their dog about 2.13 times a month.

Photo: Scott Hailstone via Getty Images

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If the dog is in the room and hears something fishy, it'll bark.

It's also a good way for us to get rid of the guilt we feel for leaving them alone while we're at work so we "throw them a bone" by letting them in the room for bedtime.

However, the study was very small and more research is needed to prove sleeping with your dog in the room helps. On the flip side, people who let their dogs sleep in bed with them had a lower quality of sleep.

With some dogs, good luck even getting a pillow from those bed hogs!

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19 PHOTOS
Animals being rescued during Hurricane Harvey
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Animals being rescued during Hurricane Harvey
A man carries a dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A boy hugs his grandmothers' dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27: Volunteers and officers from the neiborhood security patrol help to rescue residents and their dogs in the upscale River Oaks neighborhood after it was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27 2017: Elma Moreno comforts her dog, Simon as they are loaded on to a trucks after being evacuated from their flooded apartment. Tropical Storm Harvey is causing major flooding throughout Houston and Southeast Texas. (Photo by Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
A man carries a dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey at the Highland Glen housing development in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bentley, a 10 year old maltese, takes refuge with his owner in a school after they lost their home to Hurricane Harvey in Rockport, Texas, U.S. August 26, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Pets are evacuated from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
People and their pets are rescued from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey on a boat in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Kenneth and Minnie Bice prepare to sleep outside the M.O. Campbell Red Cross shelter in Aldine, Texas, United States August 28, 2017. Pets are not allowed inside and so the two are sleeping on the portico with their two dogs and a cat. REUTERS/Peter Henderson
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27: Residents carry their pets and belongings along Mercury Drive as they flee flood water at their homes in Houston, TX on Sunday, Aug 27, 2017. Rising water from Hurricane Harvey pushed thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground Sunday in Houston. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Flood victims move crates with pets at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People check in with their pets to a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Evacuation residence from the Meyerland area are loaded onto a truck on an I-610 overpass during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Hurricane Harvey left a trail of devastation Saturday after the most powerful storm to hit the US mainland in over a decade slammed into Texas, destroying homes, severing power supplies and forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Evacuation residents from the Meyerland wait on an I-610 overpass for further help during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Hurricane Harvey left a trail of devastation Saturday after the most powerful storm to hit the US mainland in over a decade slammed into Texas, destroying homes, severing power supplies and forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People make their way out of a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: Evacuees make their way to dry land after leaving their homes that were inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A vet holds a dog at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People evacuate their homes after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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