These drinking games are terrible for your health

Drinking games may seem fun and innocent when you first start drinking alcohol, but they can actually prove extremely detrimental to your health. And they are nowhere near uncommon.

An overwhelming majority of Americans – 95 percent – have played a drinking game at some point in their lives, according to an American Addiction Centers online survey of more than 1,000 Americans ages 18 and older. These games include everything from flip cup to beer pong and more – all with unique, dangerous issues. Millions of people binge drink a year, resulting in alcohol poisoning and death.

Take flip cup, a game where "it only takes 32 minutes to reach a 0.16 BAC (blood alcohol content) ... which can lead to amnesia, vomiting, or a loss of consciousness," according to the American Addiction Centers. This amount of time is much faster than other drinking games. In flip cup, you're part of a team whose goal is to finish drinking – then flipping all your cups – faster than the other team.

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Brown University: 43 rape reports

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University of Connecticut: 43 rape reports

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Dartmouth College: 42 rape reports

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Wesleyan University: 37 rape reports

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University of Virginia: 35 rape reports

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Harvard University: 33 rape reports

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University of North Carolina at Charlotte: 32 rape reports

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Rutgers-New Brunswick: 32 rape reports

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University of Vermont: 27 rape reports

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Stanford University: 26 rape reports

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As for beer pong, which 90 percent of Americans have played, you and your teammate's objective is to sink ping pong balls into your opponents' cups of beer across a table. When that happens, your opponent has to drink out of that cup. The more alcohol in each cup, the more you could become seriously intoxicated.

While that 90 percent statistic may appear striking, there's another insidious factor at play. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says that 9.2 percent of Americans have a propensity for addiction. If a large amount of people are indeed playing drinking games, this means there are more people who are likely to initiate or exacerbate their alcoholism, according to Solutions Recovery CEO Dave Marlon. Solutions Recovery is an American Addiction Centers facility.

It's not just the stereotypical fraternity brother playing these games, either. The survey found people of all ages like playing drinking games. "Between 11 and 22 percent of those surveyed said the quickly intoxicating Flip Cup was their favorite of the five games," according to American Addiction Centers.

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#20: Temecula, California
Population: 104,955
Median household income: $78,535
Unemployment rate: 6.9%
Poverty rate: 8.1%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 92.4
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 2,340.5

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#19: Rochester, Minnesota
Population: 109,252
Median household income: $63,472
Unemployment rate: 3.5%
Poverty rate: 9.6%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 183.5
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,990

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#18: Bellevue, Washington
Population: 132,268
Median household income: $92,524
Unemployment rate: 4.7%
Poverty rate: 8.0%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 106.4
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 3400.5

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#17: Cape Coral, Florida
Population: 161,804
Median household income: $49,841
Unemployment rate: 7.8%
Poverty rate: 13.6%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 143.4
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,938.8

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#16: Burbank, California
Population: 104,484
Median household income: $66,111
Unemployment rate: 6.1%
Poverty rate: 10.1%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 142.9
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 2,309.6

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#15: Carlsbad, California 
Population: 109,296
Median household income: $87,416
Unemployment rate: 5.6%
Poverty rate: 10.4%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 181.7
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,541.5

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#14: Plano, Texas
Population: 271,166
Median household income: $82,944
Unemployment rate: 4.2%
Poverty rate: 7.4%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 165.2
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,974.7

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#13: Corona, California
Population: 157,395
Median household income: $77,021
Unemployment rate: 7.1%
Poverty rate: 11.3%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 106.1
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 2,135

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#12: Overland Park, Kansas
Population: 178,945
Median household income: $72,231
Unemployment rate: 3.7%
Poverty rate: 6.0%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 178.6
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,656.3

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#11: Santa Clara, California
Population: 119,525
Median household income: $93,840
Unemployment rate: 5.2%
Poverty rate: 9.0%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 133.8
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 2,698.3

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#10: Torrance, California
Population: 147,181
Median household income: $78,286
Unemployment rate: 5.3%
Poverty rate: 6.9%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 104.8
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,772.6

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#9: Fort Collins, Colorado
Population: 149,627
Median household income: $53,775
Unemployment rate: 5.3%
Poverty rate: 18.4%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 213.6
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 2,455.6

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#8: Port St. Lucie, Florida
Population: 169,260
Median household income: $48,898
Unemployment rate: 8.5%
Poverty rate: 15.2%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 141
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,448.5

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#7: Sunnyvale, California
Population: 145,921
Median household income: $103,257
Unemployment rate: 5.4%
Poverty rate: 7.9%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 111.8
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,577.2

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#6: Ann Arbor, Michigan 
Population: 115,985
Median household income: $56,835
Unemployment rate: 4.0%
Poverty rate: 22.8%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 164.8
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,868.1

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#5: Orange, California 
Population: 138,980
Median household income: $77,086
Unemployment rate: 6.2%
Poverty rate: 12.5%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 100.9
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,591.9

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#4: Round Rock, Texas
Population: 106,972
Median household income: $70,952
Unemployment rate: 5.3%
Poverty rate: 9.6%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 124.8
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,951

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#3: Glendale, California 
Population: 195,380
Median household income: $52,451
Unemployment rate: 6.7%
Poverty rate: 14.6%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 94.4
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,559.3

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#2: Thousand Oaks, California 
Population: 128,126
Median household income: $99,115
Unemployment rate: 6.4%
Poverty rate: 7.0%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 99.1
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,237.9

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#1: Naperville, Illinois 
Population: 144,108
Median household income: $109,512
Unemployment rate: 4.7%
Poverty rate: 4.4%
Annual violent crimes per 100,000: 77.6
Annual property crimes per 100,000: 1,123

Photo credit: Getty

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So, how can people – particularly college students being exposed to a party-friendly environment – steer clear of these dangerous games?

Marlon says they can pursue alternative physical activities like sports, but to also remember their schoolwork, employment and family obligations as good reasons to not get inebriated.

"I like defining alcoholism or addiction as compulsive use despite negative consequences," he says. Recognizing these negative consequences is a good coping mechanism or way to help convince people not to take part in these games.

Marlon is particularly concerned about people who regularly play these games. Playing one at a family barbecue or with a group of friends may be fine for many, as long as participants acknowledge that 1 in 10 have the propensity to alcoholism that it could be triggering. The American Addictions Center also recommends harm reduction techniques for several drinking games. These include playing beer pong with water instead.

The be all end all? Get help if you think you need it.

" ... If someone finds they're drinking or using more than they intended to, or told themselves they weren't gonna do this this time and they end up doing it again, that they shouldn't be ashamed, they shouldn't be embarrassed. What they should do is seek professional help."

Related: Best college rankings

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20 (tie). Emory University, Georgia 

Undergraduates: 6,867
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $47,954

(Photo via Shutterstock)

20 (tie). Georgetown University, Washington D.C.

Undergraduates: 7,562
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $50,547

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20 (tie). University of California -- Berkeley 

Undergraduates: 27,496
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $13,509 (in-state); 40,191 (out-of-state)

(Photo via Getty Images)

19. Washington University in St. Louis

Undergraduates: 7,504
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $49,770

(Photo via Shutterstock)

15 (tie). Cornell University, New York

Undergraduates: 14,315
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $50,953

(Photo via Getty Images)

15 (tie). Rice University, Texas

Undergraduates: 3,910
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $43,918

(Photo via Getty Images)

15 (tie). University of Notre Dame, Indiana

Undergraduates: 8,462
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $49,685

(Photo via Getty Images)

15 (tie). Vanderbilt University, Tennessee

Total undergraduate enrollment: 6,883
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $45,610

(Photo via Shutterstock)

14. Brown University, Rhode Island

Undergraduates: 6,652
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $51,367

(Photo via Getty Images)

12 (tie). California Institute of Technology

Undergraduates: 1,001
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $47,577

(Photo via Getty Images)

12 (tie). Northwestern University, Illinois

Undergraduates: 8,314
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $50,855

(Photo via Getty Images)

11. Dartmouth College, New Hampshire

Undergraduates: 4,307
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $51,438

(Photo via Getty Images)

10. Johns Hopkins University, Maryland

Undergraduates: 6,524
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $50,410

(Photo by Danita Delimont via Getty Images)

8 (tie). University of Pennsylvania

Undergraduates: 9,726
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $51,464

(Photo by Jia He via Getty Images)

8 (tie). Duke University, North Carolina

Undergraduates: 6,639
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $51,265

(Photo by Lance King via Getty Images)

7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Undergraduates: 4,527
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $48,452

(Photo by Wangkun Jia via Getty Images)

5 (tie). Stanford University, California

Undergraduates: 6,999
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $47,940

(Photo by Nancy Nehring via Getty Images)

5 (tie). Columbia University, New York

Undergraduates: 6,102
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $55,056

(Photo via Shutterstock)

3 (tie). Yale University, Connecticut

Undergraduates: 5,532
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $49,480

(Photo via Shutterstock)

3 (tie). University of Chicago

Undergraduates: 5,844
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $52,491

(Photo by Nisian Hughes via Getty Images)

2. Harvard University, Massachusetts

Undergraduates: 6,699
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $47,074

(Photo via Shutterstock)

1. Princeton University, New Jersey

Undergraduates: 5,402
Tuition and fees (2016-2017): $45,320

(Photo via Getty Images)

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