Solar eclipse could harm pregnant women according to superstition

A lot of people are really excited about the upcoming solar eclipse which will be the first one to be seen in the US since the year 1979!

But according to some legends, pregnant women should fear the eclipse. So if you are preggers, listen up!

USA Today reports that a Mexican superstition suggests pregnant women should not watch the eclipse otherwise their baby might have facial deformities or birth marks.

Where to see the eclipse:

16 PHOTOS
States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017
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States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017

Salem's the first sizable U.S. city with a chance to catch the eclipse when it hits Oregon.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will hit residents in Idaho next, with an opportunity to see totality in Idaho Falls. In Boise? Drive north a bit for your chance at totality.

Source: NASA

The eclipse sweeps across most of Wyoming, with Casper perfectly placed along the center of the path -- which means the eclipse will last longer there than on the outer edges.

Source: NASA

In Montana, but don't want to leave the state to get your eclipse fix? Totality will be visible from a tiny sliver of the Southwest corner of the state, but it's probably easier to just drive all the way to Idaho or Wyoming instead.

Source: NASA

Plenty of Nebraskans will have the chance to catch totality -- as the moon's shadow passes from the northwest corner of the state to the southeast corner.

Source: NASA

Like Montana, the total eclipse path will scrape across the tiniest portion of Iowa, but again, your best bet will likely be to travel into a state to your south or west instead. 

Source: NASA

You can catch the total eclipse from Kansas too if you head up to the northeast corner.

Source: NASA

Folks in Kansas City will get to see the total eclipse in Missouri, along with those in Columbia as it heads southeast across the state. St. Louis residents might need to drive a bit to see the total show.

Source: NASA

Residents of southern Illinois will get a total eclipse treat too, but anyone north of Belleville will need to drive to catch the big sight.

Source: NASA

Most folks in southwest Kentucky will get a chance to see the moon's shadow too.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will sweep across a big swath of Tennessee next, hitting Nashville and sweeping between Knoxville and Chattanooga.

Source: NASA

The northeast corner of Georgia is in the eclipse's path too. 

Source: NASA

Only a handful of North Carolinians will be able to see the total eclipse from their homes, as it hits a tiny portion of the southwest corner of the state.

Source: NASA

Source: NASA

Check out the entire eclipse's path!

Source: NASA

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This stems from the Aztec belief that a lunar eclipse was a result of a bite being taken out of the moon. As a result, during a solar eclipse, a bite would be taken out of an unborn child's face.

To prevent the birth defect, Mexicans believe the woman should wear a safety pin and red underwear.

But for Hindu superstition, it's the other way around. Women should avoid wearing any metal and do not use a knife or any sharp weapon.

Indian women are also encouraged to bathe before and after the eclipse and partake in other religious routines to ward off bad omens associated with the eclipse.

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