Meet Vogue's latest model - London's first female police chief

LONDON, Aug 3 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Upmarket fashion magazine Vogue has featured an unexpected new model in its latest edition - London's first female police chief.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick has posed in her uniform for the glossy magazine as part of a feature that celebrates women at the top of their game.

Dick, 56, is the first female commissioner in the London police force's 188-year history and began leading the organization of 43,000 officers and staff in April this year.

Dick, an experienced counter-terrorism officer, had a turbulent start to her new role with London's emergency services having to cope with a devastating fire which engulfed the Grenfell tower block in central London, killing about 80 people.

Related: Life after the London fire

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After the London fire
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After the London fire
People comfort each other after a prayer vigil outside Notting Hill Methodist Church close to the tower block severely damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
Damage is seen to a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
People react near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Firefighters with a dog walk around the base of the Grenfell Tower block that was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
A woman attaches a placard on a wall near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Volunteers move pallets for supplies for people affected by the Grenfell Tower block which was destroyed in a fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Volunteers prepare supplies for people affected by the Grenfell Tower block which was destroyed in a fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
A drone flies near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A firefighter is cheered near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, west London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
A man gestures as people write messages on a wall near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, west London, Britain June 15, 2017. . REUTERS/Paul Hackett TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Local residents hang a banner over a balcony following the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
People react near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
A woman holds a missing person posters near the Grenfell Tower block which was destroyed in a fire in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
London Mayor Sadiq Khan listens to a woman at an event where he addressed a crowd of people near the scene of the fire which destroyed the Grenfell Tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Damage is seen to a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Messages are displayed near a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
A missing person notice in attached to a tree next to donated food near the scene of a fire disaster that destroyed a tower block, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Britain's Prime Minister, Theresa May, speaks to police officers as she visits the scene of a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Damage is seen to a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Flowers are laid at the base of a message wall near a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Missing person posters are worn by people standing near a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Clothing is laid out on the pavement near a tower block severely damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
A woman is comforted as they stand near a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Water continues to be sprayed onto the tower block that was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
A fireman's ladder rests, amid the debris, against the tower block that was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Firefighters stand amid debris in a childrens playground near a tower block severly damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Food is distributed near a tower block severely damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Paul Hackett
Food, drink and other supplies are stored near a tower block which was destroyed in a fire disaster, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Firefighters rest near a tower block, severely damaged in a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Smoke billows from a tower block severly damaged by a serious fire, in north Kensington, West London, Britain June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
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"There is something about putting the uniform on. You've got a role to play, to be calm, to lead other people, to go forward when everyone else is running away. It gives you a sense of, not of courage but, 'It's my job,'" Dick told Vogue.

Dick joined the London force, known as Scotland Yard, in 1983 as a constable and made her way up the ranks to become Britain's most senior counter-terrorism officer and national director for security during the 2012 London Olympic Games.

In the Queen's 2015 New Year Honour's List she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).

Dick said the Grenfell fire and recent fatal attacks in Westminster and by London Bridge had meant long working hours but the police force's morale has stayed high.

"It's brought the public supporting the police, even more than before. You can't walk down the road without people coming up to you and shaking your hand and saying thank you for what you're doing. All the staff say the same," she said. (Editing by Belinda Goldsmith)

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