This is the one ingredient Ina Garten refuses to buy at the store

Dedicated disciples of Ina Garten—aka all of us—are all too familiar with the Contessa's set of famed cooking commandments. And while most of us can only aspire to one day having her extensive collection of expensive Le Creuset cookware, a gaggle of friends offering freshly laid eggs and a freezer filled with homemade chicken stock, Garten always knows how to comfort us with her most famous rule of all: "Store-bought is fine."

Well, except when it comes to a certain ingredient.

In a recent interview with Time, Garten revealed the one item that doesn't pass her distinguished benchmark: pre-grated Parmesan cheese.

Related: The Barefoot Contessa throughout the years

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Ina Garten through the years
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Ina Garten through the years
SO.Cookbook.Garten.RDL (5/10/99) (San Juan Capistrano) The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook author Ina Garten signs books at a reception at Mission San Juan Capistrano. TIMES (Photo by Robert Lachman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Ina Garten (Photo by Brian Ach/WireImage) *** Local Caption ***
CORAL GABLES, FL - OCTOBER 31: Ina Garten signs copies of her book Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics at Books And Books on October 31, 2008 in Coral Gables, Florida (Photo by Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images)
SANTA MONICA, CA - NOVEMBER 14: Ina Garten attends 'The Barefoot Contessa' Book Signing At William Sonoma on November 14, 2008 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by Michael Bezjian/WireImage) *** Local Caption ***
NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 12: Celebrity Chef Ina Garten attends Chado Ralph Rucci Spring 2010 during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Bryant Park on September 12, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Shawn Ehlers/WireImage)
03/15/2007- The Barefoot Contessa (Ina Garten) host of Food Network shows and cookbook author. Publicist Cathy Paine (cell: 416-433-6546) will be there. The signing starts at 12:30 pm. Photog can take pix backstage and as signing begins. For Marion Kane's columnDish.(Vince Talotta/Toronto Star) (Photo by Vince Talotta/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
Avery Yale Kamila/Staff Writer: July 30, 2010: Independent gubernatorial candidate Eliot Cutler and Ina Garten, who is known to her cookbook readers and TV audiences as the Barefoot Contessa. staff photo (Photo by Avery Yale Kamila/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 08: TV personality Ina Garten attends the 10th Annual New York Times Arts & Leisure Weekend photocall at the Times Center on January 8, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images)
Television personality Ina Garten attends the 10th Annual New York Times Arts & Leisure Weekend photocall at the Times Center on January 8, 2011 in New York City. *** Local Caption ***
SAGAPONACK, NY - JUNE 25: (L-R) Nicole Miller, Ina Garten, Alec Baldwin attend the 'Barefoot Under the Stars' event at the Wolffer Estate Vineyard on June 25, 2011 in Sagaponack, New York. (Photo by Sonia Moskowitz/Getty Images)
SAGAPONACK, NY - JUNE 25: Jeffrey and Ina Garten attend the 'Barefoot Under the Stars' event at the Wolffer Estate Vineyard on June 25, 2011 in Sagaponack, New York. (Photo by Sonia Moskowitz/Getty Images)
TODAY -- Pictured: (l-r) Ina Garten and Matt Lauer appear on NBC News' 'Today' show (Photo by Peter Kramer/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 28: Jeffrey Garten and wife Ina Garten attends the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Opening Night Gala at New York City Center on November 28, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Jim Spellman/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 11: Ina Garten signs copies of her book 'Barefoot Contessa Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust' at Barnes & Noble Union Square on December 11, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 28: Jeffrey Garten and wife Ina Garten attends the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Opening Night Gala at New York City Center on November 28, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Jim Spellman/WireImage)
Ina Garten attending the Broadway Opening Night Performance of 'Cat On A Hot Tin Roof' at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City on 1/17/2013 (Photo by Walter McBride/Corbis via Getty Images)
THE CHEW - Barefoot Contessa Ina Garten makes her debut on âThe Chew,â today, April 10, 2013. 'The Chew' airs MONDAY - FRIDAY (1-2pm, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Donna Svennevik/ABC via Getty Images) MICHAEL SYMON, CARLA HALL, MARIO BATALI, INA GARTEN, DAPHNE OZ, CLINTON KELLY
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - JUNE 16: Professor Jeffrey Garten and TV personality Ina Garten attend The 40th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on June 16, 2013 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images)
TODAY -- Pictured: Ina Garten appears on NBC News' 'Today' show -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
TODAY -- Pictured: Ina Garten appears on NBC News' 'Today' show -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 27: Barefoot Contessa's Ina Garten and Muppets attend the Sesame Workshop's 13th Annual Benefit Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street on May 27, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK - APRIL 21: Jeffrey Garten and Ina Garten at the TIME 100 Gala held at Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 21, 2015 in New York City. PHOTOGRAPH BY Photo Image Press / Barcroft Media (Photo credit should read Photo Image Press / Barcroft Med via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 10: Ina Garten attends the 2015 Forbes Women's Summit: Transforming The Rules Of Engagement at Pier 60 on June 10, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Daniel Zuchnik/WireImage)
EAST HAMPTON, NY - AUGUST 13: Ina Garten attends the East Hampton Library's 12th Annual Authors Night Benefit on August 13, 2016 in East Hampton, New York. (Photo by Sonia Moskowitz/WireImage,)
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True, we secretly might roll our eyes at her insistence on those pricey bottles of Nielsen Massey vanilla, but this is one grocery store staple we can agree with her on. Tubs of pre-grated Parmesan can often include a certain percentage of wood pulp as opposed to, you know, cheese; it can also be trickier finding a brand that actually contains authentic Parmigiano-Reggiano versus a domestic knockoff.

So if you can't fly directly to Modena to claim your own wheel of Reggiano yourself, no, store-bought is definitely not fine. (In all seriousness, a freshly grated wedge of the authentically stamped stuff, purchased from a source you trust, is your best bet.)

whoever made this is amazing 😂 #goodvanilla #storeboughtisfine #howeasywasthat #cookingforjeffrey

A post shared by jam | food blogger | ny & nj (@jamshungry) on

Related: You might want to stay away from these cheeses

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The Worst Cheeses For Your Health
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The Worst Cheeses For Your Health

When eaten in moderation, cheese can be a part of a healthy diet. Many brands are rolling out low-fat and low-sodium versions, but are these alternatives better than the originals? Read on to discover the best and worst types of cheeses for your health.

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Low-fat cheese

Cheese is a major source of saturated fat, but some types of cheese are naturally low in fat like Parmesan, grated Romano and part-skim mozzarella. Consumers can also buy low-fat or fat-free varieties of cheese made from reduced-fat or skim milk. Low-fat options of cottage, ricotta, Cheddar, Swiss, Parmesan, Colby, Meunster, provolone, Mexican blend or American exist on the market.

How do the experts weigh in on these low-fat alternatives?

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Fat equals flavor

Lower fat versions have a reputation for tasting milder, feeling rubbery in texture and cooking differently than their full-fat counterparts, and one cheese expert has likened the taste of low-fat cheese to that of “an eraser”. In addition, many brands replace fat with fillers to restore cheese’s creamy texture.

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Should I buy Full-fat or Low-fat?

You may need to shop around and experiment to find a great tasting, low-fat cheese that fits your needs. Otherwise, stick to your full-fat favorites, but consume them in moderation or use them to accent dishes.

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Avoid High-Fat Cheese

Try to consume high-fat cheese sparingly. Cheeses to watch out for include goat cheese, feta cheese and blue cheese. One ounce of semi-soft goat cheese has 6 grams of saturated fat, which makes up approximately 29% of the daily value.

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Low-Sodium Cheese

Salt helps transform liquid milk into cheese and determines the cheese’s taste, texture, food safety and shelf life. Since it is integral to the cheese-making process, cheese must contain some salt.

When you’re shopping for low-sodium cheese, one helpful tip is to choose softer, less-aged cheese, which tends to have less salt.

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Try These Low-Sodium Cheeses

Varieties like Swiss, Monterey Jack, ricotta, and Port de Salut are naturally low in sodium. There are also lower sodium varieties of Colby-Jack, provolone, Muenster, mozzarella and Cheddar on the market.

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Avoid these High-Sodium Cheeses

In general, processed cheese like American, blue cheese, Roquefort cheese, parmesan cheese, feta cheese and cottage cheese contain high amounts of sodium. One ounce of Roquefort cheese contains about 507 mg of sodium, which is more than one-third of the recommended average daily sodium intake level. One ounce of grated parmesan cheese contains 428 mg of sodium.

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Low-Lactose Cheese

According to the National Dairy Council, natural cheeses like Cheddar, Colby, Monterey Jack, mozzarella and Swiss are great sources of calcium for individuals with lactose intolerance because most of the lactose is removed during the cheese-making process when the curds are separated from the whey.

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Low-Lactose Cheese

In general, more mature, hard cheese has lower lactose content. This is because natural bacteria Lactobacillus turn lactose into easily digestible lactic acid during the aging process.

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Cheese is High in Calcium

While cheese may be high in saturated fat and sodium, it is also an excellent source of essential nutrients like calcium. In fact, cheese is the second highest source of dietary calcium in the American diet.

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High Calcium Cheese

If you’re looking to add more calcium in your diet, the National Dairy Council recommends Swiss, Cheddar, ricotta, mozzarella, Monterey Jack, Gouda, queso blanco, Mexican blend and Colby. Half a cup of part-skim ricotta cheese provides 337 mg of calcium, which is about one-third of the daily-recommended calcium intake for adults ages 19 to 50!

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Is American cheese bad for you?

Many people turn their noses up at American cheese for being "unhealthy" and "not real cheese". American cheese is technically referred to as a "cheese product" because it contains additives like whey, emulsifiers and preservatives. As far as nutrition, one ounce of processed American cheese has 110 calories (80 of them from fat), 6 grams of saturated fat and 180 mg of sodium and provides 30% of the recommended daily amount of calcium and 10% of the recommended daily amount of vitamin A. American cheese may not be the healthiest choice, but, like other cheese, it can be part of a healthy diet when eaten in small quantities.

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Is Cheese Linked to Cancer?

In a new study, scientists from the Kaiser Permanente research center in California looked at questionnaires filled out by women with breast cancer. The questionnaires covered diet and the most commonly consumed dairy products included cheese, ice cream, yogurt, lattes and hot chocolate. According to the Daily Mail, those women who ate even one portion of one of these popular dairy products a day were 50 percent more likely to die from breast cancer within 12 years.

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Do Americans Eat Too Much Cheese?

According to SFGate, the average person in the U.S. eats 30 pounds of cheese each year, three times more than the average person ate 40 years ago. They report, "a variety of health problems are also on the rise, and studies have linked multiple diseases with the consumption of cheese." Heart attacks, caused by the fatty nature of cheese, are one of these frightening health risks.

What Cheese Attracts Mosquitos?

According to the American Mosquito Control Foundation, Limburger cheese has been found to attract mosquitos, so always avoid consuming this cheese before a camp out or hike.

Can Cheese Protect Teeth?

A study in the journal General Dentistry reports that consuming cheese and other dairy products may prevent dental cavities. Eating cheese raised the mouth's pH levels, which lowers the chance of developing cavities. Cheese also sticks to tooth enamel for further protection from acid.

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