Amid tragedy, the royal family comes forward to celebrate the 2017 Trooping the Colour

It's a royal affair!

The royal family stepped out on Saturday afternoon in London to celebrate the annual Trooping the Colour. The ceremony, which includes a procession of more than 1,000 soldiers, is a British tradition that dates back to the 17th century. It marks the sovereign's official birthday.

While the Queen Elizabeth's actual birthday was on April 21st, it was a day of celebrations for the 91-year-old monarch. Riding in a carriage with Prince Philip, the Queen waved to the crowds while sporting a powder blue ensemble and matching hat.

The Prince of Wales and Prince William, both decorated in traditional Guard of Honour uniforms, joined the procession on horseback. And as tradition states, Prince Harry and other members of the royal family followed by carriage.

Sitting next to Duchess Camilla of Cornwall, Duchess Kate Middleton joined the parade, wearing a gorgeous pink dress by her go-to designer Alexander McQueen, along with a matching hat.

See more of the royals at Trooping the Colour:

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Trooping the Colour 2017
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Trooping the Colour 2017
Britain's Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (R) travel in a horse-drawn carriage back to Buckingham Palace after attending 'Trooping the Colour' on Horse Guards Parade to mark the Queen's official birthday, in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she travels in a horse-drawn carriage back to Buckingham Palace after attending 'Trooping the Colour' on Horse Guards Parade to mark the Queen's official birthday, in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the Foot Guards, a division of the Household Division, march along The Mall to Horesguards Parade ahead of the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour', in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Prince Harry, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge take part in the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Britain's Princess Eugenie of York (L) and Britain's Princess Beatrice of York travel in a horse-drawn carriage past Buckingham Palace on their way to Horse Guards Parade for the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour', in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex and Prince Andrew, Duke of York take part in the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Princess Beatrice of York arrive for the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by DMC/GC Images)
Britain's Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (L), Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge travel in a horse-drawn carriage past Buckingham Palace on their way to Horse Guards Parade for the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour', in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge take part in the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by DMC/GC Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge rides by carriage during the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Samir Hussein/Samir Hussein/WireImage)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh ride by carriage during the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Samir Hussein/Samir Hussein/WireImage)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge rides a horse during the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Samir Hussein/Samir Hussein/WireImage)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by DMC/GC Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 17: Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge ride by carriage during the annual Trooping The Colour parade on June 17, 2017 in London, England. (Photo by Samir Hussein/Samir Hussein/WireImage)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh travel in a horse-drawn carriage past Buckingham Palace on their way to Horse Guards Parade for the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour', in London on June 17, 2017. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. / AFP PHOTO / Chris J Ratcliffe (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 10: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 48 HOURS AFTER CREATE DATE AND TIME) Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (in his role as Colonel of the Irish Guards) takes part in The Colonel's Review on June 10, 2017 in London, England. The Colonel's Review is the second rehearsal for Trooping the Colour, the ceremonial event marking the official birthday of Queen Elizabeth II. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
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The day of festivities comes at a shaky time for Britain -- the country has been faced with a series of recent tragedies, including terrorist attacks and a deadly fire. Prior to the start of the Trooping the Colour, Prince Philip and the Queen issued a moment of silence for the recent lives lost.

"Put to the test, the United Kingdom has been resolute in the face of adversity," she said. "United in our sadness, we are equally determined, without fear or favor, to support all those rebuilding lives so horribly affected by injury and loss," the Queen had said prior.

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